iPhoria

If you’ve visited Twitter today, you may have noticed that TV Mania is back tweeting again after a decidedly long absence.  Admittedly, I love their tweets. Quirky as they may seem, invariably they get me thinking about media or just society in general, and if you haven’t quite picked up on that theme here in this blog, we’re sort of into trying to understand what makes us all tick.

It’s nice to see something, ANYTHING, happening in the Duran Duran Stratosphere. That’s right, I’ve elevated their world to a stratosphere.  What of it?

However, along with a quizzical tweet or two, TV Mania tweeted a specific photo/comment.

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In 1996 Euphoria. 2014: iPhoria

That statement is so true. I myself have an iPhone…well, at this point it’s really a dinosaur posing as an iPhone…but it still works. Slowly.  In any case, the thought of thousands of arms holding up cell phones at recent concerts I’ve been to came to mind.  Last May, I went to see The Killers, and although I was in about the 4th row on the floor, I had a terrible time trying to see them. Why? Cell phones being held up everywhere. Eventually I found myself kind of ducking down a bit, looking underneath the cell phone being held by the man in front of me just so that I could see Brandon Flowers. You’d think that people would eventually put down the phone so that they could watch the damn show, but no. No…why watch when you can video it for later, right??

Back in the 80s and 90s I only saw Duran Duran live a couple of times, and to be honest, I was always so far back that there was no point to bringing the camera, so I never did. Then around the time of the reunion, my husband decided to try bringing it. When we saw the band at 4th and B in San Diego, he brought a piece of junk disposable camera just to see if he could get it into the venue, much less take photos, but it worked and I was overjoyed. After that,  I was a woman on fire. I tried bringing my camera to every show. I took photos constantly, and felt like each clear photo I took of a band member was a trophy. In 2006, I went to a show at the Sears Center, just outside of Chicago.  My plane had been late getting in, we were rushed to get to the hotel and even more rushed getting to the venue.  In the all of the craziness, I forgot my camera in the car. I was mad, but what could I do? I enjoyed the show. I danced. I sang. I was likely one of the two most enthusiastic fans in that place. (I laugh because that’s what the lady in front of us told Amanda and I at the end of the show.) I experienced that show in a way I hadn’t for a long time – and it remains one of my favorites to this day even though I don’t have a single photo. Amanda and I talked about that show (and still talk about that show) for a long time. We both agreed that at least part of what made it so special wasn’t that the set list was especially creative or that the band was on fire (although they were), it was that we allowed ourselves to fully experience that moment without distraction. My memories are in my head and heart.

I still bring a camera to the show, but I really try to resist the urge to use it…for most songs. There a few regularly occurring songs in their set that Amanda and I have dubbed “photo ops”, but even then – how many pictures of Dom Brown can I really take?

Don’t answer that.  Shhh.

-R

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