Category Archives: history

Duran Duran History: Storytellers 2000

On this date in 2000, the VH1 show, Storytellers, aired in the UK.  Are you familiar with the concept of the show?  Wikipedia describes it in this way:  “In each episode artists perform in front of a (mostly small and intimate) live audience, and tell stories about their music, writing experiences and memories, somewhat similar to MTV Unplugged.”  The Duran Duran episode was the 58th and originally aired in June 25, 2000.

During this time, I was not paying a huge amount of attention to Duran Duran, sad to say.  I was deep in the midst of graduate school even during the summer.  Yet, my sister-in-law told me about the show before it aired.  She knew that I was a big fan and pointed out to me.  Of course, I tuned in then!  I couldn’t wait to see what songs they would play but also the stories behind the songs.

The show which you can see here is just short of an hour and featured many classic Duran tracks like Rio, Girls on Film, Hungry Like the Wolf, Notorious, A View to a Kill, Save a Prayer,  Playing with Uranium, Ordinary World, and Pop Trash Movie.  I think my favorite story actually was the free association the band did before Hungry Like the Wolf.  While it didn’t shed light to the creation of the song, it did amuse me a lot.  It shows how quick on the feet they are, which I love!

I truly appreciate the little behind-the-scenes of how the songs were created.  It reminds of the Classic Rio DVD, Songbook from 2009 and even what is featured on the extras of the All You Need Is Now CD/DVD.  It seems to me that no matter how many articles I read or how many shows like this I watch, I always learn something new.  This leads me to wonder.  If the band were to do another show like this, which songs do you think they should tell the stories for?  Part of me thought it would be good to do just post-2000 songs but then I realize that there are lots of other songs that I don’t know much about.

So, here is the challenge.  Like the show, pick out 9 number of songs that you would love for the band to shed some light on.  For Storytellers, they tended to focus on some big hits and their new material.  In this case, you could choose any of them.  Here is my list today (note–if I did this again tomorrow, my list might be completely different!):  Planet Roaring, Red Carpet Massacre, Secret Oktober (lyrically), Vertigo, Last Man Standing, The Universe Alone, New Moon on Monday, A Matter of Feeling, and Too Bad You’re So Beautiful.  What songs would you like to know more about their creation?  What would make your list??

-A

Keeping the Rhythm Going 28 Years and Counting: Liberty

Liberty was released on this date in 1990. My excellent math skills tell me that adds up to birthday #28 for this album. Back on the 25th anniversary, Simon posted some thoughts about Liberty on dd.com.  If you haven’t read it yet, you really should.

Liberty is one of those albums that feels like a guilty pleasure. I have been known to blast “Violence of Summer” on long drives, some of which may or may not have taken place at like 2am on the way home from gigs at the Key Club in Los Angeles. The word “overproduced” has been used in tandem with this album frequently over the years. At one point, I suppose I might have agreed. I tried to be one of those critical listeners that might be taken seriously. These days, however, I’m far more apt to say “So what??? I think it’s fun and I like it!”, than anything else. Life is far too short to worry about explaining why a song or two makes my heart sing.

The album is 28 years old. I think it might be fair to put the criticisms aside and just love the music. Frivolity and fun are not bad qualities. I happen to agree with Simon on “Serious”. It is by far one of the best Duran Duran songs ever recorded. It ranks right up with “Ordinary World”, and I applaud its simple beauty. “My Antarctica” is another stunning example of the band’s songwriting genius.  I don’t know what Simon meant by the lyrics, but when I think about them, they remind me of the saying “life happens when you’re making other plans”.  Simon seems to call out a relationship with someone who is set to have the public see his/her life one way when in fact it is completely another. I love the vagueness and how the words allow themselves to tell your own story. It is absolutely some of Duran Duran’s best work, and hits home with me far more than some of their major hits. It is a song I wish they’d play live.

There is plenty on the album to love. While Simon wasn’t fond of “All Along the Water”, I adore the song, even with its fair amount of cheek. Again – it’s FUN. It keeps me moving, and I’m certainly smiling. Is it lyrically captivating? Probably not as much as others, but not every song needs to punch me in the gut with emotion. I love it.

When I think about Liberty and this period of time, it makes sense to me when Simon says it felt like part of The Wedding Album. On my own Duran Duran timeline in my head – there’s not really much I remember about the time period for Liberty, only that it was released, and before I knew it the band was on to something else. Maybe they needed that album as a creative precursor to what came next, but I believe it is worthy of standing on its own and not be known as the “also appearing” album of the 1990’s. In fact, I’m going to give it a listen today!

-R

 

Classic Pop: Welcome and Conquering Planet Earth

Guess what came in the mail?!  That’s right.  My copy of the Classic Pop:  Duran Duran 40th Anniversary Edition magazine.  Right away, I can see that there is a LOT here as it is really over 100 pages.  Clearly, I won’t be able to read it all at once, not if I want to really take it in.  So, I will simply read one article at a time and discuss it then talk about the magazine as a whole.  After all, I can tell that the creators took time to worry about the details.  This can be easily seen because as soon as you open the magazine there are pictures of various album and single covers.  It reminds me, as a fan, about how much the band really has done.

Welcome:

I loved reading the welcome written by the editor.  Said to say that it is rare to read glowing words about Duran Duran outside of places like our blog or other fan creations.  Yet, this intro was all that and more.  Clearly, the editor views Duran as a band who has had adversity but has worked hard to be successful.  “They’ve marked out by a peerless flair for melodic songwriting as well as a remarkable resilience, digging in and clinging to their dreams when the naysayers foolishly try to write them off.”  Exactly.  Then, before the first article, the magazine acknowledges the graphic design and art used for the album and single covers.  I approve.

Conquering Planet Earth:

Initially, I assumed that this first big article would just be about the very early days but it goes all the way up through the 1980s.  Before I read the article, I did glance at the photos.  I assumed I had seen most of the Duran pictures before but I swear some of these images were new to me.  I love that!

The beginning part of the article focuses on the formation of the band and the Birmingham scene.  Nick is quoted in the article talking about how the Rum Runner was “more real” in comparison to the London scene due to the Berrow brothers bringing music from the States and with the look of the club with mirror tiles and neon.  That said, I’m not sure that they got the history totally right.  I think the list of people is accurate but I’m not sure things happened in the order that they are listed, specifically around the topic of lead singer.  For example, it sounds like Andy was in the band a long time before Simon and I don’t think that is true.

One aspect of the article that I found interesting was how the videos were described.  First, it implied that the reason to use video was because the band had five good looking guys.  While that is true. they also could send videos to places that were hard to get to like Australia, which the article leaves out.  That said, they  do state that the Girls on Film video might have objectified women but other videos objectified them like the Rio video.  Hmm…

Of course, the band’s success was featured as well.  The author commented that the band members’ private lives were quickly impacted by all of the fans and attention.  Now, artists would be able to post a picture or tweet to appease their fans but then they couldn’t, resulting in fans following the band everywhere, claims the author.  Interesting.  I don’t know if I agree with that idea.  Would a picture or a tweet really satisfy fans then?  I think a lot of fans would have just wanted more and more and more.  What do the rest of you think?  Would that have eased the frenzy?

Overall, I think the article did a nice job summarizing the 1980s.  I appreciate that it included some of the late 80s as too often that part of Duran’s history gets ignored or glossed over.  I also liked that the interpretation on issues like fame made me think.  Lastly, the little touches made it extra special.  For example, the article covered four tracks more deeply to show the range of Duran’s work.  I liked that and the fun little facts written in tiny writing on the side.  The magazine did not waste space!

Now, I cannot wait to have a chance to dive deep into the rest!

-A

Duran Duran History: Violence of Summer

According to my handy dandy chart of Duran Duran history, the song, Violence of Summer, was released on this date in 1990 in the U.S.  Ignoring the fact that this was a heck of a long time ago, I appreciate an anniversary that allows me a chance to really explore and acknowledge one individual song.

So, here are some Violence of Summer facts to begin with:
*21st single
*B-side was a song called Throb
*There are a lot of different versions:

  • 4:20 (Album version)
  • 3:30 (7″ Mix)
  • 3:18 (The Story Mix)
  • 4:56 (Power Mix)
  • 4:01 (Power Cutdown)
  • 4:45 (The Dub Mix)
  • 4:23 (The Rock Mix)
  • 6:02 (Version Maxi)

Wikipedia describes the song in this way:

“Violence of Summer” is a bright, simple rock song, with ringing piano-like chords over a slick bass underpinning. Lyrically, the song plays with familiar Duran themes: of fleeting romance in the face of sexual politics, and mars-meets-venus peculiarities between the genders. Le Bon continues to set these preoccupations into more realist scenarios, challenging himself to leave behind the opaque mysticism of the band’s first three albums.

Also worth noting lyrically, is this tracks return to the U.S.-inspired lyrics of Notorious: “going South where her mother writes”, and “breaking heads in the sugar shack” (which references the cover art of Marvin Gaye’s I Want You.)

It was released 23 July 1990 in the UK, and 11 August in the US.”

I, for one, am fascinated with how the song is described both musically and lyrically.  It is simple?  I can get behind the idea of piano-like chords over a slick bass.  As for the lyrical description, I’m not sure about the idea of “fleeting romance in the face of sexual politics”.  I get the idea of a fleeting romance–I suspect that is why the lyric “summer” was included, to show that it was a short term thing.  Was Simon challenging himself, lyrically?  No idea.

What about the video?  Wikipedia describes it this way:

“The video for “Violence of Summer” was filmed in Paris by the young directing duo Big TV! (more conventionally known as Andy Delaney and Monty Whitebloom). The band, with paler skin and shorter hair than before, plays energetically on a set constructed to look like a bumper-car rig (mirroring the amusement park theme of the album sleeve), while models (including Tess Daly) in platinum blonde wigs hang about outside looking seductive. Newly muscular guitarist Warren Cuccurullo is almost unrecognizable to fans who were accustomed to his formerly waif-like appearance.”

First of all, I find it interesting that the writer focused on Warren’s appearance so much.  I don’t know that I would have ever described Warren as “waif-like.”  Then again, there is a lot here about appearances, in general.  There is only one mention of the band playing live and nothing on the rest of the storyline.  Let’s watch the video.  How would you describe it?

What about chart success?  How did it do?

  • #20 UK Singles Chart
  • #64 Billboard Hot 100
  • #36 Billboard Hot Dance Music/Club Play
  • #13 Billboard Modern Rock Tracks
  • #3 Federation of the Italian Music Industry
  • #29 The Swiss Top 30
  • #59 Australia (ARIA Chart)[1]

Number 20 in the UK really isn’t bad.  64 isn’t great in the US but better than many of the singles that followed.  Isn’t it funny how what is deemed successful is relative.

What do I think of this song?  It is one that I definitely enjoy especially when I am in the mood to sing aloud at the top of my lungs.  Favorite lyrics?  Let’s look at them first.

Hey!, pick it up
This’ll get you out.. of your head
China’s heading up, by the ratings on a motion
She goes with a real head biker, he’s a metalhead
She looks me up and down talkin’ dirty eyes
Sweet sayin’ boy, baby I can lick you any time.
(keep it up)
(Ha ha, that’s right)
Here we go again…
Bit later…
I’m gonna run into ’em round the back
While all them guys break heads in the sugar shack
Don’t give me drink, I don’t wanna get too stoned
Then we’re gonna see who’s gonna take who home
The violence of summer, and love’s taking over
It starts with desire, ends up under cover
Those lips will make me right..
You may look down but don’t think twice (ooh-oh)
So death is on the way,
So what man? I still want to play….
(oh-oh Yeah..)
One, two!
This’ll get you out, of your money
This’ll pick you up, let’s go!
We’ll take a ride, going south where her mother writes
For bad news catches up, we still got a little time
We made it all so far away,
One thing is sure, we shouldn’t stay
I’ll take it all – China gonna get the run around,
A run, a run around..
The violence of summer, and love’s taking over
It starts with desire, ends up under cover
China, na China, na, na, na
China, na China, na, na, na
China, na China, na, na, na
China, na China, na, na
The violence of summer, and love’s taking over
It starts with desire, ends up under cover
Mmmmmm
Loves taking over..
Yes loves taking over..
Loves taking over..
I’m not going to lie.  My favorite line, “Don’t give me drink, I don’t wanna get too stoned.”  What about the rest of you?  What do you think of the song?  Video?  Lyrics?
-A

Mountain Winery, 2012 – were you there?

What were you doing on this date in 2012? Anything good? I do believe that some DD fans out there were lucky enough to be at the Mountain Winery in Saratoga, California! This was the first of two nights at the winery, and in fact they were the first US dates included in the final leg of shows on the All You Need is Now tour.

Let’s just take a quick look at the set list, shall we?

  1. Before the Rain
  2. Planet Earth
  3. A View to a Kill
  4. All You Need is Now
  5. Being Followed
  6. The Reflex
  7. Come Undone
  8. Is There Something I Should Know
  9. Girl Panic!
  10. The Man Who Stole a Leopard
  11. Notorious
  12. White Lines
  13. Ordinary World
  14. Hungry Like the Wolf
  15. Sunrise
  16. Wild Boys/Relax

Encore:

  1. Save a Prayer
  2. Rio

 

I hadn’t looked at this set list in quite a while. I must admit that I miss “All You Need is Now”, opening with “Before the Rain” (but not that 9-minute artsy film they played before they took the stage!), and even seeing the audience clap along with “The Man Who Stole a Leopard”.  Good times.

All of this talk about setlist makes me wonder what, when and where we’ll hear of Duranlive next!

-R

Duran Duran History: Opening for Blondie

If you look at Duran’s tour history, you might see that during this time in early August in 1982, they were opening up for Blondie.  In fact, during the tour, they played such places as Rockford, Illinois, and Cedar Rapids, Iowa.  That makes me laugh.  Neither one of those places are super exciting.  I suspect that they might have been the only times they played in these very small cities.  This makes me think, though.  What did Duran Duran think of those places?  Did this tour help Duran win any fans?  What about the bands and artists who have opened for Duran?  Have they earned any new fans that way?

So, in thinking about these shows in Rockford and Cedar Rapids, I have to laugh.  I’m pretty familiar with both places after having grown up in Illinois and visiting Iowa a number of times when my siblings attended college or graduate school there.  I don’t think it would be wrong of me to say that they are not super hip.  Rockford has less than 150,000 people and Cedar Rapids has about 130,000.  They are not know to be musical meccas now and probably not even in 1982.  Yet, Blondie decided to go to these places.  Okay.  Interesting choices considering that Chicago isn’t that far away, neither is Milwaukee or even Des Moines.  Both of these cities are surrounded by farmland and a heck of a lot of corn.  I seriously wish that I was a fly on the wall in Duran’s tour bus at the time.  What did they think?  This makes me wonder about other weird places Duran has played over the years.  What is the weirdest place you know that Duran played?  I would like to know what could possibly beat or equal these Midwestern “cities”.

More importantly, I suppose, then the locations is whether or not this tour really did any good for Duran, in terms of winning over fans.  Now, I know that a lot of books and documentaries have covered the rise of the band and how they became successful.  Many times, this tour is mentioned but did it really do its job for them?  I think many Duran historians and music historians, for that matter, believe that the introduction of MTV and the use of video did a lot to get Duran fans.  Some might claim that opening for Hazel O’Connor was super important as that is where record labels first heard and saw them.  It is where they got signed to EMI.  Still, others might mention meeting the Berrow brothers at the Rum Runner as being super important to Duran’s future success but the Blondie tour?  I’m not sure.  Of course, I doubt there are statistics out there that can directly measure the number of fans before and after opening for Blondie.  I also recognize that there aren’t direct lines between events.  The Blondie tour might have opened up some doors which led to even more doors, which eventually brought commercial success.  What do you all think?  Did this tour matter to the band’s success?

Then, I flip it around to ponder whether or not Duran helped other bands reach success by having them as an opener.  In 2005, if anyone would have asked me, I would have said that the band’s opener then, Clear Static, would definitely find success.  Years later, obviously, that isn’t true.  Of course, they have also had bands who are already successful themselves like  Chic.  This makes me think of the fans.  While I think it is cool to see a new band with a lot of potential play, I love seeing a fabulous opener that is already known to me like Chic.  What about the rest of you?  Who have you seen as an opener who you thought would really make it?  Who did make it?  Who have been some great openers for shows you have attended?

-A

Happy 37th Anniversary MTV!

Can you believe that MTV launched on this date in 1981—a mere 37 years ago???

I kept going back and redoing the math on that, because it just doesn’t seem possible. I can’t remember exactly when MTV arrived at my house. I know we had cable at some point, and I remember watching MTV for hours and hours. I just don’t know when we finally got it, although I’m sure it was before Live Aid in 1985.  What I do remember is that my friend Marsha had it as soon as it became available to residents in Covina, California.  I began spending many hours of my day planted in front of her TV as a result. (Thanks Mrs. W!!)

My musical tastes were formed by two things: playing clarinet, and MTV.  As a clarinet student, I learned far more about classical music than I ever thought possible. In the years before MTV, I knew more about classical composers than I did contemporary 1980’s-era artists on the radio. By then, I’d cultivated a deep appreciation for  Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, and Mozart, along with many others. That list is long, my friends. Benny Goodman was and still is my hero and spirit animal, right alongside Pete Fountain and Artie Shaw.  On the other hand, I really didn’t know much about pop music. I discovered a local radio station – KROQ – before MTV came along, but once the videos got started, there was no stopping me. I relished every single video that came on the screen, along with juicy bits of music news and background information that VJ’s such as Martha Quinn and JJ Jackson diligently doled out in between.

I cut my New Wave and Alternative teeth on artists like Wall of Voodoo, Burning Sensations, The Motels, The Fixx, Visage, Soft Cell, Joy Division—I could go on and on and on, and you’d likely know every band and artist.

It blows my mind that this all began 37 years ago. Can it really be possible? Sadly, I know it is. Life goes by in the blink of an eye.

I wouldn’t mind sitting down in front of the TV to watch an MTV video marathon direct from 1981, even if only for a day. It is a shame we can’t step back in time, for even just one moment. The innocence of youth, hope for what the future might hold, and seemingly limitless energy all seem very appealing right now.

Yep, I’d take a little more of all that today.

-R

In the Rear View Mirror – Irvine Meadows 2016

On this date in 2016, Duran Duran played the Irvine Meadows Amphitheater in Irvine, California.

Incidentally for me, this was right by my current home. Not more than a fifteen minute drive at most. The amphitheater was a mainstay in Orange County, being one of the sole places to catch an outdoor gig with bigger names than might play one of the (many) community outdoor concerts in the area. To the band, Irvine and the surrounding area probably just looked like Land of the Planned Community. Cookie-cutter homes, all with Spanish tiled roofing and manicured lawns. Mundane. Boring yes, but still home to those of us who live here.

Just so you know, I can’t wait to get out of here and have a home in the hills, somewhere far north of the traffic and crowds, but that’s another story for another day.

It was only two years ago, but the snapshot in my head from that night is of my youngest, sitting a few rows away with my husband. At the time she was eight years old, and was so excited to go see Duran Duran that night!  Her favorite song at the time was “Last Night in the City”, a fact that both amused me and made me apprehensive for the teenage years yet to come. She loved singing it at the top of her lungs in the car when we’d drive to and from school, cultivating her inner-diva as she would regularly hit Kiesza’s high notes, much to my surprise. Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending upon your view), she has entered more of an “emo” phase now. Preferring dark clothes, absolutely no dresses of any kind, and anime over Duran Duran videos. It’s an adjustment, and it’s a journey.  deep cleansing breath

I remember sitting with Amanda before the show.  I think we might have been among the first to arrive in our section that night. In fact, the cover photo for this website is from that show, taken by my husband. We were excited, as we always are, but it felt a little bittersweet, too. This was our second to the last show for that summer. It felt like we’d been in “tour-mode” for weeks, and I think we could feel the let-down coming on. That’s always painful, but it was made a little less-so that night by someone peering at us from side stage and giving us a wave before the show started that night. Apparently, we’d gone to enough shows that summer to be recognized, which is kind of funny. Hey, at least he didn’t send security out to remove us!

It was a fun summer. I loved the road tripping that Amanda and I did together. I have never laughed harder than when we were filming a few of the YouTube videos we posted.  These days, when my life is in a bit of a disarray and Amanda is very busy with her own missions in life, 2016 feels like a long time ago.

I know that for a lot of fans, the Astronaut tour holds special meaning. It is when many met one another, and traveled to different corners of the world to see the band, and one another. For me, the Paper Gods tour is similar. I saw more shows this tour than any other, went to new places, and made many new friends. I couldn’t have asked for more than that. Since 2016, Irvine Meadows Amphitheater has been torn down and replaced by condominiums. There’s a new amphitheater called Five Points that has opened up in the Irvine Great Park. I hear it’s nice, but I can’t help but wish they’d left Irvine Meadows alone. Nothing ever stays the same forever though, does it?

A tour is just a snapshot. Just as we can look back at Duran Duran photos and place them in a timeline based on outfits and hair color, we can do the same with a tour.  I wonder how any of us would characterize the Paper Gods tour now that it’s in our rear view mirror?  Maybe that’s another blog for another day.

-R

 

“Hold Back the Rain” for Astronauts in 2001!

Most Duranies seem to recognize a space theme within Duran Duran. Songs like “Planet Earth”, albums like “Astronaut”, and the alien manning synthesizers back on the risers, all support the idea. But did you know that Duran Duran even helped NASA once?

During the summer of 2001, the Space Shuttle Atlantis was due to land at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida after a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. At the time, they were still assembling the space station, and so there were many of these missions taking place. In fact, there were 3 spacewalks on this particular mission.

The shuttle was due back on July 24, but Mission Control was concerned about the landing due to poor weather. Yet, they really needed to get the shuttle back on the ground.  So, who and what did they turn to in their time of need??

Duran Duran and “Hold Back the Rain”, of course! They played this song for the shuttle crew, motivating them for a safe landing in bad weather. The shuttle made it back on the ground without a hitch, and this mission became another part of history, so they say.

Unfortunately I can’t seem to find a NASA clip of it being played for the astronauts on YouTube, but I do have the 2017 performance from the Fox Theater in Oakland. I was in the audience that night, and nearly lost my mind. It was a thrill to have it included in their set that night.

The power of Duran Duran. Even NASA gets it!

-R

 

Sets You on a Path: Duran Duran Turning Points

Summer means sleeping late, catching up with friends, watching baseball and more.  While I consider my time off to be compensation for all the overtime I work during the school year, I don’t completely turn my teacher brain off.  What does that mean?  Sometimes, it means taking classes or joining a summer teacher book group.  This year, the teacher in me is tackling the book, Lincoln, by Doris Kearns Goodwin.  This dense masterpiece is a bit of a monster at over 700 pages.  As I read it, I ponder Lincoln’s smart political moves, including his understanding of the times and inherently knowing when to push for progress.  Yet, I cannot help but think about what historians call “turning points.”  These are moments in history that shift the trajectory of a person, group, country or world.  Lincoln’s election would be one, for example, as it led to states like South Carolina to secede from the Union.  Of course, in thinking about turning points, my brain immediately turns to my own personal turning points and the fan in me wonders the same about Duran.

Typically, turning points, for historians, are ones that change things.  They are not moments that show the results of significant change or work.  In thinking about this, what were the turning points for Duran Duran?  What were the turning points in my own fandom?

In thinking about Duran’s history, the first moment that pops in my head is when Nick and John walked into the Rum Runner for the first time.  There, they met the Berrow brothers who would not only become their managers but also provide them a place to practice and play.  What if the band members did not meet these guys in the beginning of their careers?  What if they didn’t manage them?  Then, I think about having Simon come to audition.  That moment was clearly a significant turning point for Simon.  His life changed dramatically based on that one action.  What if the barmaid in the Rum Runner never suggested Simon?  What if he never came?  Would Duran be as successful as they have been?  What about having producers like Colin Thurston?  What if he didn’t produce the first album?  Would it have turned out as fabulous as it did?

I don’t really have an answer to any of those questions.  The easy answer would be to say that they were all essential moments for the band.  Did the band members know that they were turning points, that they were so super significant?  I don’t know.  Obviously, I think about John’s autobiography when he talks about Simon’s arrival.  He called his lyrics “poetry”.  Maybe, John had a sense.  Did Simon know?  I don’t know.  I remember hearing an interview in which Simon claimed that he would just going to sing in the band as a hobby but that John convinced him otherwise.

Then, I think of my own fandom.  What were my turning points?  I know that I have talked about falling for the band in the first place over the song, The Reflex.  That song certainly changed my life.  Then, of course, I might pick the moment I heard about the reunion or checked out message boards for the first time, bringing me back into the fan community.  For sure, Rhonda and I might list the 2004 Duran Duran Fans Convention in New Orleans as a turning point.  What if Rhonda and I hadn’t met each other?  So much would be different.  We wouldn’t (probably) be blogging everyday.  The Daily Duranie would most likely not exist or not exist in this format.  Did we know it then?  Did we know that the convention was a big deal in our lives?  I cannot speak for Rhonda but I had no clue.  When I returned home, I had more friends, memories of a  seriously fun time and my love for Duran had been reinforced.  That is all that I knew.

Would I recognize another turning point?  Would the band?  I don’t know.  Maybe.  Some events, I think, are so big that you might know.  For example, if I walked outside my house right now and got hit by a bus, that might be an obvious turning point.  Then, it makes me think.  Is it important to recognize them when we can?  As a historian, I know that it is essential to understand the story of the past but I am not sure that it does it matter in our personal lives.  Maybe, it does.  After all, just like in history, recognizing turning points provides clarity that can not be gathered else wise.  Perhaps, it is the same for people, personally, and for fandom, generally.

-A