Category Archives: touring

Highlights and More from Night One of Spring 2017 Tour!

I apologize for the lateness of the blog today (as well as the lack of a question of the day).  Wi-fi has not been super cooperative for us as we have been out by the pool most of the day, enjoying drinks and Duran trivia (let the record show that our friend, Lori, and I beat Rhonda and our friend, Suzie!!).

Today’s blog is a little vlog that captures the good, the bad and the ugly of last night’s show.  Just kidding…it is more about the highlights, lowlights and hopes for tonight’s show.

Without further ado, here are our thoughts about last night’s show, the first Duran show of their Spring 2017 Paper Gods Tour.  This show took place at the Agua Caliente casino and resort and definitely features some excitement (a new song!!) and some disappointment (have I mentioned that Planet Earth is my favorite Duran song of ALL TIME?!? and it wasn’t played!!!).

-A

…And We’ll Remember

Twelve years ago today I drove to Chicago to join my new Duranie friends for a weekend of fun and Duran Duran.  While I had met many of these new friends months prior in New Orleans, the weekend in 2005 was the first time I would attending a Duran show with any of them.  When those Astronaut tour dates were posted, we made plans quickly, including deciding to gather in Chicago to not only see the show, but to buy those more expensive VIP tickets.  I purchased those tickets for myself, Rhonda and another friend of ours.  In reality, I had no real idea if I could trust them to pay me back, but they did.  I had no clue if I could really hang out with them for an entire weekend or whether or not Rhonda and I would share a hotel room without a problem.  I took a leap of faith.

By 5 am on March 20th, 2005, I knew that it Rhonda and I were able to not only go to shows together but could travel “on tour” well together.  During that weekend, I laughed more than I had for an entire year, I swear.  I had so much fun that I wondered if it shouldn’t be illegal.  I almost questioned my grip on reality because it exceeded every expectation I had.  The joy I felt was pure and fulfilled me in a way that I wasn’t even aware that I lacked.  To say that the weekend changed my life would be an understatement.  Everything changed after that.

When I look back at the 12 years that have transpired between then and now, I almost cannot believe it and I certainly wouldn’t have believed it then.  Rhonda and I have shared so much.  We have traveled to the UK twice together.  We have seen shows ranging from Glasgow, Scotland, to Toronto, Canada, to New York City, New York to Biloxi, Mississippi, to Chicago, Illinois, to San Diego, California and more.  Beyond those shows, we started this blog here.  The Daily Duranie became way more than just a simple, little blog about Duran Duran.  It became about fandom and about us and about our fan community.  The blog has become a part of us and who are are, both as individuals and as a pair.  I think ending the blog would feel like cutting off an arm or at least a finger.  I would miss it.

Beyond the shows and the blogging, we also organized many fan meet-ups and a weekend long convention.  We have written two full manuscripts and have come up with many more ideas.  The love that we had and have for a band blossomed, bloomed into real action on our parts.  We have criticized widely for our approach, our questioning, our criticism.  We have also been praised by our dedication (or insanity).  We have been accused of being too negative by some and thanked for keeping the fandom going.

Rhonda and I met in New Orleans in September of 2004.  While that weekend included some amazingly fun activities as well as an acknowledgement that we were kindred spirits when it comes to Duran Duran, it didn’t create the domino affect like that the weekend in Chicago in March of 2005 did.  A convention is a one weekend off event.  It is not something that can be easily replicated.  Shows, though?  They happen more often.  Tours provide us the opportunity to relive that first weekend over and over, at least to some extent.  That first touring weekend started a snowball of fandom that has grown even as it has changed.  It solidified the beginnings of a friendship that has meant the world to me.

Now, on the anniversary of that date, I wonder what will come next.  Will the snowball of fandom continue to get bigger?  Will it stay the same in size while totally changing shape?  What about Rhonda and myself?  In many ways, our friendship has been tested a lot.  We have faced rejection, been ignored, the receivers of some insulting and hateful comments over the years.  Beyond that, we recognize that our “real” lives are often pulling us in opposite directions while we continue to work together and to be friends.  I don’t know exactly how we will navigate the next twelve years, I just know that I hope we can continue to do it together.  After all, we aren’t done with Duran Duran yet.

-A

Presales and the die hard fan: Is the process really meant to be fair?

A couple weeks ago, Amanda blogged about the new presale system that Depeche Mode is using for their upcoming tour. In full disclosure, I am not a huge Depeche Mode fan in 2017. I owned all of their albums up until the late 90s or so, but I got bored. I’m not here to get into a debate over their music, so we’ll just say that I always take notice when they come out with something new, but I’m not quite as driven as many others.  So, when their new tour was announced, along with a vague explanation of this new presale system where your place in line is at least partially determined by how hard you work to promote Depeche Mode and their tour, I knew there was no way I was getting involved.  I just don’t love them that much. I’m not sure I love any band that much, outside of Duran Duran.

Oddly, considering the tone of this post, I have always been a big supporter of fan marketing. That means that an artist shares the responsibility of marketing with  his/her/their fan base, and then rewards them for their efforts. Depeche Mode isn’t necessarily wrong to use a similar method for this tour. I think the idea of rewarding fans who go the extra mile is a great idea…and that has nothing to do with the fact that I’ve written a blog for the past six years. It just makes good sense. But how to make it all work? The devil is in the details. Or, in other words, something that sounds good on paper doesn’t always work out in real life. Or online.

For the past two weeks or so, I’ve seen a lot of my friends post or tweet something about registering for Depeche Mode tickets using their link so that they can move up farther in line.  I saw the same posts from the same people tens, if not hundreds of times. I don’t know if just posting helped them, or if they really needed people registering off of their link for it to count. I also saw, with some regularity, posts from other friends who were complaining about how far they’d dropped in line. Very few of them seemed to move up, and staying in the lower digits at least seemed pretty difficult to me from the outside looking in. I don’t know how much effort it took to remain in those spaces (and if anyone has insight on that, feel free to drop me a line or share your tale in the comments!), but I do know that if I’d been involved, I would have obsessed over my number in line, which is never good (for me, anyway).

The frenzy of posts seemed to grow until this weekend, where it seemed CRAZY, until last night when the same friends got their emails telling them their presale times for this morning. I woke up this morning to many negative-leaning posts about the presale process.

It was about this time when I started being thankful for paying my $35.00 a year membership to DDM, and only having to work within the DD presale process. Yes, Ticketmaster has not always been kind to me, but to be fair—the main reason I have had any kind of trouble has been because I didn’t want to pay for top tier Duran Duran tickets,  so I have gone with a lesser VIP package, and then been appalled where those packages have ended up being, seat-wise. I don’t know what that’s about with me, but I’ve just learned that if I’m going to go, I have to suck it up and pay the big prices to be up front, or just be satisfied I’m in the building. There’s no in between for me, I really am that high maintenance, and that is MY problem. But back to Depeche Mode…

As I observed friends getting more and more impatient over the Depeche Mode presale, I realized that there just isn’t any one way to make this process fair for everyone. There’s always going to be someone who feels screwed, no matter what is done.

Let’s face it, a successful tour means sold-out shows, and if there are sold-out shows, it means that sure enough, somebody, somewhere, will end up without the tickets they want. Demand exceeded supply. Hence the sad posts from fans without tickets, angry posts from those who ended up with back row, and frustrated posts from those who think $300 for one mediocre seat in the rear of the venue is a little out of hand. And trust me, it is, I agree…but we pay it because we desperately want to be there. The venue, management and a host of other people who make their living from concerts all know this. It is the name of the game. Business. 

I saw a lot of disappointed posts this morning, and a lot of people saying they bought some tickets but weren’t at all happy about what it took to get them. I thought a lot about the things I’m willing to do to go to a DD show these days. For me personally, I’m not sure where the line is drawn. Some days, like today, I’m thinking that I do enough as it is. I just want to buy the damn ticket. I would be really upset if they went to a similar system as Depeche Mode, and I’m not sure I’d bother.  On other days, I might say that if I had to participate with all of that posting and tweeting in order to do a presale and get a decent spot – I suppose I might. I’m not sure. Right now, I’m feeling tired. I don’t feel young, and I’m just not sure it’s all worth it, but that could easily change overnight. I don’t want to begin jumping through more hoops in order to see Duran Duran, but when push comes to shove would I really be willing to stop seeing them live, or would I be willing to forgo a good spot in line for presales?  Would you?

I hope I don’t have to find out any time soon.

-R

 

Looking at the Reasons for Me to Head Back

If Duran Duran had a philosophy of life, I would say that it was to live in the moment.  All you need is now, right?  In interviews, they often claim not to look back at earlier times.  They are happy where they are, doing what they are doing at that moment.  During the All You Need Is Now era, I loved the idea of embracing the moment that I found myself in.  I felt like this would help me appreciate the good in life and be happier.  In theory, I believed I should follow this idea all of the time.

Now, in 2017, I cannot help to reject that way of life as much as I don’t want to.  Unfortunately, I can’t embrace the now.  I am unable, as things are tough and I’m not enjoying myself very much.  Thus, I’m longing for the past, for the fun I experienced.

Two weeks from today, I’ll be in California.  I’ll be with Rhonda and we will be anxiously awaiting the show in Rancho Mirage.  The shows there will take place on an anniversary.  Twelve years ago on March 17th, I began my very first Duran “tour”.  I had seen the band before but that weekend marked the first time I traveled to see the band and the first time I saw more than one show in a weekend with other Duranies.  A big part of me wishes that I could go back to March 17, 2005.  To say that I had fun that weekend would be an understatement.  It was so much fun that I keep going on tour in hopes to have a similar experience all over again!

Yet, I cannot go back.  There is no time machine and I have no superpowers.  It is 2017.  I cannot change that.  Yet, in two weeks, I will experience another tour, another chance to have serious fun.  When I think back to that 2005 tour, I think about all of the little traditions that began then.  We consumed a few adult beverages, got very little sleep, and couldn’t find the time to eat meals.  Memories, experiences and quotes were captured on paper after I took a take home menu from a restaurant.  If those little traditions weren’t enough, more were added with many tours after that.

In thinking about this upcoming tour, I could forget about the past and just live right now in 2017.  I could also decide to re-embrace those traditions.  I’m aware that my touring days are not going to last much longer.  In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if these shows aren’t some of my last.  Heck, they could be my last because you just never know.  I could go into these shows thinking about how sad it is that touring can’t last forever or that there might be other factors ending my “touring” life.  I don’t want that.  This little tour needs to be appreciated and loved, especially if it is one of the last tours ever for me.

My plan, then, is simple.  As I move closer to these shows, I’ll remind myself of all our little traditions to make sure that I follow them.  If these shows are some of my last, then, I’ll go out with a bang, even if it means looking back.

-A

Another Way to Presale

Believe it or not, I try to pay attention to a few other bands/artists out there besides Duran Duran.  While nothing compares to my love and dedication to Duran, I am a fan of other bands.  I just don’t spend anywhere near the same amount of time and money on them.  My fan status is much more casual fan as opposed to the intense fandom of Duran.  One of those other bands that I’m a fan of is Depeche Mode.  It has always ranked within my top five bands.  I own every album of theirs and do try to see them live when I can.  Right now, Depeche is preparing for a flurry of activity.

Depeche’s latest album, Spirit, is due out on March 17th but they have already released a single.  “Where’s the Revolution?” came out this winter and is definitely getting fans’ attention.  If that was not enough, the band has a tour planned for this summer in Europe and more dates coming up in the U.S.

Now, we all know how Duran typically does their pre-sales.  A show is announced on the band’s social media and official website.  That announcement includes information about how much the tickets are, what kind of VIP packages are available and a date and time for the upcoming pre-sale.  Usually, that pre-sale takes place within a couple of days.  At the time of the sale, fans usually have a code that they use to buy tickets.  From there, it is a first come, first serve system.  All fans who are part of the fan club have an equal chance of getting whatever tickets the fan club had, theoretically.

Over the history of this blog, the topic of pre-sales has come up often.  Fans, including ourselves, have, at times, complained and within reason.  Some of us didn’t and don’t like the use of Ticketmaster.  What is or is not included in VIP packages has often been discussed along with the value of the concert tickets, in general.  Many have expressed frustration over what tickets are even available to fans through these pre-sales.  I could go on but you get the drift.  To summarize, many Duranies are not certain about how Duran chooses to run their pre-sales.  Thus, I’m always looking for how other bands do it to see if there really is an alternative.

This week, I learned about how Depeche Mode is going to run their pre-sales.  According to the article on diffuser.fm, this is their plan:

In order to head off scalpers at the pass, they’ve opened what they’re referring to as a “digital waiting room” where fans can get first dibs on tickets.

“Depeche Mode are coming back to North America,” the band writes. “And this time, they’re doing something different. Before scalpers and bots, true fans would line up at the box office for days to get tickets. This is the same thing, but online. Claim your spot in line by signing up below, and the higher your spot, the better your access to tickets during the fan pre-sale. End up at the very front of the line for your city and you’ll be invited to meet the band before the show.”

When I learned about this, I followed the directions to sign up.  Interestingly enough, the site asked me to confirm the location of the show I would go to.  Their website goes on to say:  “When we announce the tour dates, we’ll send you your exact spot in line for the city closest to your preferred location. Your spot will determine when you will get access to the fan ticket presale, but it isn’t final until signups end. By purchasing the new album, sharing on social media and generating sign-ups through your link, you can improve your spot.”  Clearly then, you can move up in line based on what you do to help promote the new album and tour.  Fascinating.

Apparently then, I will receive a code, which will give me access to the fan presale but the time that the code will become valid will be decided by my virtual place in line.   From what I read, the line stops changing 48 hours before the pre-sale starts.

I find this system really interesting.  It seems to me that they are hoping that by using this method, they will get more people to buy the new album and promote the album and tour.  As someone who writes a blog each and every day about a band, I love the idea of that work being recognized and rewarded with better concert tickets.  I wonder, though, if this system would even recognize something like a fan blog.  Will the system only acknowledge certain fan actions and behaviors that can be easily “read” and calculated by technology?

Another element of this pre-sale system that I question is the idea of having to give a location.  For me, this works for Depeche Mode.  I won’t travel to see them.  Thus, if I go to a Depeche concert, it is likely to be in Chicago or Minneapolis.  If this was for Duran Duran, though, I would travel, if dates work out better, but the chosen location has to be determined immediately to get in line.  Also, what happens if fans want to go to more than one show? Do they rely on other friends put other locations down?  Does this just end up encouraging going to only one show?

All in all, I find some of this idea fascinating and potentially positive for fans.  On the other hand, it limits fans to one city without knowing any of the dates.  It will be interesting to see how this works in real time.  What do the rest of you think?

-A

The Wedding Album was released on this date in 1993!

My first thought as I sat down to write this blog was that I graduated from college in 1993.  Today, that feels like a million years ago. I don’t know quite what it is about those mid-90s for me, but the years and memories all blend together. Not quite a black hole, but not quite distinct vivid memories, either.  Unfortunately for me, that includes The Wedding Album.

Sure, I remember hearing “Ordinary World” on the radio.  Who wouldn’t?  It was the first time in many years that Duran Duran seemed to be on heavy rotation. I also remember blasting “Too Much Information” in my car as I would drive home from school.  So, I know I must have bought the CD at some point.  I can remember wondering why on earth they (the band) went with the album being self-titled again, because it seemed so confusing. As it was, I always called their first album, well…their first album, as opposed to Duran Duran by Duran Duran. Why not just give it a name?  Turns out, we did it for them anyway. Everyone I know calls it The Wedding Album. I even capitalize and italicize it as though that’s the way it’s meant to be!

Where was I?  Oh yes, very few memories of this album when it came out. It is true. I suppose in some way, my experience is indicative of where I was in my life at the time. I was months away from graduating from college. I was trying to find a job, dating my boyfriend (who eventually became my husband), commuting a ridiculous distance back and forth to school each day, and I guess I really wasn’t paying as much attention to Duran Duran as I once did…or would again in the future.

I can tell you a few things about my own feelings about that album from day one, though.  To begin with, I really liked “Ordinary World”. My husband even learned the guitar part well after we were married and moved back to California because he knew how much I loved it. However, my favorite song on the album, both then and now, is “Too Much Information”.  I also liked “Come Undone”…and for me, those were really the only songs that hit me off the album.  I played it all the time in my car, but I found myself hitting repeat on those songs and skipping much of the rest.  All I can say is that we all have our favorites.  I’m glad the album propelled Duran Duran onward, because they’re still with us today as result.

From what I’ve read over the years, I wasn’t the only fan that was consumed by real life during this period. I wish I had more memories. One thing I do remember – very vaguely – is going to see Duran Duran play at Irvine Meadows later that year. I went in August, and I sat…wait for it…on the LAWN.  My friend had bought tickets for the two of us to go see Duran Duran together as a graduation gift.  I was excited to see the band – I think it was only the second time I ever saw them, actually.  I knew we’d be way back from the stage but it didn’t matter much to me, at first. However, even back then going to shows wasn’t without some sort of drama.  My boyfriend was more than a little annoyed that he wasn’t invited, and so he went and got his own tickets – much closer to the front – and went with one of his friends. This, my friends, was the one and only time that Walt has ever had a better seat at a Duran show than I’ve had, and HE WILL NEVER LET ME FORGET IT.  Good times!

That’s probably why I barely remember the show or much from this era – I blocked it from memory.  😀

-R

 

The Big Egg in 1989 – do you remember?

Oddly enough, I barely remember 1989.  I can tell you that on this date in 1989, I was living in the dorms at Cal State Fullerton, and I’m pretty sure that I knew my (then) boyfriend and I were going to go see Duran Duran at the Universal Amphitheater in March. Aside from those two things, I can’t tell you much about what was going on in the world back then.

HOWEVER…I do remember this show for a couple of reasons. First of all, they played at a venue named The Big Egg.  Come on now.  Who forgets a name like that?? Secondly, I have seen video from this show. The wardrobe choices alone are burned into my memory for all eternity. Yes, I’m poking fun…because I can, and because none of them are standing in front of me. <insert big wide grin here> Listen, the 80’s happened to ALL of us. I just thank my lucky stars that me and my frizzy, peroxide-bleached hair from back then is nowhere to be found online.

So, while I wasn’t at the show (how many of us really traveled to Japan back then anyway?)…I still enjoy when this date comes up each year so that I can search for just the right YouTube video to share.

Enjoy Maximum Big Surprise (mash-up medley of Election Day and Some Like it Hot)  The video quality isn’t great but it was the best I could find this year…

 

Happy Wednesday!

-R

 

 

 

It’s about the money, honey! Those darn ticket prices

Lately, the blog has been void of truly controversial topics.  I have stuck to basics, like commemorating days in history and that sort of thing. The writing has been easy, and I’ve enjoyed not having my inbox/comments flooded with inflammatory and argumentative replies. I don’t miss that sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach, nor do I miss being called out by people on Twitter who really know nothing about me.

However, sometimes, no matter how incendiary a topic might be, it is worthy of some discussion. Amanda and I never used to shy away from the tough topics, and I don’t want to start that now just because of my own comfort zone.  Over the past few days, I noticed a friend comment about the ticket prices for Duran shows. I replied, commiserating over the cost.

On this same thread, another Duranie commented that he didn’t feel the band cared how we felt about their prices. First of all, let’s be clear: I am not all that sure that the band even knows what they charge for concert tickets. As Simon has said many times, they don’t really get involved on the business side – after all, that is why they hire management, right? Second, I would agree that they probably don’t care. I think the band comes out on stage, sees that most of the seats are full – if in fact they can even see that well past the first several rows – and they go about their business of playing their set. They aren’t fixated on how much their shows cost, only what they need to do at the time. Third, Simon himself (and I’m sorry to “pick” on Simon, it just so happens he’s the one who I remember making any mention of this subject) has said that when a fan buys a ticket to their show, they are getting a terrific value for their money.  So I think we all know where he stands, and I can’t blame him.

As the thread continued, another Duranie friend chimed in.  She’s seen them quite a bit over the years, and flat-out refuses to spend so much money to see a band that she’s seen so often. She continued by saying that their latest releases have underwhelmed her, and that also plays a part in her decision not to attend shows. I can’t argue with any of that, either. I mean, why pay to see a band that is putting out music you’re not into? Fair enough.

The one question that always seems to come up during these conversations is whether or not the band is really just into it for the money.  Now, before you hit the comment button here – I KNOW WHAT THE BAND HAS SAID. John Taylor has said in more than one Katy Kafe that it is not just about the money for them. I KNOW.  I would simply ask what do any of us think they’d really say in public?? I highly doubt ANY band would openly say they are still working and performing purely for the money. Even if we don’t think they’re ONLY in it for the cash (which for the record I do not), let’s be fair: making money is part of the deal. It’s called business.

Curiously, the answer to that one little question matters to fans. We white knuckle the belief that the band we love really is not about taking us for everything we’ve got and are willing to part with, to see them.  Yet I think most of us know in our heads that money has to enter into it all somewhere.  The question is, where is that line between having a successful career and selling out purely for cash drawn, and why?

Discussion points are continually made that the band isn’t continuing to sell out massively large venues, and that they’re playing Festivals and casinos. No argument there, although I have pointed out in some conversations that this past summer – they definitely came close to selling out at least some of the venues they performed in that while touring with Chic.  I’ll admit, in my own personal opinion, the ticket prices were pretty high (considerably so if you bought VIP, which I did).  While no, they aren’t playing the same size venues this spring [in the US], the ticket prices have not come down that much. I do see other bands besides Duran Duran on occasion, and while I pay the most to see DD (VIP cost having a lot to do with that so to some degree it is my own fault and I own that), I have found that other tickets are still expensive. It’s just not cheap to go to concerts anymore unless you’re willing to sit in the back or on the lawn.

This is not just about priority for fans. The implication that if you really want to see Duran Duran you’ll pay the price and if you’re just a fair-weather fan, you probably won’t and that’s your problem, is distasteful.That belief gives far too much leeway in passing judgment on others. After all, five years ago, I could afford to do whatever show(s) I wanted, and didn’t have to work outside of the home. Now, I can’t, and I work. Things change, and it isn’t just about priorities. There are real fans of the band who have just gotten to the point where they feel as though the ticket prices are too high to see the same basic set list, or to see songs from albums that just have not hit home.

In closing, I’ll throw out one more sub topic to mull over.  In recent weeks, Amanda and I have had conversations about where the band sits in the overall hierarchy of popularity.  The band (DDHQ) markets their success with Paper Gods.  I made the comment to Amanda just this past weekend that if one listened to management, it is easy to believe that things have never been better for the band.  On the other hand, the energy and buzz have certainly changed over the years we’ve written this blog. It is vastly different now, for a variety of reasons. It is difficult to really grasp the true interest level. On one hand, they can sell out the Hollywood Bowl when touring with Chic. On the other hand, they tend to go for the low hanging fruit and play festivals. They have the opportunity to play for huge crowds without the risk of booking massive venues on their own.  They also play a lot of casino shows.  More and more often, I read of long time fans decide to sit out shows and tours, saying that they’ve given enough to the band over the years.  Is it just the people I follow, or is it a growing trend, and why? Is it our age? Our circumstances? The cost? Are we really that worried about whether the band is only in it for the money these days – or is it just reason to complain?

-R

 

 

Do you remember DD playing Jacksonville in 2005?

I find myself struggling to think of something to blog about on this fine Monday morning in February. The sun is out, it will warm up to the mid-70s here at my house in the OC today….and I can’t think of a single thing to write. Even the dates in history are failing me today.

Turns out, DD hasn’t done a lot over the years on the 13th of February. They’ve played a few times, but the shows haven’t been monumental….or at least there’s nothing about them that I can really remember that needs blogging.

So, I’m going to wing it. First of all, the show in Jacksonville was towards the beginning of the Astronaut tour. If you’re like me, maybe you’re saying “Hey, wait a second – didn’t they play Japan?” The answer is, well…yes…they were supposed to, but no…they did not. There were six shows in Japan during the month of January that were cancelled. So the band went straight from their show at the Hammersmith Palais in London on January 13th to playing the show in Puerto Rico on February 8th. Then they did two shows in Ft. Lauderdale on the 10th and 11. (the one on the 10th was billed as a warm-up show), then a show in Tampa, and then the show in Jacksonville. From then on, it was a crazed ten, fairly solid months of touring. If you don’t believe me, you should check out the complete tour list on dd.com.  They did take breaks in their schedule – but only for a matter of weeks each time (for the most part).  Although, if I think back, it did seem like that entire year was all about touring. Every time I turned around new dates seemed to be announced, and friends were always planning their travel around the band.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – 2005 was a good time to be a Duranie. I didn’t even take full advantage of all of the touring, in fact I limited myself to only a couple of shows, while many others I know were gone for weeks, if not months, at a time.

Jacksonville was really only the beginning, but it was what they did on this date in 2005.  Do you remember?

-R

 

I’m Looking Out the Window…

I hate February.  I think I say that every year.  If you went back and looked at blog plots from February from last year or the year before or the year before that, etc., I’m sure there are sentences that are very similar to my first sentence.  My students are going a little stir crazy as it has been months of cold temperatures and little sunshine.  I’m dying for spring break but it is months away.

In thinking about this, I realized that the last few Februarys have also been quiet on the Duran front, too.  The band has not toured during the month of February since 2005.  Yes, they have played a few shows here and there in February but not a real tour.  Before that, they did play a few shows in February in 2001 and 1993 with longer tours only during the years of 1994, 1989, and of course, 1984.

Ah, yes, 1984 is the year of Duran-mania.  We all know about that year, that tour.  After all, we all saw Sing Blue Silver, right?  This scene always pops in my head when I think about Duran touring during the winter:

I bet that drive to Pittsburg (That is where they were headed in that scene, right?!) was a tough one.  (I recently drove right past Pittsburgh in the middle of the night in the worst fog ever so I can relate.)  In watching that scene, I always wondered if they feared that they wouldn’t make that show.  This, of course, makes me consider why they might not schedule many tours during February.

Winter can be harsh.  Traveling is certainly unpredictable during the this season.  I worried about the weather in making plans to see Duran around New Year’s in DC.  What if the weather sucked and flights got canceled?  What if I couldn’t get to O’Hare?  I had the same concerns in 2008 when I went to a few shows in the Northeast during December.  Luckily, the weather cooperated both times.

I guess the band could tour just in warm places during the winter in order to avoid potential weather pitfalls.  Then, they would be assured that they could get to the shows  without a problem.  That said, others might not be able to get to those shows as easily.  Perhaps, they realize that there is a group of Duranies who are willing to travel to see them when they can.  Their audiences are not just made up of local or nearby fans.  Some part of the crowd consists of people who traveled to go.  Therefore, tours during the winter could be problematic.

Really, I have no idea why Duran has not toured in the winter in the last ten plus years.  It could be that weather factor or something else.  As much as I understand the potential reason(s) why, I find myself wishing that there were shows coming up in a week or two.  Maybe, it is just that I’m anxious for the shows in March.  Perhaps, I just want a break from a reality that is beyond exhausting at this point.  Whatever the reason, I’ll try to hang in here until the shows get started.

-A