Keeping Fandom Alive

How do you keep fandom alive?  How does the band?  I have often wondered these things as I ponder the nature of fandom.  Obviously, fandom begins with single fans who are people who have discovered a band, an artist, a team, a movie, a TV, an actor, etc. and liked it.  Then, fans come together (not necessarily literally) to form a fandom.  It is easy to get fans when the object of the fandom is new, young, and happening.  This was the case for Duran Duran in the early 1980s.  They were new to the scene, fresh and seemed to be busy all the time.  Certainly, when I look back, I’m amazed that they were able to release 3 studio albums between 1981-1984!  Can you just imagine that now?!  Then, it was easy for them to get fans because their music was great, their videos were amazing and they looked good!  Those fans were easy to keep for those years because the band was busy doing new music, new videos, interviews, tours, appearances and more.  Fans couldn’t get away from Duran.  I remember seeing and hearing Duran Duran EVERYWHERE during that time.  Turn on the TV and they were there.  Turn on the radio and they were there.  Go to the store and see tons of magazines featuring Duran.  They were everywhere.  It was easy to keep fandom alive then but now seems more challenging.

Duran Duran has managed to keep fans for decades.  This seems to be a pretty amazing accomplishment to me.  Obviously, this says a lot about the quality of their music and related projects.  Once we were under their spell, it wasn’t easy for us to get away from them.  Yet, I suspect that many of us have walked away from the fandom at one time or another.  Why weren’t they able to keep our attention?  Is it because they no longer made products that we were into?  That’s possible.  Is it because their exposure in the media decreased?  That’s very possible, too.  Is it also due to the fans?  I think that can be true as well.  Is it a combination of all three?  Probably.  So, how can the band help keep us?  How do we keep our personal fandom alive?

The band, certainly, can help by getting as much exposure as possible.  I’m sure that they would love to be on the radio and TV all the time.  I bet they want as many magazines as possible to do stories or features about them.  Unfortunately, they don’t have the exposure like they once did.  They also don’t release products nearly as quickly as they once did (and some might argue that they aren’t as good).  Heck, they have released 3 albums in the last ten years.  That doesn’t help.  Of course, it seems like they are trying to combat some of this by participating in social networking and updating their official site with news about what they are doing.  But, do we have some responsibility with keeping fandom alive, at least within ourselves?  I think we do.

Since I have spent time away from fandom for the last week, I have had thought about how removed I feel from Duran and the Duranie community.  I have missed it.  I feel a little lost.  On the other hand, I also feel like the longer I’m away, the easier it gets.  The easier it would be to walk away.  Of course, I don’t have any intention of doing that.  I would miss the music, the other fans and especially my friends who are involved in the community.  I certainly would miss writing this blog and would hate to not finish a book that I’m already extremely proud of.  This led to me to think that it is my responsibility to pay attention to what is going on.  I should be communicating with other fans.  Yes, those things are fun but they also help me to keep my fandom alive.

-A

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