Category Archives: Duran Duran fandom

It’s a Crush Panic: Lyrics Describing Duran Fandom

Duranies are so dang clever, I swear! The other day I posted a simple, little question on social media: “What Duran Duran lyric describes how you feel about the band?” We got a ton of responses on both Facebook and Twitter, which I loved to see. When I asked the question, I just wanted people to participate in the fan community. As a bonus, I also love reading Duran lyrics. All that said, it became super clear that this question shed a bit of light on our fandom, one that I was not expecting. It seems to me that I could put the responses into categories to help show what I learned!

Emotional connection:

“Your rhythm is the power to move me. It’s something you control, completely.”

“I think you’ll find it’s true. These words are like the sand, just get blown away. All the things we’d like to say. We need you.”

“You make me feel alive, alive, alive.”

“Some people call it a one night stand but we can call it paradise.”

“A smile that you can’t disguise. Every minute I keep finding clues that you leave behind.”

“You know you’re something special and you look like you’re the best.”

“All she wants is…MORE!”

“My immaculate dream, made breath and skin..”

“The price of my blue star eyed weakness…”

“Like a birthday or a pretty view…but then I’m sure that you know it’s just for you.”

“A hit to fit reality. It’s just a state of mind and you, and it, it’s more than just. And that’s what you’ve got to find. We’ll make you spin. We’ll make you sweat. All you have to do is choose me. And if you would try an alternative high, then tell me, what have we got to lose now?”

“Maybe it’s something they put in your perfume or the look in your eyes”

“Now you’re on the sandman everyday. Dancing with the bulls in any old way. Running like a fox…”

“Hold my hand. Please understand me. You’re never alone…”

“And your telephones been ringing while you’re dancing in the rain”

“So easy to disturb with a thought, with a whisper”

“Wild boys always shine”

“You’ve gone too far this time…”

“You shine where others fade…”

“…and we’re gonna go to space, kid, cause I’m leaving with an astronaut!”

“Save a prayer till the morning after”

“Waiting…”

“And she wonders how she ever got here as she goes under again”

“I may be a deluded fool but still fascinated”

“But now I feel your presence in a way I could not know”

“It doesn’t have to be serious”

“Must be lucky whether when you find the kind of wind that you. Come on. Show me all the light and shade that made your name.”

“Chill, is it something real or the magic I’m feeding off your fingers?”

What you want the band to do or know:

“Is there something I can say to make you come my way?”

“And it hurts me to think you might never know that I’ve got this thing about you.”

“My obsessive fascination is in your imagination!”

“Because you’re lonely in your nightmare, let me in and there’s heat beneath your winter, let me in.”

“…in case you don’t understand, there’s something else I meant to tell you, there is nothing better than being with you.”

“I love you so much, I keep your cigarette butts.”

“I do what I do to have you”

“The music’s between us”

“Don’t say you’re easy on me, you’re about as easy as a nuclear war”

“I know this is real, believe it. We belong together. Whatever happens you’re gonna be with me forever”

Song Titles:

“Wild boys.”

“What are the chances.”

“All you need is now”

“Notorious”

“Faith in this colour”

“Big Bang Generation”

“So Misled”

“New Religion”

Childhood/Teenage Years/Good Times:

“And you sway in the moon the way you did when you were younger, when we told everybody all you need is now.”

“Everybody everywhere feel it in the air. It’s time to take the pressure off!”

Now, in fairness, my categories are not perfect. Obviously, for example, some of the song titles are also lyrics, for instance. That said, I thought it was interesting how people responded to the question. Some people clearly went for a positive, why I love the band, which is cool. Others seemed to pick lyrics that would speak to the band from the fans. What also interested me is that not all of the lyrics were completely positive. For example, “so misled” could be a dig that the band isn’t what they thought. Same thing could be said about the nuclear war lyric. I think, overall, the answers show that there is a diversity of thought about the band and fandom, which is cool. All in all, I enjoyed the heck out of the super smart responses and plan to ask more questions like this. It was fun! I wouldn’t be surprised if I don’t decide to do something else with these lyrics, too.

What did you all think? Did you enjoy the question? Do you have suggestions for other questions?

-A

Built on Hope and Burnt by the Sun

I had hoped that the summer would bring me more time to be involved and to be thinking about any and everything in Duranland. The last couple of weeks have definitely fulfilled that goal. There has been a lot more thinking, writing, discussing Duran, for sure. Interestingly enough, it has made me question some things rather than just bring me back into the fandom fold. Questioning isn’t a bad thing but different from what I thought would happen.

When I think about my history in this fandom, I go back to 2004 and what I wanted then. When I jumped in online, the reasoning was a simple one. I wanted to make friends and I wanted people to go to shows with. That’s it. Nothing more and nothing less. Did I accomplish that? I have met a ton of people through this fandom. There is no doubt about that. I couldn’t have been more excited and happy. I remember this feeling of utter contentment. Some of those friends did attend shows with me and many of them remain as people I would still list as friends even if we don’t speak much anymore. Of course, Rhonda is the big exception.

Speaking of, we quickly discovered that we could tour together easily and have so much fun. I never laugh so much than when I am with her. So fandom in 2004 and 2005 was just joy. Of course, this perfectly coincided with the conclusion of graduate school, which meant more time and money. Life felt pretty good. I was filled with hope that this could continue indefinitely. Naive is probably the best word to describe how I was then. Soon enough, as 2005 turned to 2006, cracks in the pavement (pun intended) started to appear. I began to notice that not all fans got along with each other and definitely felt the wrath of those who believed that I did not express my fandom appropriately, at all times. On top of that, the reunion excitement fizzled as Andy left and the Red Carpet Massacre era brought division.

Hope remained high still for me. Those intensely positive memories from the Astronaut era offered protection against the negatives even when I began to worry that I was all alone or would be all alone soon enough. I remember making the decision to go see the band during their Broadway run in New York City in 2007 as the band promoted RCM. I went with a college friend who knew next to nothing about Duran but was excited to see me and wanted to support my interests. I had a good time (as I would at any Duran show) but it wasn’t the same.

By the fall of 2008, my hope began to return as Rhonda and I began studying fandom. If I understand this social phenomenon, I thought then I could do what needs to be done to keep it all positive. Then, the All You Need Is Now era began and, for the most part, my life in Duranland was great. It wasn’t perfect but it was pretty good. I went to the most shows ever and had a chance to see the band in the UK. We began to do meet ups and even planned a convention, hoping these events might bring friendships and joy to other Duranies like we had and that the fan community might be a more positive place.

Paper Gods brought a lot more shows and new friends. However, as the fandom wheel continued to go around, I found myself relying on shows and touring as my main means of escape and joy. Fandom provided the balance to the ever increasing stressfulness of my job and the real world. But I began to realize that the balance that fandom brought was delicate. Real life began to feel like I was walking on a very thin railing and hoping that I wouldn’t fall off. If I could make it to the shows or to a tour, it would feel like I made it across the railing to get to firmer ground. Yet, that firmer ground was getting shorter and less fun. It felt like I needed fandom differently than I had in the beginning. In 2004, I needed it for fun. By 2017, I needed it to keep me from falling into a deep, dark hole of sadness and loneliness.

Realizing this, I began to look around. Was fandom still providing me the same things that it once did? Was it bringing me new friends? Yes, I know people but I’m not sure how many of them I feel particularly close to or feel like I can rely on. So, I did what I had to do and focused some of my attention and energy on friendships outside of Duranland. What about going to shows? I still have people to go to shows with but those shows are getting harder and harder. Lately, it has always meant a long day of travel and the stress of missing work and flying. I have to wonder how much is it worth it. Yet, I fear that once I stop traveling to shows, those goals from 2004 will go up in smoke. It was the mark the end. Now, I am still a fan and will always be one. I just have to wonder if the days, my days in this fandom are numbered. In 2007, a lot of the friends I had made in 2004 and 2005 were walking away and now I feel that same sense. I pushed through then and kept hope alive but I’m not sure that I can now. I’m tired. I’m tired of being the consistently there and consistently strong one. I have to do that in real life so I don’t know that I can do it in fandom, too.

Now, I have been around long enough to know that how I feel right now may not be how I will feel next month or next year. Maybe I will have the most amazing time in Vegas in September that I cannot imagine myself not traveling to see shows. If the timeline about new music coming out next year is at all accurate, that might keep me around for another cycle. After all, I still think it would be cool to see the band play in the UK for their 40th, if that were to happen. This I do know. I cannot force any of it. I cannot control what the band does, what my friends do or how I feel. So, for now, I will try to keep that initial hope alive.

-A

Been Under Quiet Attack

Sometimes, fandom feels like an endurance test. It like the world and everything and everyone in it is just to push you away from fandom. For some people, they might opt to leave, to avoid, to hide. I, on the other hand, am feeling feisty, determined. I’m digging in my heels.

It has never been easy to be a Duran Duran fan. I am sure that a lot of people would think I’m insane for saying that. After all, at one point, they were the most popular band in the world. They were everywhere and you could buy merchandise upon merchandise in the mid-1980s U.S. Yet, for me, it didn’t always feel awesome. Sure, it was great fun with my friend as we watched Sing Blue Silver for the millionth time in her TV room but sucked that other kids at school talked smack about them along with countless DJs, music critics, and random strangers. “Aww…that band sucks. Can they even play their own instruments? Must be rough to be put together by a management company. What’s with the eyeliner? What are they gay?” were just some of the rude and untruth comments I was exposed to both then and now. It didn’t make me turn away from Duran but made me more determined to love them.

Then, of course, the mid to late 1980s was not always kind to the band and their fans. I saw my best friend walk away from the fandom. All the fans had to watch Duran regroup after side projects but also with the departure of Roger and Andy. On top of that, life often got in the way to the point where I found myself moving on while holding on to the that sliver of being a fan. Could I? Would I return to the really join the fan community? I wasn’t certain especially as the 1990s grew older but I know that when I took the time to watch and listen to Duran my love endured even if I remained pretty isolated as a fan.

Of course, I jumped back in with two feet along with countless others as the band reunited. I believed that this would be the best ever. Not only was I thrilled that the beloved Fab Five was back, I looked forward to getting to know more and more fans to share my love with others. Sadly, I also assumed that Duran’s longevity would result in nothing but acceptance and kudos from the music critics and the public as a whole. As we know, that didn’t always happen. Yes, they received more public acclaim than they had previously but they are never quite totally respected. On top of that, I found myself battling on a new front. Now, it seemed that others criticized my fandom because I’m “too old”. I should have let that go as a kid, people would imply. It certainly should not interfere with real life or all those responsibilities.

Still, I figured that I could blow off all those music critics, journalists, and nosey people in my own life as long as the fan community provided nothing but acceptable and joy. Sometimes, it has. I have had tremendous moments in which everything just feels right. I remember looking around, for example, at various points of Durandemonium, the convention that Rhonda and I organized, and thought how amazing it all was. Another example is when it seemed like the entire venue was clapping along to the Man Who Stole a Leopard in Glasgow in December of 2011. Sometimes, I have had it when we have held our online parties. It can be the best time ever.

Yet, there have been other times that it feels like I have battle both the outside world and the inside one. Yes, Rhonda and I chose to express our fandom by writing this blog, by organizing fan events, etc. It’s cool that it is not everyone’s cup of tea. Maybe some people don’t want us to do this or that. Others might not always like who we are or what we have to say. That’s okay, too. That said, I’m not going to stop loving Duran, who I am or how I express my fandom. I’m more determined than ever to stick around, do what I do and love the band with all of my being. I’m looking forward to partying hard in a couple of months at some great shows with my friends. Then, all of the obstacles put in my way will get pushed to the side and all that will remain is what started all of this to begin with.

-A

To hear the drum

Over the weekend, I chatted back and forth with another Duranie about drumsticks. She’d gotten Roger’s sticks recently, and I’d congratulated her on social media, mentioning that I don’t even have a pair. Somehow over the years, I’ve never been that lucky. There was one time I came close, though. Another, much taller man right beside me grabbed them in midair, and you know – that’s the way it goes. After that, I realized it was silly to keep trying. Someone always wants them a little more, or is a little luckier in the process.

Anyway, this person was thrilled to have secured sticks from Roger. She encouraged me to keep trying for them, and asked where I’d be sitting at the upcoming shows I’m attending. I explained that in most cases, I’m really too far back. Although I’ve had front row a few times now, I haven’t tried for sticks.

I thought about that after our conversation ended. Roger was my favorite band member from the first moments I became a fan. He still IS my favorite, but it’s different in adulthood than in teen years—at least for me. For a few years, I held up signs for him at shows, but I don’t do that anymore. I don’t know when it stopped, or why. On second thought, I do know about when, and certainly why I left the signs at home. I became more aware of the fact that due to this site – more people knew me. I’ve always been a bit self-conscious, and that hasn’t changed with age.

Jungle drums they all clear the way for me

Fandom for me, is a tangled mess. That much, I know for sure. Part of it is, I’m well-aware that I write a fan blog. That alone is enough to make people smirk, and yes – it bothers me. I mean, it’s one thing to say you’re a huge fan. Even that might get grins when you’re amongst people who don’t really understand there is life after the age of 30 or even 40. Then when they ask how many shows you’ve gone to. I usually say “around 50”. The expressions change from amusement to almost concern, and then back to a smirky, snarky, sort of partial grin. But then, if I dare go one further (and I don’t always) by announcing that I run a fan blog/website dedicated to Duran Duran fans, that’s when the eyes roll and I can see a slight recoil, as though they’re trying to back away. This comes in especially handy at family gatherings, and workplace events for my husband.

In all seriousness though, I don’t like the characterization much. I’m pretty sure I’m not a crazy person, but the very second one backs up a statement such as “Not only have I gone to a lot of concerts, but I own and operate a fan blog dedicated to Duran Duran”, with a phrase like,“I’m not crazy, though”, it’s too late. My fate, and the corresponding label, already been granted. I must be one of those certifiably crazy obsessive fans.

Just a toy that you keep at home

I suppose that while there were a number of reasons why I stopped asking for sticks – one big one was because I thought that the more obsessive I acted, the more I asked for stuff, the less-serious people would take the blog. I didn’t want to be the punchline in someone’s joke.

Here’s a little nugget I’ve learned, but still wrestle with, over the nine years we’ve blogged. It doesn’t matter. At this point, people have already made their decisions about Daily Duranie, and particularly about me as a person. Holding up signs, asking for sticks, pictures, or even hugs from people I care about, isn’t going to make a bit of difference. People either like the blog, or they discount it completely. My internal struggle, or my anxiety, comes from knowing I can’t change any of it, but wishing that I could. For me, I think that constant inner tug-of-war is my Achilles heel. I seek approval and acceptance, from everyone, everywhere. It is an impossible task.

Several years ago, I asked Dom for a guitar pick before he left the stage after a concert. Not only did he flick the one he had been using my way (amazingly enough, I caught it), but he sent his guitar tech out to throw the rest of his picks from his mic stand at me. Other people eagerly grabbed those, but I didn’t care because I had the one he’d used just two minutes prior. I still have that pick in my jewelry box. I’ve never known what else to really do with it. I think the memories of getting it, or running into him after a show and having him come over to say hi, or giving me a quick hug in a hallway, are more precious to me than the pick itself.

With the strays and the damaged

I don’t know if I’ll ever hold up a sign for Roger again. I still feel weird about doing it, even though I know I probably shouldn’t. Also, I don’t know if having sticks would really make a difference. Would it make me feel like any more of a fan? Probably not. Don’t get me wrong – getting sticks is cool, but is it any more exciting than speaking to him at a signing? I’m really not sure much could top that moment for me, and it’s just a memory at this point. I don’t even have video or recording of our brief conversation. My point is, maybe someone else really wants them and needs them. I wouldn’t feel right about taking them when I know of someone else who has desperately wanted them.

I have so much work to do, personally. My anxiety, while better now that I’m living in a semi-rural and peaceful place, still plagues me more than I want to admit. I continue worrying about how other people see me, see the blog, or see my fandom, entirely too much. I’m a work in progress, but I’m getting there.

-R

I’ve Got My Own Way

I am a John Taylor fan.  He is my favorite.  I’m wiling to bet that you probably don’t even know that.  I’m not one to shout it from the rooftop or anywhere else.  Why is that?  I suspect it has to do with something Rhonda mentioned last week on the blog.  There are a lot of John fans out there.  I’m one of a million.  Rhonda implied that the competition over John is a fierce one and one that she is glad that she is not a part of.  I get that.  I think it is part of the reason that I’m rather shy when it comes to my admiration of the Bass God.  

Like many Duranies out there, I became a John girl in the 1980s.  In fact, I would point out that it was the video for the Reflex that did it.  At the time, I was super young.  Like nine.  Less than a decade old.  My best friend at the time also decided that John was the one for her.  I have later learned that we were weird, super unusual.  Why?  I guess that most friend groups in the 80s were such that no two friends could have the same favorite.  It was like there was an unwritten rule based on the idea that we would all grow up to marry this man of our dreams.  Since that was the case, there could only be one Mrs. Nick Rhodes.  You cannot have two Mrs. John Taylors.  So, people had to pick a unique choice.  Now, I’m uncertain how friend groups decided who gets what band member as their favorite.  Loudest friend got the first choice?  Most popular?  First person to pick?  No clue.  Anyway, my friend and I did not do that.  If I had to guess why, I think we were just too young.  While we learned that we should be thinking about the man we were going to marry, we didn’t learn that we should compete over that guy, if necessary.  So, it was cool to us to both like the same guy.  In fact, I might even say that it was reassuring to me to like the same guy as my friend. It meant that my taste was “right” or “good”.

Now, though, I’m no longer 9 years old.  I am well aware that women are subtly taught to compete for men.  I could argue that the reason that I don’t shout about my favorite is because I don’t want to compete against other women.  While part of that is true, for sure, there is more to it.  It has more to do with me.  I really don’t compete because I believe that I will lose so the best plan is not to play at all.  I think this belief of mine plays a pretty big role in how I express my fandom beyond not shouting about being a John. It definitely affects how I express my fandom on social media.

So what do I mean by “cannot win”?  What does winning look like on social media amongst Duranies?  Good question.  I don’t have a good answer but one could say that winning would be being well liked.  How do fans become well-liked?  I, at one point, thought it was that you knew a lot.  I don’t think that does it unless what you know proves you know a lot about the music (to the fans that really dig this aspect of Duranland) or it is that you have insider info or can give news alerts.  I do know a lot about Duran history but I cannot tell you details about who produced what track or what different remixes are out there.  I have no insider connections and don’t have time to give every little piece of news.  How else could people become well-liked on social media?  From my observation, another means is to be witty, funny or make cool Duran references.  Sometimes, I am okay at that but usually I have to be really comfortable with the crowd around me first.  Social media isn’t going to cut it.  I am assume that I don’t have anything super interesting to say so I don’t say much at all.  

Does this attitude include responding to “official” people’s posts including DDHQ? I sometimes think about responding and then literally the next thought is, “What would I post that would offer something of interest or substance?”  Then, I realize that I would just be repeating others and not in any cool way so I don’t.  This feeling was ten times worse when John Taylor was on twitter.  What the hell would he care what I have to say?  Though, it is funny that I don’t have the same concerns when I post about things that I feel very competent in (history, politics, education).  In those settings, I rarely shut up.  But for whatever reason I hold myself back when it comes to fandom and the subtle competition that exists.  (I know…some will deny that social hierarchy exists.  Those comments only reinforce what I know about fandom and social hierarchy.)

Two questions emerge.  First, does this make my fandom or love for Duran and John any less?  Second, do I wish to change this situation?  As for the first question, my fandom is not any less than any others even though I don’t show it in the way that many others do.  I do write this blog after all.  They must matter a lot to me.  My love for John Taylor hasn’t really varied since my 9 year old self fell for him more than 3 decades ago.  Do I wish to change this?  In some ways, yes, and in others…I’m okay.  Do I wish that there was less competition in fandom?  Absolutely. Would that make me feel more comfortable? 100%.  It is part of the reason that I blog, plan events, etc.  The more fans come together, the less competition exists.  I definitely wish that there was less judgement.  In saying all that, I acknowledge that I’m not perfect in those areas and must work on them myself.  Do I wish that I responded differently and be less worried about being accepted or liked?  Sure and I can work on changing some of that, too, while I push to make Duranland a happier place.

-A

I’m a Hostage to That…

Yesterday, Rhonda and I took time out of our summer schedules (I use that word loosely!) to catch up via Skype.  Funny how when I think about what we caught up on, a lot of it was focused on Duran Duran.  Did you see pictures from Iceland?  What do you think about that Kennedy Space Center show? and lots more.  Pathetic?  Dedicated?  I suspect that question was determined a LONG time ago.  Of course, we also talked a little about Vegas and the Duran shows in September.  While we have tickets, it is time to start thinking about other specifics.  Watch this space for more discussion on those Vegas shows tomorrow!  Anyway, as we started thinking about the blog and writing, we pondered a couple of questions that we posed on social media.  What drew you to Duran Duran?  What led people to become Duran Duran fans?  

A lot of people responded (THANK YOU!) and some themes jumped out to me.  I also have some follow up questions!  (That is probably not shocking in the least!)

FRIENDS and/or FAMILY:

When asked the question about how/why people became fans, a lot of people talked how someone else got them hooked.  In some cases, it was a simple case of having a friend or relative be into the band and play a song or album or show a video that did the trick.  Rhonda’s sister even chimed in to say that her sister was to blame!  I appreciated the heck out of the person that commented about the peer pressure in middle school.  At the height of Duranieness, it was super hard to avoid seeing and/or hearing about the band.  They were everywhere and a LOT of people loved them.  I’m not surprised, then, that there was pressure to be into them as well.  I, for one, am thankful that I was too young to recognize all that popularity.  If not, I probably would have rejected them simply because of that.  What can I say—I like being different and hate following the crowd!

MUSIC:

Obviously, a lot of fans chimed in to talk about how the music did it for them.  Lots of people mentioned falling for specific songs like Ordinary World, The Reflex, Girls on Film, Friends of Mine, Hungry Like the Wolf, Planet Earth, Is There Something I Should Know, Tel Aviv, Night Boat and Lonely In Your Nightmare.  I love that so many different songs were listed.  It wasn’t just one or two songs that drew people to the band.  Most of them were from the first three albums with the exception of Ordinary World.  A couple of people described what they liked about the music but I want to know more.  What about the music?  Is the instrumentation?  Lyrics?  Vocals?  What caused you to be emotionally connected to the music?  For example, I know that for me, the songs just got into my head.  They were catchy enough that they produced a ton of ear worms.  

VIDEO:

After music, the next most common answer I saw was about the videos.  Again, this does not surprise me in the least!  After all, Duran videos are amazing.  Again, many fans talked about specific ones like Rio, Hungry Like the Wolf, Ordinary World, Is There Something I Should Know, Planet Earth, The Reflex and Union of the Snake.  Of course, many, many, many people commented about how…attractive the band members were, especially their favorites.  Yep, I totally can relate to that.  John Taylor in the Reflex, anyone?  Would those good looks have been enough?  Was there something more special about the videos that attracted you besides the good looking band members?  

IMAGES ALL OVER:

Some fans talked about seeing the band on TV or magazines.  It is definitely true that the band was everywhere at the peak of their popularity.  In connection to this, people mentioned being attracted to the band’s style and even lifestyle.  Again, I can relate to this but I wonder what aspect of their style did it?  What did their lifestyle seem like?  Why would that be attractive?  

All in all, I feel like I could relate to so many of the responses.  I, too, fell for the band due to the music, videos and style.  I had friends who were into the band, too.  That said, I have some follow up questions to know more specifics!  I am hoping that people will continue to want to share.  I don’t know why anyone wouldn’t, right?  Who doesn’t love talking about why they adore Duran? On that note, look for more questions coming your way!

-A

P.S. I want to give an update on the question of the day.  As I am sure that you know, our site struggled last weekend.  Now, it is working for everyone…except me.  It is the weirdest dang thing.  It works for me when I am not at home.  When I am at home, it doesn’t, no matter what device I use.  It has to be something about my wifi.  Anyone have any ideas?  I will keep playing with it.  Until I get it figured out, the questions will be on hold.  Boo.

Ah, That Die-Hard Fan Thing

Please, please tell me now

Last week, a friend of mine asked if I thought one could even be considered a die hard fan if they weren’t upset about John leaving the band back in the late 1990s.

Granted, the comment, or rather, the question, was said in jest. At the time, I said I wouldn’t touch the subject with a ten-foot pole.

Maybe what I should have said was that I wouldn’t touch the subject unless I were planning on writing a blog in advance, knowing I wouldn’t be around to manage the aftermath!!

Is there something I should know?

Seriously though – in answering that question, I think one has to have an idea of what “die-hard” even means. Funnily enough, I think we all have an image of what that might entail in our own heads. Maybe you think a die-hard is someone who doesn’t miss a tour. Perhaps you believe a die-hard fan travels to all the shows, or maybe they’re someone that many within the fan community know and recognize.

Truth be told, I don’t think there’s one set definition, and as I explained last week – I’m definitely not going to be the person to start defining it. At the very least…… I won’t be doing that while I’m sober! We all have our own ideas of what a die hard fan is. Chances are, we either think we fit that definition and are proud of it, or we work very hard to tell ourselves that we’re not…THAT kind of fan.

For many fans, the day John left the band was one of the saddest days of their lives. Others felt that way when it was Roger, or Andy…either time. For still many others though, they didn’t notice the absence all that much. Maybe John wasn’t a favorite, or maybe their attitude was simply that as long as Simon is singing, it’s Duran Duran. I can remember going to see Duran Duran at the House of Blues in 2001. I purposefully kept my eyes on Simon and Nick, willing myself to believe I was seeing all five original members, ignoring Warren and the others onstage. It was utterly ridiculous now that I think back on it, but I was a young(er) pup then. What about you?

People stare and cross the road from me

Opinions and loyalties are often the spark applied to the powder keg of arguments when it comes to fandom. None of us are unbiased. If we were, chances are, we wouldn’t be fans at all – much less hold that super special, “die-hard” label. My own personal opinion is that if you’re a fan of Duran Duran – then you’re a fan of the band. Die-hard, casual fan, or blogger! It shouldn’t matter whether or not you were upset that John left. Others might believe that only the die-hardest (that’s a word, right?!?) of them all would feel as though John’s absence was like missing part of your heart.

Quite frankly, it is all pretty dramatic for me on a Monday (because that’s when I’m writing this) afternoon. It isn’t even wine-o’clock yet!

Someday, when I least expect it, someone will hand me many vodka tonics and then ask the fateful question, “What is the definition of a die-hard fan, Rhonda?”

That’s liable to be a rough one.

-R

Yeah, It’s Just a Story

Until about thirty seconds ago, this morning was shaping up to be one of those days when blogging was going to be like pulling teeth. I had no ideas coming to me, and I was toying with the idea of just saying forget it and taking the day off. But then I remembered what I did yesterday afternoon!

I think most everyone knows we moved from Rancho Santa Margarita, California up to the central coast – we live in a smaller town now, and kind of went from typical “OC suburban” living to country living. For example, I now have twelve chickens and we just spent the past month or so clearing annual brush because we live in a high fire danger area. In any case, it has been a life-changing exercise for the past five months. While we’ve unpacked a lot, we still have a lot of yellow and black plastic bins in our garage that have yet to be opened. I look at them nearly every day, think “Oh, I should probably grab a couple and get it done.” Then I skip back into the house and find something far more fun to do, like binging on TV, reading a book, or blogging!

Details make you shiver

This plan went well up until yesterday. My well-meaning husband decided the day had come to get my car into the garage. I’m sure this has a lot to do with the fact that after years of no car payments, we had no choice but to buy a new (gently used, but new to me) vehicle last weekend. We’ll just call that “motivation”. That meant moving bins around, getting rid of some of the extra things we don’t need, and insisting that I unpack some of those yellow and black boxes that have grown to be the bane of my existence over the past year.

In addition to the bins in the garage, there were two, very heavy, very full bins in our bedroom that I’d been ignoring. Quite literally, they were beginning to feel like furniture themselves, as I’d use them as a sort of resting place for things I needed to put away – like clothes, or maybe my purse, or even books and magazines. In my defense, the reason I hadn’t unpacked these two (actually three) bins away is because they contained a good portion of my Duran Duran memorabilia, and I had nowhere to put it all.

One of the bins contained music. All of the band’s CD’s, and a ridiculous number of gig bootlegs. I don’t know how many I have – but there are a lot. Another bin contained DVD’s. Again, I feel like maybe it’s out of hand at this point. Then the last bin contained print articles I’ve collected. Magazines, newspapers, a few posters, notes I’ve gotten from a couple of special friends, packets from conventions I’ve both attended and helped organize, and even a couple of tour books that somehow found their way into this bin rather than the one I already unpacked containing all of my fandom and Duran Duran books.

It’s hard to escape

I didn’t know what to do with all of this…STUFF. I felt overwhelmed just looking at all of it. No, it didn’t really spark JOY (thank you Marie Kondo) it mostly stoked a fire of anxiety over not having my own space. The thing is, my youngest has her own space. My husband has HIS own space. I have my closet, which is significantly smaller than the one I had before. We do have a guest room, but for reasons I can’t get into at the moment, I don’t dare claim it as my own just yet. I stared at the boxes and piles of music. I thought about putting all of the music on a hard drive. That would take a long time. I considered shoving the entire thing up into the attic. That goes against the rules I self-imposed. We’re not storing crap for the sake of storing it. I took a deep breath, knowing what would have to happen.

I had my husband haul our old armoire back into the house.

We’d agreed to get rid of some old furniture when we moved. We haven’t done much of that yet, though. So, back in with the old. I needed a cabinet, and the armoire was going to serve the purpose well. As I unpacked the bins and put everything into it’s new home, I wondered what other fans did. Do people still collect things? Not everyone can be Durandy and just rent a storage unit, am I right?

So, while I pondered, I unpacked. Everything fit into the newly designated “Duran Duran Armoire”. It’s not that pretty, but it works, I guess. I can access everything pretty easily, which is an improvement from our old house. Seriously though, what does everyone else do with their stuff??

When your head is stuck in vice

I think it’s one thing when you live alone and can designate a closet or room – but I’ve been lucky to even have a desk (which I don’t right now). I had an office in our old house for about four months one time over the twenty-one years we lived there. It was great, but obviously short lived. Once my husband lost his job and needed space for a serious job search, me, my memorabilia, and my Duran Duran posters were unceremoniously kicked out. Back to the kitchen table I went, laptop in arms.

It is a problem that has continued with this house for sure. We have one extra room for an office, and since he works from home – it has to be his. I even tried arguing that since the garage is well-insulated, (his words when we bought the house, which I cleverly stored away in my brain for later use!)we could easily turn part of it into a lovely office space for him. Oddly, he wasn’t having any part of that. I cannot imagine why!

We do have a small area upstairs that could be turned into an office “area”, but I wouldn’t have wall space for posters or anything like that – it’s too out in the open. Last night I tried convincing him to turn part of our attic into an office for me, but we can’t really stand up in there, and the whole “no ventilation” thing is a problem too. Go figure, I do need to be able to breathe, darn it. So me, and my nearly lifelong obsession don’t really have a good home. Until I figure it out, I’m here at one end of our kitchen island, attempting to write.

It’s everywhere

Is it just me lugging boxes and boxes of Duran Duran-everything around?? What does one do with all of this stuff?? First world problem?! Of course. I mean, the whole thing about having a favorite band at all is kind of several feet in that direction anyway, isn’t it?

Perhaps I should have taken him up on using the chicken coop as my office back when I had the chance. Dang it.

-R

Don’t They Understand

I don’t really hide my fandom much. My family and friends all know that I’m a Duranie. Heck, a number of my students even know that I’m a big fan. My wallpaper on my work computer is a group picture, after all. Recently, I found myself out with friends, many of them work friends. It is almost inevitable that Duran Duran will come up in conversation. Lately, when the band comes up, a friend or two will say something like, “I would love to go to a show with you!” Then, for the next few minutes, multiple friends will say how fun it would be! In those situations, I find myself not saying much beyond having a little smile on my face. Why don’t I say something? Do I worry about what they are thinking about me? Do I want to share the band with them? What about sharing my fandom?

Generally, the people who say that they would love, love, love to attend a Duran concert with me are those whom I am pretty close friends with. They do know how much the band and the fandom means to me. This leads me to think that they aren’t making fun of me but…I do wonder if there isn’t a little piece of them that would like to see me in this very different way. I suspect that they have a hard time imagining me as a fan since they see me as this very serious teacher or activist. Do they think I go completely wild? That I lose control? Act totally differently? I’m not sure what ideas go through their minds about me and my Duranie status. Those of you who know me or have seen me in person know that I have a great time at shows and on tour but I don’t think I have a totally different personality. *shrugs*

Could it be that I don’t want to share the band and the fandom with them? That is an interesting idea. Let me ponder what it would mean for my local friends to go to a show with me. In almost all cases, this equals traveling. My friends would need to hop on a plane with me to see the concert or two. That is a serious level of financial commitment that I don’t expect anyone to do unless you love the band. Then, when I go to a Duran show, I go for good seats. I might not try for those $1000 ultimate front row seats but I generally go for Gold. Again, that is a lot of money especially for a non-Duranie. Then, of course, I don’t like the image of that. I prefer that fans get the best seats. I would hate for a friend of mine to take a seat that a serious Duranie could have instead.

All right. Let’s assume that my friends would be willing to travel and willing to spend the money for tickets, would I want them to go? If not, why not? After all, I have no problem with any and all of my friends going to see bands like Depeche Mode or the Killers with me. What’s the difference with Duran?

First, Duran Duran is not just another band to me. They matter a LOT to me. (Obviously, I write this blog.) Now, I’m certain that if my friends were to go, they would have a blast. They would fall for Duran and see how amazing they are live. All this should make me want my friends to go. After all, wouldn’t it be awesome to have more Duranie friends? Of course…yet, I still hold back, sort of. Looking at this situation, I have no problem with friends going to the show. I would like that actually. I’m just not sure that they should go with me.

First of all, this would feel wrong to me. I typically go to shows with Rhonda. That is the way it is supposed to be. After all, we have seen well over 30 shows together. This doesn’t mean that we go to every show together. When we go without each other, it always feels a little weird. Second, going to a show is more than the 2 hours the band is on stage. It is a much bigger event. On show days, I revolve everything around the show. When to get ready? What to wear? What time to meet others? All of that works to increase my excitement and to bring me closer to the other fans I am going with but also the other fans that I look forward to seeing.

I think back to the first time Rhonda and I had front row at a general admission show in Biloxi in 2012. We got up at the crack of dawn to get ready and to head to the venue to wait and wait and wait some more. We recorded a video at like 7 am of us talking to each other about how dumb we were to do this. Of course, we laughed while we said that and continued to get ready. Even if we were dumb, we didn’t head back to sleep. Then, as we stood in line all day, we talked with other fans, watched a Diamond in the Mind on computer, made up a setlist. We participated in all of these activities as if they were steps in some sort of religious ceremony or holiday. Would my friends get that?

What if they did attend a pre-show party? Would they have fun? More importantly, would they be able to contribute to the conversation? After all, it is likely that there would be discussion about Duran happenings from things like the setlist to studio news to fashion choices, etc. Maybe people would talk about previous shows or times that they met the band members. Now, my friends are smart people. If nothing else, maybe they would be fascinated by the whole thing. After all, the social scientist in me watches a lot and ponders the state of our fandom They might do something similar. Yet, I think that I would feel like I had to be the go between, the translator. I would have to make sure that everyone was happy. When I go to a Duran show, that is time that is just for me. It isn’t about doing for others. I spend a lot of time worrying about other people like my family, my students, my colleagues, etc. Being on tour allows me time for me.

I also think another reason I might want to keep my work friends from entering the world of Duran Duran fandom is because I need those worlds to be separate. My fandom world needs to bring me fun. My work friends help me get through the daily challenges of teaching teenagers in a large, urban school district. I don’t really want the reality of my job to sneak into my fun.

So, for now, I’ll just nod when this comes up in conversation but I won’t ever really push it. I like it the way it is as it is.

-A

We Light a Spark

Do you ever get tired of it? You know…bickering about the band? Rehashing topic after topic?

This post isn’t about this blog. We write daily, and we try to write about different ideas, bring different angles, and sometimes, we even end up changing our own views about a previous topic. There is a challenge to writing daily, even though Amanda and I split the writing duties. It isn’t always that easy to come up with something new to write about, particularly during times where the band isn’t necessarily “active” outside of the studio, or if they’re on hiatus. When we started Daily Duranie, we recognized the challenge would be the “daily” part. For the past eight years and seven months (who’s counting?), we’ve stayed committed. It definitely isn’t my blog that I’m pondering. Writing is my joy.

A drop of blood on evil beach

Lately, but I’ve seen a dedicated effort to rehash nearly every single “hot button” topic regarding Duran Duran. Is it due to downtime? There’s nothing really “new” to discuss, yet fans want to talk Duran. It is easy to get a conversation started when someone posts a volatile blanket statement about who is the most important member of the band, or blasts into a tirade over various personnel over the years. Don’t we get tired of it?

The thing is, when I look at the people starting the conversations, they’re not names I typically recognize. I’m one of the admins for a DD fan Facebook group, and we still have people requesting to be admitted into the group almost every day. Whether these fans are my age and just haven’t been active, or they’re much younger and are just discovering the band, for the most part it is fair to say that they’re new to this part of fandom.

Here lies the misadventure

Back in 2000, as I made my own first forays into the world of online fandom, I can remember the message boards constantly abuzz with topics just like what I see today on Facebook or even Twitter. The activity was constant. The debates and the occasionally very heated arguments were par for the course. Then the noise started to settle, and people drifted to social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. Some fans floated away completely. Maybe they still went to shows but didn’t participate in the online community portion. Perhaps, as several of my own friends have done, they got their fill, and moved on completely.

Yet, here we are in 2019, and there are still very active posts on Facebook with many participants discussing guitarists, the most important member(s) in Duran Duran, and even songs that should have been included on various albums. While part of me is appalled and bored with the discussion, because “dang it haven’t we already beaten this topic to death?!?”, another part of me realizes that the problem isn’t with the posts at all.

I’ve been an active “online community” fan for 19 years now. I don’t know about the rest of you reading, but that seems like a crazy amount of time. It doesn’t feel like 19 years – the time went by in the blink of an eye. When I first started participating, my two oldest kids were 3 and about 1. Heather, my oldest, is going to graduate from university in 10 days, and my son Gavin is in his second year. I didn’t even have my youngest yet!

Feel the same as you yourself

My point though, is that during that 19 years, I’ve written, posted, and talked a LOT. I’ve seen fans come and go. I’ve seen blogs and websites come and go, too. As crazy as it seems, when I think of the big picture – there does seem to be a bit of a fan cycle. People get energized, or even re-energized. They seek out information online. They connect with other people, then they talk about every possible Duran Duran topic under the sun. They go to shows, experience album cycles. At some point, they get tired of talking. Outside life pressures need more attention. Maybe they even get tired of participating with the community at large. They go to a show or two, but ultimately, they drift away. From what I’ve seen, particularly lately – there are always people with brand new energy, ready to take up that slack.

While sure, there are some people who rather enjoy posting the same information and photos, hoping to somehow get attention, there is also an influx of new and energized fans, ready to dissect the differences between band members, albums, and songs.

Truthfully, that’s the way we want it, too. My “get off my lawn” attitude aside, I’m recognizing that it’s all great. New blood is a good thing. Seeing people continue to write and talk about the nonsense of leaving “Beautiful Colors” off of Astronaut is something to be applauded. If it were left to the rest of us who have already had our fill of the hot topics- the fandom would slow to a trickle. It wouldn’t be “Planet Roaring” at all, now would it?

-R