Category Archives: Daily Duranie Reviews

Liberty – The Daily Duranie Review

Here we are, fresh into a new year, and we’re getting back on a reasonable schedule with our review series, we promise! Today, we’re going to check out the second track off of the Liberty album, which coincidentally is titled “Liberty”.

There isn’t a lot of background on the song that is readily available. The same could be said for the album, produced by Chris Kimsey, as a whole. It was the first DD album that the band didn’t schedule a tour behind, and it seems that the whole project lost a lot of steam upon its release. John has openly admitted his struggles with drug addiction during this period, stating that he does not remember much about the making of Liberty. This was also the first album that Warren Cuccurullo was made an official band member, along with Sterling Campbell (he left in 1991). Both were also given songwriting credits.

Simon has been quoted saying that he felt like the band had lost it’s concentration during the writing and recording, as though the band just stopped paying attention. This period of the band’s history, in hindsight, seems somewhat chaotic and scattered. Perhaps that feeling contributes to the lack of love fans tend to have for this album.

Rhonda

Musicality/Instrumentation

The beginning of the song still sends chills down my spine (this is good), and I think the opening synthesizer chords going into the keyboards sounds great. This is a band that has learned a lot from the days of Notorious, taking away the great jazz, horns, and syncopated rhythms from that album. There is a great down and dirty rhythm going on, just bubbling under the surface.

The bass is easily as good, if not better, than anything else John has done – I especially appreciate it on this song because while it isn’t quite as forward in the mix as on past albums, it can be felt. The drums, while pretty basic, are good and clean, although they feel fairly autonomous to my ears – it isn’t like when John and Roger play together, but by the time of Liberty it had been five years and two albums since Roger played with the band. Even so, I can recognize the difference.

What I don’t hear much of, is the guitar. It is there, but it’s not out front. You can’t miss the guitar solo at the bridge, although it isn’t meant to be an “in your face” solo. It’s far more about creating an aesthetic, which seems to be pretty thematic for the band during this period.

Vocals

As soon as I heard Simon’s voice come in with the lyrics, I felt that pang of missing the band. I guess that’s something. Throughout the song though, I go from really enjoying Simon’s voice – it starts out like honey dripping down the side of a glass, to wishing he didn’t rely on falsetto. I’m a fan of his lower range, I guess – but the midrange is the Simon we know and love.

Lyrics

The feelings seem the same as in other songs – unrequited love, breakups, wanting what one can’t immediately have, and that sort of thing. I have no doubt that there’s a deeper message to be read here if one is so inclined. In some ways, I wonder if the love note isn’t more about the band members they’ve lost along the way. At this point in the band’s career, I would imagine the notebook filled with Simon’s poetry had been used up. The words are a lot less vague or symbolic, but the feelings still work.

Overall

As it turns out, there’s a reason why I never became a music critic. When we do these reviews, I listen to the songs we’re writing about over and over. The first time, I listen to the full song. The second, I try to focus on the music. The third, it’s for the vocals and the lyrics (I pull up the lyrics and read them along with the song). Then I tend to listen to the full song one more time, and finally – I write the review while listening to the song over and over in the background until I’m done. If it’s a song like “Hothead”, which will be our next review, listening over and over is an incentive to HURRY THE F***K up.

So, when I say that there’s a reason I didn’t become a music critic, it is because I’m too biased. I didn’t even know I *had* feelings about Liberty until I turned it on the first time. Hearing the keyboards and then Simon’s voice made me remember how much I miss them. I miss seeing this band and smiling up at them as they play. That feeling stuck with me the whole way through the review. How can I give the song a fair rating with that going on?!? I digress…

Liberty isn’t a bad song. There was the potential for something great here, and it is still lurking in the depths of the song. I wish they’d fleshed it out a bit more. The groove is good. I appreciate the jazz and syncopation. I think that instrumentally, Nick carries it and everyone else shows up as an “also appearing”. Not necessarily a bad thing, but I did have a moment when I thought about the Duran of the past – of the 80’s – and how things had changed. If I were an unbiased, unfeeling journalist, I don’t think I would have even considered that. I’d have listened to the music and let it stand on it’s own. With DD though, I can’t do it, though I try. Simon’s voice, when it is deep and passionate, does something to me. When it’s falsetto, high and thin, well, it *also* does something to me. I’ll be kind and leave it at that!

Cocktail Rating

Three cocktails!

Amanda

Musicality/Instrumentation

Musically, there is a lot here that reminds me of old school Duran. While the keyboards get the focus in the very, very beginning, soon there is a nice mixture going between the instruments. I especially like how the bass really forms the backbone with the keyboards periodically chiming in to get noticed. It isn’t like the instruments are fighting for dominance like we once heard in early Duran but more like complimenting each other. Interestingly enough, though, is that I don’t notice a lot of guitar until the song is more than half over. I’m not sure that it is super effective, though. I think the purpose was to act as a sort of bridge but, to me, I find it distracting. I think the song was fine without that.

Vocals

The vocals feel like a mixed bag to me. On one hand, I love Simon’s vocals in the beginning as they are deep and draw the listener in. I also love the layering of lines like “If you want to stay with me” which creates a depth of sorts. Yet, the song does not always stay there. At times, Simon moves to a pretty high range, which confuses me. I don’t really understand why that was needed. Was it to create a certain feeling? To make the listener think that the main character’s mood or feelings change as he tries to deal with the changes with his relationship? I’m not sure but I think it detracts from the quality of the rest of the vocals.

Lyrics

I remember the first time I listened to this album and this song, in particular. I was struck by how much Simon’s lyrics had changed from those early 80s lyrics. Back then, I struggled to understand exactly what the heck the lyrics could be talking about. It always felt like some sort of mystery or puzzle. (Union of the Snake, anyone?) With this song, though, it seems so straight-forward. To me, it always read as a song about a relationship on the verge of ending with lines like, “Thank you for fine times.” Of course, the person is willing to keep the relationship going but has put the ball in the other person’s court, so to speak, with lyrics like, “If you wanna stay with me, At your liberty.” Could it be about something else? Could it be that I’m supposed to look deeper? Maybe but nothing has ever hit me about it except for exactly what I said earlier about the obvious story. Interestingly enough, I thought that I would hate lyrics like this when I just read/heard them but I didn’t. I found the change acceptable even though I liked the way it was before.

Overall

Looking at each of the sections of the review, I notice a theme. Liberty features some good elements but also some parts that take away some of the awesomeness. It feels like there is inconsistency there. I have to wonder about some of the choices that were made in the studio. Why decide to be so obvious in the lyrics? Why include the guitar where it did? Why have Simon sing so high, vocally? If they worked more on this song, would those pieces be adjusted? Maybe they needed to work less on it. I don’t know. Now, this isn’t to say that the song isn’t enjoyable. I really do like the song and it easily gets in my head when I hear it. It just isn’t a song that my appreciation grows for it once I listen more carefully.

Cocktail Rating

Three cocktails!

Violence of Summer – The Daily Duranie Review

So here we are, at the beginning of the Liberty album. Violence of Summer [Love’s Taking Over] was the 21st single from Duran Duran, and the first off of Liberty. Curiously, this song was originally titled “Live-in Lover”, using the same musical track but different lyrics. A demo of this song (which we always find fascinating to hear), is included on an unofficial compilation Didn’t Anybody Tell You? if you can find it!

The album itself, or at least the band image, seemed to change dramatically between Big Thing and Liberty. Shorter haircuts, paler skin…and a serious muscular increase in guitarist Warren Cuccurullo, along with the addition of drummer Sterling Campbell. It was very clear this was a very different Duran Duran at the beginning of the 1990s. With that, let’s get started!

Rhonda

Musicality/Instrumentation

I don’t know how one can listen to this song and sit still. It is incredibly pop – I mean, there’s absolutely no hiding that fact with this one. Nick doesn’t even try with his semi-funhouse sounding keyboards. The other thing I notice about the song, almost immediately, is that the sound is incredibly top heavy. There isn’t much of a bottom (bass) to it, although it is there deep in the mix! Drums are there, but again- not obvious. The result is a song that doesn’t feel balanced. Fun, yes! Balanced? No.

Guitar is barely discernible as well – enough to where I have to wonder if it’s there at all! I do love the piano both at the beginning and end, and it is only then (at the end) that I hear the high hat cymbal, along with a ton of background “bubbling” as though they’ve poured (yep, you guessed it!) soda pop into a glass!

Yep, this is 100% pure, shamelessly fun, pop.

Vocals

I don’t know what in the hell was going on in Simon’s life at this time, but his vocals sound like he took a rake, swallowed it, and dragged it back out. They’re incredibly rough sounding. I don’t know if they made him sing the song 5,000 times in succession or if he had a nasty sore throat. He still hits the notes, but the ones at the top of his range suffer. Oddly, it isn’t off-putting and adds to the style of the song.

Lyrics

The themes are decidedly Duran, but presented far differently. Fleeting love, flirtation, and a bit of the female/male push and pull – nothing we haven’t seen before. What IS different, however, is the way the themes are portrayed. Rather than the somewhat romantic, poetic imagery as in previous albums, Violence of Summer is rather blatant. Girl with boy meets another boy and decides to go with him instead, causing what I can only assume is a fight later on. It’s a bit, well, pedestrian, really – and seems to be such a huge departure from songs like “Edge of America” or even “Palomino”. This is a very different Duran Duran in 1990.

Overall

Violence of Summer is a fun song. It is the song I blast in my car at 2am when I’m driving somewhere and need to stay awake. It is a carefree, sing-a-long without a worry song. The song isn’t deep, definitely not introspective, and not really the Duran Duran that I am used to. When critics speak of how pop driven Duran Duran has been during their career, my mind automatically drifts to this song.

The song still sounds incredibly top-heavy to me, as though I have my stereo turned all the way to treble without any bass. I fault the mixing here, as well as the production, because it does feel very overdone. Additionally, Simon’s raspiness – it’s distracting only because I know what he normally sounded like, and this wasn’t it. I can remember hearing this song when it was released, and while it had many of the hallmarks of a typical Duran Duran song – something was indeed different. The unbalanced sound, the lyrics about girls and bikers, and the naming of Warren as an official member of Duran Duran (1989 at the end of the Big Thing tour), along with Sterling Campbell were all things that changed the band’s sound. It would be unfair to review this song without fairly considering those major changes. I enjoy the song, but it has never been one that I take seriously. It has merit for those occasions when I need those carefree moments.

Cocktail Rating

3 cocktails!

Amanda

Musicality/Instrumentation

It hard for me to imagine, off the top of my head, another Duran song that is so focused on piano. It grabs you right away. Now, of course, this isn’t your serious piano recital kind of piano but one that it is designed to be fun and pop-focused, which I don’t mind. I like that Duran mixes it up a bit like that. Of course, other instruments chime in but it really feels like I have to really concentrate to notice them, especially guitar for the most part. As with many other Duran songs, there is some effects going on as well giving an almost underwater sort of sound through the verses. Rhonda called it “bubbling” in her review above, which is a good word for it! One final note on the musicality of this song that I have noticed is how little difference there really is between verse and chorus until the end. I have to really to listen to there lyrics to tell when the song switches from one to the other, which doesn’t feel like typical Duran to me.

Vocals

I’m not exactly sure what to think about Simon’s vocals here. One thing that amazes me about Simon’s voice is how it helps to create a mood, a feeling.  In this case, his vocals works to create a fun mood, forcing each listener to sing along even if you try to resist. I tend to think that is the only thing that was the focus when recording and mixing this one. All that was wanted was for Simon to add to the pop nature and feel of the song. That’s it. Nothing more and nothing less. One thing that intrigues me is how the band never played this album live and from what I know this song has never been played live much despite it being a single. Did the vocals play a role in that?

Lyrics

The lyrics to this song are different than a lot of Duran lyrics up until this point.  Usually, they have been either poetic or vague enough that a story is not created.  These lyrics, on the other hand, feel exactly like a story where this woman is flirting hardcore with a “biker” who is a “metalhead.”  Then, of course, the context is summer when “love takes over.”  I am not a huge fan of the whole storyline thing as I much prefer to give my own interpretation unless the story could/does act as a metaphor to something else.  That said, there are some lines that I just cannot help but sing, including, “Don’t give me drink, I don’t wanna get too stoned.”  Who hasn’t said the exact same thing at some point or another?!

Overall


I cannot say that this is best quality Duran Duran song ever made. While I appreciate the fact that this song makes me want to sing along no matter what, I miss some more typical Duran elements. I wish that the lyrics weren’t so obvious, for example. On top of that, I missed the balanced instrumentation. It feels to me that the band worked really hard to create a feeling rather than just letting the process go where it may. What interests me is the fact that there are SO many remixes of this song on various releases. Why? Did they think that the remixes would help it sell? Yet, they did not tour the album. It all just makes me wonder what they were all thinking about.

Cocktail Rating

I Believe/All I Need to Know – The Daily Duranie Review

We have some good news and some not so good news. First, we are back with another review! Unlike last time, there were not years in between. This is the good news. The not-so-good news is that we’re super late in getting it posted. This was to be Friday’s post, but due to a series of mishaps and illness, you’re seeing it today. Cheers!

The previous review focused on Lake Shore Driving, so you would think that we would move on to the Liberty album. However, we cannot forget about the b-sides of the Big Thing album. Interestingly enough, many of the extra songs during that era were what we might call remixes of sorts, such as Burning the Ground. You know, tracks that used previous Duran songs, mixed and mashed together in some new way. While we will tackle those in our own way eventually, we will be skipping them for now. For today, we’ll focus on “I Believe/All I Need to Know”.

Before we dive into what we think about the song, let’s give a little background to it. It was the b-side to All She Wants Is. According to Duran’s Wiki page, “On the aforementioned single, the song is listed as a medley, presumably referring to the two halves of the title, “I Believe” and “All I Need to Know”. “I Believe” comprises the main instrumental part of the song and can be heard on its own in bootlegged form on The Medicine. “All I Need to Know” however is so far not known to exist in any form.”

Rhonda

Musicality/Instrumentation

I love a balanced song. There is deep appreciation from me for a well-written piece of music. Not one instrument speaks louder than the rest, and the sum of all parts creates a gorgeous, delicate sound. The chords are what keep the song sounding full and lush, but they allow Simon’s vocals to take center stage. That’s how I would describe I Believe/All I Need to Know. The song is packed with instrumentation – everything from bass and drums (and a beautifully recorded hi-hat cymbal) to harmonica and a sampled piano on the keyboards. The guitar is there, but isn’t recorded as a lead guitar, it’s more rhythmic, which suits the song. I love that it’s not really one instrument (aside from vocals) that creates the full melody, which is unusual – even for Duran Duran.

Vocals

Simon’s vocals for this song really accentuate his range during this period. He goes from the lower, deeper notes up to soaring heights in the chorus. There’s no sense of strain, no falsetto, and he sounds incredibly relaxed. Say what you will about Big Thing, but this song fits incredibly well with others from that album, such as Land, Palomino and even Edge of America. He has a sort of melancholy to his voice here, and while it does sound easy and relaxed, there’s also a little bit of wistfulness which really lends itself well to the song. His vocal quality is at it’s best, and I find myself wishing that they would record more songs in this range. Simon sounds brilliant.

Lyrics

One thing I want to comment on before looking at the lyrics is that Amanda each read the lyrics and attempt to make sense out of them in our own way. That means that we don’t always (or often) come to the same conclusion of what they mean. That’s really the way lyrics are supposed to work, too. You (the listener) are supposed to find your own meaning to the words. This is is also why Simon chooses not to explain his lyrics, because he doesn’t want to influence whatever sense the listener gets out of them. In our case, we have certainly tried to explain lyrics, and we include our thoughts on the them in our reviews. For the most part, this is because we enjoy looking at the words ourselves, and we hope that we are not ruining the lyrics for anyone else in the process.

Funny thing about Duran’s lyrics. I don’t know that I ever really paid that much attention to them when I was younger. Maybe I did, and I just didn’t understand them. Or, more likely – I was too busy daydreaming to notice. Regardless, I sit here and read through the lyrics, realizing that a lot of their songs, at least in my ears after the first album, seem to have everything to do with their experience of fame.

The taxman’s in the pocketbook

The pressmen are at the bar

And all the world is at your door.

Just those three lines remind me of what it must be like for them. Unlike most of us who come home from a day’s work, they can’t get away quite as easily. Even in 1988, Duran Duran was an all-encompassing gig. By then, they’d already seen the world, toured it extensively, said goodbye to a couple of original members, and had reached the summit of fame. I think there’s a sense of the frustration Simon must feel in the lines:

I’m just the ordinary guy you used to know,

I’m not after your money,

or even your advice

I believe you’ll follow me,

it’s all I need to know

I read this as though he can’t really get away (although he sings of walking away…or maybe he’s telling other people to walk away!). There’s also a line about turning your head away now and don’t think twice, and I go back and forth about whether that’s a reminder to himself (which I could certainly see), or if it’s an admonition to the listener. Either way, I read the song similarly as I do others of this period – the struggle with fame. As I read them, it seems to be an ongoing theme in their lyrics, even during Big Thing, which takes place well after the insanity of the early to mid 80’s. While no, I wouldn’t say the lyrics are necessary of the same vague, poetic, obscure nature as say, The Reflex, I feel like I am able to have more of a connection to them. Perhaps because I’m better able to draw something out of them? I don’t know for sure.

Overall

I like the way the song conveys a certain feeling. for me, I get a sort of wistfulness, or even melancholy from it. The song feels easy, not at all angry or brooding – but maybe just a tinge sad. I don’t know that I’m surprised by that, given the time period of it’s writing. (although at the time, I am certain I would not have picked up on it!) Regardless, I appreciate the way this band has always been able to convey it’s feelings through music. I also like the simpleness of the sound. It’s a good, solid B-side for the album, although I personally think it could have been put on Big Thing and done very well. I saw somewhere that the band says that some of these extra songs that somehow escaped the album were made all the more special as a result – and I would offer this one in particular as a prime example.

I don’t listen to this song often enough. It is one of those songs I fail to think about or give enough appreciation to in their catalog. I don’t know why that is – but I’m going to fix that and add it to a playlist.

Cocktail Rating

4 Cocktails! 4 cocktails rating

Amanda

Musicality/Instrumentation:

Listening to this song, more intensely than I normally do, I realize that there really is no lead in. The next thought that follow quickly after is how this really is a classic Duran Duran song. I love that all instruments are present with some taking on more noticeable moments like the keyboards after the chorus. I also really enjoy the fact that the bass creates a strong steady undercurrent throughout the whole song. It makes a strong foundation, allowing the other instruments to come and go as they need. In many ways, it has the feel of more old school Duran songs as opposed to the more dance-orientated songs on Big Thing. It doesn’t feel like the ballad tracks from that album either. It is a good go between in terms of tempo and overall musical vibe.

Vocals

Whenever I think about this song, the vocals are the very first thing that comes to mind, especially the chorus.  While I love the deep vocals of the verses, there is something so smooth about the chorus that really catches my attention.  Perhaps, I like the contrast between the slower, deeper vocals of the verses as opposed to the lighter, more melodic aspects of the chorus.  Of course, the backing vocals here help to add to the lush feel of the chorus in the second half of the song. It is like the emotions and the voices build up until so much just bursts through.

Lyrics

You know what is funny?  I have listened to this song countless times and even sang along with it a lot and never really looked at the lyrics.  The line that always grabbed my attention is, “I’m just the ordinary guy you used to know.”  Now that I have really examined the lyrics, I cannot help but to wonder if this wasn’t the lyrics of a very specific story.  It sounds like someone who used to be trusted and connected with someone who broke that trust, but is now pleading their case and hoping for some understanding.  Could this be an experience that Simon had?  Someone else in the band?  Maybe the band member wasn’t the one asking for understanding but the one who determines if there would be a new understanding.  The line about not being after one’s money could definitely be a person trying to reassure a band member.  So, what do I think of these lyrics?  I don’t know that they excite me like many Duran lyrics that lend themselves to interesting interpretation or act as poetry.  Yet, they don’t turn me off either.  

Overall

Overall, I really like this song. Musically, it fits well within the standard Duran catalog with the balance of instrumentation. I believe the music is enhanced with the quality of Simon’s vocals. The only area that I question is the lyrics. While they are not bad, they are almost too specific for my liking, but do fit in well for a b-side.

Cocktail Rating:

3.5 Cocktails

LakeShore Driving—The Return of the Daily Duranie Review!

Don’t ever assume we’re done…even when years go by in between reviews! Yes, it is true that approximately three years and eleven months have gone by in between the review of “Edge of America” and “Lakeshore Driving”, nevertheless, we are BACK and the reviews will continue until we’re done!! Be on the lookout for them twice a month, on the second and fourth Fridays!

To those who have not previously had the pleasure, an introduction is necessary. Basically, we challenged ourselves to review the entire Duran Duran catalog. (we don’t know what we were thinking. It is in line with agreeing to write daily, we suppose…) Granted, neither of us are music critics (but isn’t everyone a critic?), neither of us have been trained in music journalism….but that’s never stopped us before. Why now? We’re also not unbiased. (Hey, that’s a double negative, isn’t it? Damn.) That said, we try to be hard on the band, but we’re unabashed Duranies. Say whatever you will.

A couple of extra things, just to be clear:

1. We are not employees of Duran Duran.  They aren’t holding us in duress, nor are they telling us what to say and write. (We’d bet that sometimes though, they wish they could…or at least, could shut us up!)

2.  We pay for our own music. That said, anytime they want to send us music, we’re all for it. We can be bought. (Ok, ok…Just kidding about the being bought part!)

We review each song using the same guidelines of musicality/instrumentation, vocals, lyrics, and all of that put together – or overall. Then, at the end, we assign it a cocktail rating. Why cocktails? Have you not met Amanda or I yet???

1 cocktail :  It’s really not our thing and honestly at this point, the band should be sending US cocktails just to keep listening.

2 cocktails: It could really use work.  There are problems in most, if not all, areas of the song/album.  It’s not making our ears bleed, but it’s close.

3 cocktails: It’s not bad, but it’s not great either.  We aren’t going to turn it off, but we might not actively listen either.

4 cocktails:  We’re liking what we hear!  It reminds us as to why we’re still fans after all of this time!

5 cocktails:  AMAZING!  Can this band really get much better?!?  This is the Duran we know and love!

Of course, we may even do half cocktails when necessary! 

As you may have guessed, this week we press on to finish Big Thing by taking a good look (and listen) at Lakeshore Driving. As the final song on the album, it takes over from where Edge of America leaves off, quite literally. Does it pack a punch, or leave the listener dazed and confused? Read on and see just how many cocktails this one earns!

Rhonda

Musicality/Instrumentation:

Obviously, the most forward-sounding instrument is the guitar, which for me is a breath of fresh air. I love the hard-driving, rock guitar as the track starts out. It contrasts beautifully against the far lighter, almost playful, keyboards. It reminds me of the way it used to be when the guitar and keyboards would have a sort of tug-o-war quality about them, and I admit I had to remind myself that this was actually Warren playing. It’s not like the rest of the music he plays with Duran, that is for sure. Then as you keep listening, you get this wonderful second track of guitar that comes out. It is very Nile Rodgers-esque, similar to the style heard on Notorious. It is a jam session that comes to life, without being overly indulgent. I don’t hear a lot of bass or drums, unfortunately. The guitar tracks are so forward that it’s difficult to hear anything else as the song continues on. I’m not really sure I’d call it balanced, but by the same token – I don’t know that it really needs to be. In fact, perhaps the unbalance is what really works for the track.

Obviously there are no vocals or lyrics for this one, so we’ll move on….

Overall

I do love the track. It isn’t crazily long, but I like the fact that we’re hearing what this band can really do if left to their own devices. I enjoy that Duran Duran doesn’t always play by the rules. Sometimes, in hindsight, I think they’ve forgotten how to just play. I miss that. I love the feeling that this song just sort of “happened”, and it is a great placement at the end of the record. The tension and sound just continues to build and build, which is a great effect, because I just feel like I’m being swallowed into this whirlpool of sound – it’s an excellent song to listen to when you just need to stop thinking! Towards the end, the sound is full, and it’s easy to think it will never end, until it does. The effect of it just abruptly cutting out is crazy – it’s like you’re floating along grooving away and then there’s just, nothing. You drop like a 50 pound brick back into the harsh reality. This album quits, genuinely leaving you wanting more! So rude, but so good, too.

Cocktail Rating:

Four and a half cocktails!

Amanda

Musicality/Instrumentation

Before I dive into specifics, I have to acknowledge the pairing of this song with Edge of America.  It is truly rare for me (and I’m guessing countless other Duranies) to listen to this song by itself despite having its own unique track number.  After all, there is little time in between the two on the album and when they played the two tracks live, it felt like a brief pause rather than a complete change in song.  I’m sure that it was done deliberately even though the two have very different feelings.  After all, Edge of America is more introspective and softer while Lake Shore Driving is an instrumental and one driven by guitar. While I didn’t see this song performed live, I have seen clips in which Warren would come to the center stage by himself to play, clearly giving the guitar the spotlight.  That isn’t to say that it is the only instrumentation present but it definitely overshadows the rest.  You have to listen closely to hear the bass, for example.  So the question is – is Warren’s guitar and its prominence something appreciated or not?  While it is different, I’m not sure I’m a fan. When I think of the best Duran material, it is that fight for balance between the instruments in which some instruments rise to the surface for a few notes before another takes over.  That isn’t this. It could have been but it feels like so much guitar to me when I would have preferred more rhythm section, for example.

Overall

One aspect of doing reviews that I missed was taking the time to really listen closely to a song. In many cases, I learn to appreciate a song more. As I began to type this review, I starting pondering where this song is located on the album and how it is connected to the song, Edge of America. I never really thought that much about it before now, but in writing this review, I think I get it. The Edge of America gives listeners a sense of despair, of hopeless. It leaves you with the idea that the country is not meeting the needs of its people and the emotion that is left, the emotion that can be expressed is anger. “Learn to love your anger now. Anger here is all you possess.
Welcome to the edge.” That song has always reminded me of many of my students who face an incredibly uphill battle. One student, in particular, pops in my head. This kids was the youngest of a bunch of boys. All of his siblings have ended up in prison as his single mother had struggled with substance abuse and making enough money to provide for her kids. This student was bright and he soon realized that so much was going against him. As he recognized this, his anger grew. Eventually, it became his only emotion. Why share this story? I feel like Lake Shore Driving is the anger, the anger that follows the sadness, the despair. I saw it with that particular student and many others. What does this mean in terms of my review? Simple. When I listen to the song on its own, I think of it as this overbearing guitar driven track. When I place it in context, it means more. I can appreciate it more.

Cocktail Rating:

3 cocktails!

A Durandipitous Sunday Night

It is rare when Jason submits an article to Daily Duranie without a title…and when he does, I take full advantage. “Durandipitous” is my newest word creation. It’s not a word, you say? It is now. -R

I wasn’t going to go. The amount of Duran Duran shows coming through Vegas since Paper Gods was released had worn me down. It’s an emotional experience to dig deep into my soul and light the fuse of nostalgia. And tickets are getting out of hand in Sin City. The last pair of dates left a sour taste in my mouth with two predictable and pretty much identical set lists. I could miss this weekend and hold out for a new album and tour while saving up to someday get a seat up front. 


A visit to Jeff and Jason’s pop-up shop on Friday got my juices flowing. Then, the Duranies met up that night at a Tiki bar and the cocktails started to flow. I met Larry, who first saw Duran Duran in Miami, FL on the Big Thing tour. Same as me! If nothing else, the Daily Duranie party on Sunday was a must for me. There is something special about the Duran community these days. We are survivors, and the band’s continued success is our sweet reward. 
Playing StubHub bingo, I hit refresh about 5,733 times throughout the meet-up to no avail. If I was going to clean out my PayPal fun money for a ticket, it wasn’t going to be a standing room, obstructed view night. Honestly, seeing the passion and swapping stories about Duran was all I needed. Instead, there I was, watching everyone go into the show, ready to head home. Then, a Paper Goddess walked up and granted me a miracle. I was in. Not only that, I was sitting next to the curators of the pop-up shop and two of the most inspiring fans I know: Jeff and Jason. This was Durandipity! 


Opening with “Hungry Like the Wolf” is a masterful stroke. As much as I love a moody, art-pop opener like “Paper Gods”, the energy of a major single sets fire to the room. The casual fans are instantly on their feet, which is essential to a good show. I’m not sure if “I Don’t Want Your Love” counts as a major hit, but nobody sat down after the opener, and the energy was building.  While “A View To A Kill” isn’t Simon’s strongest vocal, he sells it like an exuberant uncle playing James Bond at Halloween. 


If I came for one song, it was “Anyone Out There”, which had surfaced at some recent shows. The excitement of hearing that turned out to be just the start. I never expected to hear “Astronaut”, but the opening synth of “The Chauffeur” is when I officially lost my mind. It is the one classic that I never heard live, and I had not seen it on many set lists. The video cut out a few times so maybe the video engineer was even caught off guard. It didn’t matter, the pocket of Duranies that I saw the show with were singing at the top of their lungs and there were hugs and hi-fives all around. Next to “The Seventh Stranger” earlier this year, it is probably my favorite live Duran moment so far. 


The surprises continued with a rocking “(Reach Up For the) Sunrise” with the “New Moon On Monday” snippet, but the “Planet Earth” mash-up with David Bowie stole my heart. As a music critic, my fandom often finds itself in conflict with the more honest and rationale side of my brain. This Duran Duran show more than satisfied both sides of my being. The band sounded energized, playing with a little swagger instead of going through the motions and the set list was a gift to fans. What a night!


The recent NASA show obviously served as an impetus for this short run of shows, but the thematic arc of the set represented more than that for me. As cartoon spaceman flew around the screens above the band, I kept picturing MTV moon men; the award given at the Video Music Awards in the 1980s. Perhaps they still give them away but I can’t be bothered to go see what MTV is up to in 2019. Still regarded as a video band by many, the band have proven to be so much more and all the moon man imagery of this tour playfully pokes anyone who would disagree. 


It’s hard to choose a favorite set list from a band but Sunday night in Las Vegas is probably it for me. It delivered surprises and the band seemed to have an extra gear that, honestly, isn’t there every show. When a set list changes night to night, musicians cannot lapse into muscle memory and it leads to a better performance. I see enough shows to feel confident in that assessment. I count myself lucky to have been there singing “The Chauffeur” on Sunday night and even luckier to have found a tribe of so many amazing Duranies, especially one Paper Goddess who made it all possible. Thank you. 

Record Store Day 2019

As the lights go down on another Record Store Day, Duran Duran have finally delivered a record worth the 5am wake-up call and four hours in a queue with other like-minded music fans. After last year’s disappointing EP Budokan, it was time for Duran Duran to deliver something of lasting excitement to their fans. This year’s package is an exquisite reissue of the band’s 1984 performances at the ridiculously named Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Arena. While the packaging alone makes it an essential piece of Duran Duran history, a few quibbles keep it from fully capturing the excitement and energy surrounding the band in 1984.

My first thought when I saw the announcement was, how different can it be from Arena? To put that to the test, I spent an afternoon flipping between the vinyl and an original CD version of Arena. Right away, the mix was noticeably different with regards to the synths. Nick Rhodes can be heard much clearer on As The Lights Go Down compared to the original Arena. However, when compared to the 2004 remastered version, the live performances sound pretty similar. Playing giant sheds, the sound quality remains a challenge but the mix on this release goes a long way to capturing what even the audiences might have missed under the din of screaming fans.

Where the album stumbles resides in the sequencing. The opening of “Tiger Tiger” builds in intensity and you can visualize a dark arena ready to erupt when Roger hits the first floor tom on “Is There Something I Should Know?”. Just like the tour, it is followed by Simon asking “is anybody hungry?” followed by a roaring version of “Hungry Like the Wolf” that sounds as good today as it did when it first the airwaves. Breaking the order of Arena, “Union of the Snake” follows which provides a more authentic concert experience. On the 1984 tour, the band typically followed “Hungry Like the Wolf” with the three singles from Seven and the Ragged Tiger

At each Oakland show, “New Religion” followed “Union of the Snake” so apart from skipping “The Reflex” and “New Moon On Monday”, the show unfolds much like it did at the time. However, then the show becomes a bit jumbled with “Save A Prayer” appearing far too early on the record followed by “Rio” which paired with “Girls On Film” at the end of each Oakland show. It really doesn’t belong in the middle of the record given how important it is to the band’s popularity. It would never have appeared mid-set in 1984 so it’s an odd choice to slip it into the mix here. On the remastered Arena, it was wisely included with “Girls” at the end of the CD.

The album reaches an emotional peak with “The Seventh Stranger” and “The Chauffeur”. The moody darkness of the songs hints at the deeper essence of the band which was plastered over by the media at the time. Hearing them live again, the fans aren’t the only ones who remember how meaningful they were. Revisiting the tapes of the shows to prepare this release apparently inspired the band to dust off “The Seventh Stranger” for their 2019 tour dates. Having seen two of the shows, I can attest to the emotional waterfall it created in the audience.

The final side of As The Lights Go Down ends strong with the expected hits that dominated the end of their 1984 shows. “Girls On Film” sounds especially good on this record. Best of all on this release, the energy of the show is not disrupted by studio single “The Wild Boys”. While it made sense commercially to tack it onto Arena, it never made much sense wedged in the middle of the album. Having a more full concert document from 1984 is an absolute treasure and the beautiful artwork takes you back to the Sing Blue Silver era when we were all under the spell of Duran Duran. 

Could the band have done a little more for Record Store Day? I’m looking at a wasted slab of vinyl that makes up the D side so, yes. There were at least two more live songs from that tour in the vault: “The Reflex” and “(I’m Looking For) Cracks In the Pavement” which surfaced as b-sides. A little editing of the title to As the Lights Go Down (live 1984) would do the trick since they weren’t recorded in Oakland. Add those songs to the release and move “Save A Prayer” and “Rio” to where they would have appeared during the tour. Then we would have the most complete reminder of the Sing Blue Silver tour. But as the lights go down in my music room tonight, I really don’t care. I’m watching a beautiful pink disc spin me right back to being an eleven year old obsessed with the coolest band on earth. 

Jason Lent Guest Blogger thumbnail

Jason Lent (Velvet Rebel Music) is our newest Daily Duranie Contributor! You will be seeing more of Jason’s contributions, and we are thrilled that he agreed to write with us! He discovered Duran Duran on MTV in 1983 and a lifelong musical love affair was born. In 2010, he left a job in Hawaii to tour with Cowboy Junkies as a music writer and his work has appeared in various online music outlets. He currently resides in Las Vegas managing a music venue while trying to learn John Taylor’s bass line from Rio.

The Edge of America — The Daily Duranie Review

This week, we are moving on to review The Edge of America, off of the Big Thing album. The Edge of America is a relatively short song, at 2:37, which blends into Lake Shore Driving (another song for another review). The word is that originally The Edge of America was a longer piece of music at one point, but during the course of recording morphed into what is now Lake Shore Driving.  Let’s look at how The Edge of America works as a song and fits into the vernacular of Big Thing.

Rhonda

Musicality/Instrumentation

I love the simplicity of the beginning of this song. Vocals and keyboard chords mark a particular poignant point on this album. While still very simple, the keyboards and vocals work together to make the moment intimate and special, which I really like. This continues through to the first chorus, where some percussion, bass, guitar, and stronger piano join in. One thing I really appreciate on this album as a whole is that when vocals are meant to be the highlight, the music allows – there’s no “struggle” to be heard. This has as much to do with engineering and production as it does writing – but it really shows the maturity of the band at this point in their career.

Vocals

It is on songs like these, when just hearing the emotion in Simon’s voice nearly brings me to tears, that I am reminded of Duran Duran’s potential. When they are good, they are really that good.  I love the way his voice makes me feel as though he’s singing only for me – and he’s pouring his heart into it. I can’t find a single thing to complain about here, except that the song is so short. I could listen forever.

Lyrics

This is one of those hallmark Duran Duran songs that only the most diehard fans ever really hear, unfortunately, because this is definitely on my top ten list of Duran Duran lyrics. While doing a little research before writing this review, I noticed that there are tons of different interpretations online of what this song means. I think it’s one of the more “genius” pieces of lyric that the band has done because it could mean a variety of things to people depending upon their own life experience, and isn’t that what we really want as writers?? I’ve read it could be about the band’s fall from the tops of the charts; about war; about how America treats it’s veterans. Personally, when I hear this song I think it’s adulthood and how all of those childhood dreams, fairy tales, and aspirations we once had in our hearts tend to wash away to a very gritty reality that we have no choice but to acknowledge and recognize. I love the line, “Learn to love your anger now, your anger here is all you possess, welcome to the edge”. There have been moments, rather recently, where I have literally sung this song at the top of my lungs while listening in the car, and yeah, it’s helped! This song can mean a variety of things, and I appreciate that Simon allows listeners the freedom to think and identify as we wish. It’s funny because when I was younger, I was desperate to know that I had the “right answer”. Somewhere along the line, I discovered that it really doesn’t matter. Music is for everyone. There are no right or wrong answers unless you’re not listening at all.

Overall

I confess, this is my very favorite song off of Big Thing. I still think it’s too short, but it continues to be one of my anthems in life, and therefore my biased self thinks it’s near-perfect. Truthfully, it is difficult to do this review without considering Lake Shore Driving, since the two songs are combined by a driving guitar that I dearly love – alas, that review will have to wait for another week or two.

Cocktail Rating

4.5 cocktails!

4.5 Cocktails

Amanda

Musicality/Instrumentation:

Musically, this song maintains a simplicity as the song starts off  with soft keyboard sounds to ease the listeners into the song.  Of course, more instrumentation joins in only to go back to the focus on the keyboards only and back.  In this way, the instrumentation mirrors the lyrics, which discuss both anger and resignation.  Clearly, though, the instrumentation is held in the background more, allowing the vocals to take center stage.  Of course, the end leads right into the next song, leaving the listener wanting more.

Vocals

Simon’s vocals here are exactly what they should be.  They are crisp, clear and convey the message of the song.  It almost feels to me that he is acting as the conduit to millions of others who are telling their stories through him as the emotion is so pure, so unforced, so natural.  He isn’t just Simon but he is the spokesperson so many others who need to have their stories told.  Magical.

Lyrics

These lyrics are some of the most important lyrics that Simon has ever written, in my opinion.  They are filled with a social commentary but is such that they could apply to many, many issues, especially issues that the U.S. confronts or needs to confront daily.  I have written about how this song seems to speak of my students before here in this blog post.  I wrote that blog in 2013 about how my urban students are filled with nothing but anger and that the nation seems to have turned away from them.  I could write the same thing now in 2015.  Many of my students are still angry, even though I work with older kids now and am teaching history as opposed to special education.  I still feel as though the nation has turned its back on them and on educators as I mentioned in that blog post.  To me, this song, lyrically, is what I experience on a daily basis at work as I see so many of society’s struggles walk in the door in the form of city kids.  This is when Simon is at his best–when he is able to really say something that others can really relate at the core of their beings.

Overall

This is my favorite song off of Big Thing and one of my absolute favorite Duran Duran songs ever.  I like the simplicity of the music and how it allows the vocals and lyrics the room to be as beautiful and passionate as they are.  The only thing I would change, if I could, would be to make the song longer.  I never want the song to end.

Cocktail Rating:

4.5 cocktails!

4.5 Cocktails

Land – The Daily Duranie Review

We continue our attempts to review every single song in Duran Duran’s catalog with the song “Land” from Big Thing this week. There is surprisingly little information out there about “Land”, other than no demos seem to exist (at least not that anyone outside of the band has gotten their hands on!), which may indicate that it was one of the final songs written for the album.

Rhonda

Musicality/Instrumentation

Personally, I think this is one of the prettiest songs Duran Duran has ever written – so there’s my bias right off the bat! The song opens with what might either be a muted guitar or keyboard, and background vocals, which is very unusual and immediately draws the listener in.  The one thing I really love about the music for this song is that even though there is plenty of music to “fill” the space, it also feels simple, clean, and unforced. Yet, there is a lot going on in the song. There is both acoustic and electric guitar, synthesizer, bass, drums, and even what I think is soprano sax going on in the background along with flute! I really love that the guitar solo is in the background tends to blend even though you can hear it soar – it gives a filmy texture to the music that really works for the song and doesn’t detract. Duran Duran achieved something very special with this song because what could have ended up feeling very overdone and incredibly busy still has an “easy” but lush feel, and communicated exactly the right mood. I also enjoy those open, quiet spaces that just set the song off right.

Vocals

I really like that the song opens with the background vocals – it is an usual way to open, and it draws my attention and alerts me to pay attention! Simon’s voice sounds relaxed and clear with a beautiful roundness that I miss when he sings higher in his range.  In this song, the vocals continue to build from those first moments into a soaring chorus, and then immediately come right back down to about where they began. Another effect I like is that if you listen closely to the second verse – you can hear a background track of Simon actually whispering the lyrics, which is ultra-cool and makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up.

Lyrics

There’s no arguing that these are some beautiful lyrics. When I listen to the song, it reminds me of the sailing that Simon enjoys – and perhaps it’s about his leaving his family behind.  He loves to sail, but he also loves home, and to him – that is his family.  “I need your love to land” Reminds me a bit of traveling in general – it’s always fun to go, and it’s always nice to come home again. Home is comfortable, it’s love, it’s the anchor to the rest of our lives. I kind of think that is what Simon was trying to convey here.  The lyrics aren’t necessarily all that difficult to understand, they don’t feel very abstract, but the message is, once again – beautiful.

Overall

There’s really only one word I need to describe “Land”, and that’s “beautiful”. This is one song that I can put on and drift away somewhere in my thoughts. It’s relaxing, and I think the band completely outdid themselves with the instrumentation on this one. Out of the entire album, this is the song where I can hear the most growth and maturity from the band, and it’s a shame it is stuck in the middle of the “B” side on an album that didn’t really allow the song to shine as it might have otherwise. I wish they’d play it live because it really deserves the highlight.  “Land” is a song that I didn’t really discover or fully appreciate until adulthood, which reminds me why Amanda and I decided to do these reviews to begin with – to reacquaint ourselves with the full catalog. We hope our readers are enjoying the journey with us!

Cocktail Rating

Five cocktails! 5 cocktails

Amanda

Musicality/Instrumentation

The song starts out with very soft instrumentation hidden behind the chorus of vocals.  You can hear what sounds like some beautiful soft guitar with keyboards.  I like how the notes the keyboards plays holds on for a long time until the sound just fades.  Bass and drums are present along side the other elements of the instrumentations during the verse.  If that wasn’t enough, some sax can also be heard, very quietly, in the chorus and to transition back to the verse.  Overall, the music is definitely designed to be quiet, calm, and somewhat serene no matter which instrument one focuses on.  No instrument is meant to be loud here.  This softer instrumentation allows of the vocals to stand out for the majority of the song.  Perhaps, the only time that the instrumentation takes the front seat is during the bridge when different instruments are heard, including what sounds like an acoustic guitar solo and some percussion that reminds me of a slight Middle Eastern musical flavor.  This instrumentation is very unique in the Duran catalog and definitely enhances this song to musically be something different and something special.

Vocals

The song begins with a lovely female chorus, featuring Carole Fredericks, Yvonne Jones and Beckie Bell, that lets the listener know that this song is going to be a very different Duran song but one that is soft and beautiful.  Simon’s initial vocals reinforce this idea as his vocals are so soft that they are almost breathy.  The words are gently sung with little need to finish the ends of the words.  Instead, the focus is to move smoothly to the next word, next line.  Even the chorus, which features a stronger vocal doesn’t spend a lot of time clearly saying every word.  Simon’s vocals in this song remind me again that his vocals can and do become another instrument as the vocals are perfect to match the music and the mood of the music.  I especially love the very breathy end to the song with the repetition of the line “love is land”.

Lyrics

This is not a song that I typically focus on the lyrics as I usually pay more attention to soft music.  Plus, the line that always sticks out in my head is “Your love is life, for love is land.”  This line, especially in isolation, means nothing to me.  Yet, this line takes on a more significant meaning when you glance at the entire song.  There are many references to leaving (“my ship will sail”, “Before I leave”) and this leaving appears to be through travel (“Standing, across the ocean stream”).  Could it then be that land isn’t a noun but a verb, as in to land, to make a step on new ground?  Could it be that this is a reference to commitment?  Could it be the opposite?  Could it be that one person in a relationship is leaving the other?  Maybe.  The first line about being sorry could indicate that.  No matter the actual meaning as the lyrics still meet my general requirements as I want lyrics that make me feel or make me think.  Lyrics like this with a potential metaphor definitely makes me think.  I would go so far as to say that the lyrics match the mood of the music, too, with a soft, slightly melancholy feel.  Well done, Simon.

Overall

When I think of the individual parts of this song, everything seems to be working.  While the instrumentation might be different, it is really beautiful as are the lyrics and the vocals.  Yet, I struggle to give this song a 5 cocktail rating.  I think that, for whatever reason, when I want to listen to a ballad, this one does not come to mind.  There is something that allows it to fade into the background too much.  Perhaps, this had nothing to do with the song but with the listener.  The ballads of Duran’s that are my go to are ones that I have made a personal connection to and this song I just haven’t.  On paper or in this review, it is fabulous but it hasn’t totally hooked me yet even with the additional, focused listening for this review.  That said, I suspect that if I had a chance to see it performed live, it might push me to that 5 cocktail rating!  😉

Cocktail Rating

4.5 cocktails!

4.5 Cocktails

Flute Interlude & Interlude One (Big Thing) – The Daily Duranie Review

Yes, we know it’s been a few weeks since we reviewed something from Big Thing…so today we’re trying to get back on schedule! Remember the 33 second pieces of music that pop up on Big Thing, first between “Palomino and “Land”, and then again between “Land” and “Edge of America”?  This is our super short review of both “Interlude One” and “The Flute Interlude.”

Since these interludes are pretty short – we’re not going to structure this review like most others, as you’ll read below. It’s a quickie!!

Rhonda

Each interlude is each incredibly short, as in, “Yawn for too long and you’ll have missed the entire thing.” To be fair, they are snippets that, unless I am paying rapt attention – I don’t even notice. I feel badly about that, because obviously the band felt strongly enough about each of them to include on the album, but it just doesn’t add enough power or punctuation to “Palomino, “Land”, or “Edge of America”, for me to really sit back and notice.  It begs an answer to the question of why they may have been included. Each piece is very experimental in nature, and likely the most experimental bits of music the band had included on an album to the date of Big Thing. “Interlude One” has a very cartoon-like sound to it – reminding me very much of something I’d heard on one of the Chipmunks albums I had as a kid.  I don’t really hear how the sound helps to usher in “Land”, but perhaps if the music were slowed down I’d recognize something. “Flute Interlude”, however, sounds much more comfortable in it’s musical place.  I can see how it fits right between “Land” and “Edge of America”, because if you listen to the fade-in, it begins with flute – very light and airy in nature, which truly isn’t that dissimilar from “Land” in some respects.  This flute is very much layered with other sampled sound effects, and then it fades back out as an electric guitar fades in, thus signaling the beginning of “Edge of America” – which, I don’t want to give anything away since we’ll be reviewing that song soon – but it’s a song with a pretty hard-edged guitar.  So the “Flute Interlude” serves the purpose of blending those two seemingly juxtaposed songs together.  It ends one statement while beginning another. I struggle to say the same for Interlude One, to be honest. Even so, I like the way the piece seems to snap a listener out of daydream at the end of “Palomino”, opening the door for “Land” to begin.  While I do like the way the pieces seem to not only mark the end and the beginning with a sort of punctuation mark, I still stand by the fact that if I’m not paying full attention, I almost don’t even hear them most of the time. The punch isn’t powerful enough, and so I have to wonder if it was really that necessary or effective. I’m left feeling that if the idea had been developed for just a little bit longer, perhaps a little more given to the length, the interludes would have met a fuller potential.

Cocktail Rating: 2.5 cocktails!  Two and half cocktails

Amanda:

These interludes are so short.  Of course, it won’t be the last time that Duran includes super short instrumentals on their albums.  Yet, unlike songs like “Return to Now” on All You Need Is Now, these don’t grab my attention in the same way.  I’m not sure why.  The length?  The instrumentation used?  The fact that they are both so experimental vs. more classical, in nature?  Anyway, I always welcome these reviews so that I take the time to REALLY listen and pay attention.  When I listen, I am grabbed by the most obvious aspect of both, which is how the volume starts out slow and gets louder until it changes again towards the end.  As far as “Interlude One” goes, once there is enough volume, you notice how random the instrumentation/sounds are.  It almost reminds me of a record being played on the wrong speed combined with some extra keyboard sounds thrown in for good measure.  It isn’t the most pleasant of sounds, really, as the track is really pretty jarring.  What is interesting, then, is its placement between two slower tracks of “Palomino” and “Land.”  Did they do that to break up the quietness found in those songs?  Did they worry that those songs would be missed or overlooked otherwise?  “Flute Interlude,” on the other hand, comes after Land and before “The Edge of America.”  While “TEOA” is somewhat of a slower tempo, it isn’t as ballad-like as Land and Palomino.  What is interesting is that this interlude ends with a lot of guitar and “The Edge of America” features a lot of guitar.  Is that the connection or the reason for this song’s placement?  Like the previous interlude, this song builds in volume and intensity.  It almost feels like a rapidly increasing heartbeat.  As it grows in intensity, the flute is very much present as is other instrumentation until it is not, leaving only guitar and some additional sampled sounds.  In general, I much prefer this one over “Interlude One.”  The instrumentation is just much more pleasant.  While it is still somewhat jarring at the end, it is not like the sounds of a record being played backwards, which is what the first interlude reminds me of.  Both of these very short tracks, though, remind you that the band really was experimenting with sound in a very different way than they ever had been before.  Overall, these tracks are interesting but still can be easily overlooked.  More importantly, I’m not sure that they really enhance the album much, especially “Interlude One.”
Cocktail Rating:  2.5 cocktails Two and half cocktails

Daily Duranie Video Review for Pressure Off!

Anyone see any good videos lately?  Anyone??  Anyone??  Bueller?  Obviously, we might have taken some time to watch a certain little video for Duran Duran’s Pressure Off a time or two thousand.  Then, of course, we took some more time to bring you all another of our ridiculous, why-don’t-we-ever-stop-talking video reviews of it!  While we could go on and on here in writing, we won’t.  We’ll just let the video speak for itself…after all, we talk enough for the video AND a written blog.  (Yes, it seems we are always very wordy!)  Enjoy!  snort

Now, you probably want to watch something much more…fun so we thought you might enjoy seeing Pressure Off again for the 38,456th time and then the 38,457th time and the 38,458th time…You get our point!

-A&R