Tag Archives: Blue to Brown

Important Albums

My friend David has a new episode of his podcast, The D Side, out now. If you haven’t checked it out yet, you should. It’s available at the link or through iTunes, Spotify…and other places I’ve forgotten to mention.

The thing I love about David’s podcasts is that the topics he tends to choose encourages thinking. While Daily Duranie tends to examine social aspects of fandom much of the time, David focuses on music. Episode 6 continues that well-established pattern.

A lonely figure there

This new episode centers around important albums. David makes sure to note that an “important” album is not necessarily the same thing as a “favorite. We all have that one album (or a few) we love to bits, but typically there are several in our arsenal that maybe spoke to us in a different way, introduced us to a new type of music, or otherwise opened our eyes and ears.

While listening to his descriptions of his own favorite and important albums (No spoilers here – go listen!), I thought about my own potential choices.

Not long ago, someone told me that this site is obviously biased towards Duran Duran. I’m glad that’s coming through, given that the name of the blog is Daily Duranie. I would think my loyalties for this blog would be fairly clear with that sort of name. If you’re looking for unbiased commentary on music of all kinds – this isn’t the place to get it, nor was it designed with that purpose in mind.

Hanging dust clearing from the air

It seems to me, based on a few conversations I’ve had over the nearly nine years I’ve blogged, that there’s an assumption that Amanda and I must only listen to Duran Duran – as if that’s the only music we know. It’s appalling, really, especially given that my minor in college was music theory. I am left wondering if the same assumptions would be made if we were male, rather than female. (another topic for another blog!)

Simply put, just because we’ve chosen to write a blog and manage a website dedicated to our favorites doesn’t mean that we don’t also have many other bands, artists and musical genres we love. While we write about Duran Duran fandom, this does not mean we are unknowledgeable about music. The music is what brought us here to begin with. This concept should not be difficult to grasp. I suspect that those who say such things are people who aren’t regular readers. While I could write volumes (and someday will), today is not that day.

It occurred to me that my job isn’t to win over the naysayers. However, I will take the time to share some important albums (for me) that do not have Duran Duran’s name on them. In a future post, I’ll share some of my favorite non-Duran albums as well.

The Firebird Suite – Igor Stravinsky

Igor Stravinsky was a Russian composer, and at the age of 27, The Firebird was his first international success. The reason why this piece of music is so important for me is because it is the music I first conducted. I spent months learning both how to play the clarinet part, and then learning to read the entire band arrangement. Ultimately, it became the piece of music I auditioned with to be drum major of my high school band. (I was a very different sort of kid, we’ll just say that. Most kids choose marches, and I chose one of the most difficult pieces for a high school band to play on a field) I learned so much from just this one ballet. Yes, it’s actually a ballet, not a march. Anyway, it holds a very special place in my heart.

If you’re curious, here’s a video from the YouTube Symphony Orchestra (yes, that was a thing in 2009 and 2011) – it is their finale concert at the Sydney Opera House. The entire suite is much longer than this – most orchestras play just one movement. My marching band in high school obviously didn’t play this arrangement – there’s a audio of The Ohio State University playing the exact arrangement we did (but GALAXIES better than my marching band ever did!) on YouTube here. The YSO is performing Berceuse – the Infernal Dance, my favorite movement of the suite. This video is great because Michael Tilson Thomas is the conductor (one of my heroes), and the visuals taking place behind the orchestra add a fabulous element. Oh and yes, I wish I was in that clarinet section!

Blue to Brown – Blue to Brown

Another important album that is a little (well, a lot) closer to Duran Duran would be Blue to Brown. Yes, this is one of Dom’s projects – a blues album he recorded with his Dad When I bought this album, I knew it was probably going to be a struggle. I can’t say I’m a huge fan of the blues. I can’t even really say I’m a fan at all. except that American rock and roll owes it’s backbone and emotion to the blues, so…. (I’m sorry Dom. I hang my head in shame) Anyway, I listened, and listened, and listened. I learned that the blues has so much more to it than just it’s twelve-bar progression. While I’m still not going to call myself a fan, I have a much bigger appreciation for the blues now.

It is a little tougher to find good quality video of Blue to Brown on Youtube, but I found “Going Down But Not Slow“.

Revolver – The Beatles

This was a tough choice for me…but when I think back to times when I really listened, and took the time to learn and absorb albums – Revolver was one of the first. My friend Marsha was a huge, and I mean enormous Beatles fan. She knew every single thing there was to know about that group. I can remember the day John Lennon was shot in 1980 – we were in sixth grade, which was middle school. News broke around campus at lunch time and if I remember right, Marsha heard from one of her teachers. She came out of class absolutely hysterical, and had me walk her to the office to call her mom and go home. I hadn’t yet discovered Duran Duran, and was fairly incredulous to the idea of leaving campus because a favorite singer had been killed.

The album itself is, in my mind, a masterpiece. I struggled choosing this one because it is also one of my favorite albums, but it has songs on it that just spoke so deeply to me at the tender age of what…ten(?), that I can’t let it go. From “Eleanor Rigby“, which is a song that I identify with to this very day, to “Yellow Submarine”, which is my least favorite, but still important stylistically. This album became that to which all others were judged by, including Duran Duran’s, so it is indeed an important album for me.

Your assignment is…

The “homework” that David had assigned near the end of his podcast was to choose an important album from Duran Duran, as well as an important non-Duran album, both being from adult years as opposed to albums that had maybe struck us as adolescents or children (as a couple of the ones I shared here did). I sent him my answers, that I’ll also post here:

  • Red Carpet Massacre – Duran Duran: I chose this because as most know, it is definitely not a favorite of mine. However, it is incredibly important. The album was released during the most turbulent time of my life, while I was pregnant with my youngest (at the “tender” age of 37, I might add!), and my father was incredibly ill. It is impossible for me to recall the period around this album’s release and promotion cycle without thinking about everything I was going through. Additionally, this album taught me an incredibly important lessons about fandom, music and even the recording industry. It is still not a beloved album, but an important one to me all the same.
  • Clear Static – Clear Static: This choice is simple, and inexplicably complicated all at once. I met this band in Chicago, 2005. They were opening for Duran Duran, and had all of the potential in the world. I became friendly with them, and even ran their MySpace page for a while, helping with their mail and their street team. I learned a lot from these wealthy and entitled group of kids from the northwestern edge of Los Angeles County. Not long after this album was released, the cracks in the group were evident. It takes far more to truly “make it” than simply opening for a well-established band. That is where the work begins, not ends. Unfortunately, that is where this band finished. I never listen to this album – nor do I plan to start now – but it did change my life and my thinking in many ways. I include it as an important, yet cautionary, reminder to myself.

At a later date, I’ll go back and offer my thoughts on my favorite albums, but for now, it’s your turn! What would you consider your favorite and important albums? Send a tweet to @GuyFansofDuran on Twitter!!

-R

Ultimate Box Set: Side/Solo Projects Part 3

This week, we continue on with our polls surrounding side/solo project songs that fans feel should be considered for the Duran Duran Ultimate Box Set.  The goal is to pick 7 songs each week until the readers have gone through all of the various Duran related side and solo projects before having a final vote.  So far, songs have been picked from Power Station, Neurotic Outsiders, Arcadia, The Devils and TV Mania.  This week, we will tackle both Dom Brown and Freebass.

Before I attach the poll, I have to say something about these two projects.  Dom Brown, Duran’s current guitar player, has done work on his own.  In fact, he has released two solo albums, “Touch the Flames” and “Between the Lines”.  If that was not enough, he has a blues band, Blue to Brown, with his father that also resulted in an album.  If you haven’t heard these albums, I highly recommend them and can be purchased on Dom’s official site.   Normally, when I have done these polls, I have put up YouTube playlists to provide the opportunity to hear the songs before voting.  Unfortunately, there are only a handful available.  I will post the ones I found:

I can provide even less about Freebass.  According to the Duran Duran Wikia  page, Freebass was formed in 1997 by Roger Taylor and Marco Silver in Birmingham.  An album was recorded and the band’s only single is “Love Is Like Oxygen“, a cover of a song done by the British band group, Sweet, was released in January of 1998.  At the same time, the band broke up.  Marco Silver continued on and is now using the name, Free Bass Inc.  You can hear “Love Is Like Oxygen” by clicking the link above.  I will include the other songs on the album on the poll, but lack means of providing all of you a chance to hear them.  I apologize.  If someone knows where/how I could share, please let me know.

Before I get to voting, let’s take a look at what side/solo projects remain in consideration so far:

Power Station:

  • Some Like It Hot
  • Get It On/Bang a Gong
  • Communication
  • Murderess
  • Harvest for the World
  • Still in Your Heart
  • She Can Rock It

Neurotic Outsiders:

  • Feelings Are Good

Arcadia:

  • Election Day
  • The Promise
  • Goodbye Is Forever
  • The Flame
  • El Diablo
  • Lady Ic
  • Keep Me in the Dark

Now, it is time to vote on which Dom Brown and/or Freebass songs should be considered for the Ultimate Box Set.  Vote here:

[socialpoll id=”2445914″]

-A

 

Do You Remember Blue to Brown?

I love writing this blog.

No really, some days, I love it. And then there are other days when I REALLY LOVE IT.  Those are the days when I get to gush on and on about something I’ve enjoyed or am particularly fond of.

On this day, it is both, because my trusty desk calendar reminded me that on this day in 2012, Blue To Brown was released for pre-order.

Ok, now I realize that it is likely a good portion of you are sitting there, squinty-eyed, wracking your brains trying to remember what Blue To Brown might be. Others may have probably already rolled their eyes once, perhaps even twice. I know this is an uphill battle, but one I don’t mind taking on.

First of all, yeah – I’m seriously expecting you all to champion a blog post where I am celebrating not even a CD release, but a pre-order.  I’m getting a bit ahead of myself though, so let’s start at the beginning.

Blue To Brown is the album recorded by Dom and his father. It is a blues album (I think it might be the only one I own, not counting the vinyl collection that Walt has amassed!), and it is very, very different from Duran Duran. When it was announced that Dom would be taking pre-orders for this album, the deal was sweetened a bit by saying for the first 100 orders, Rob and Dom would sign the CD inserts.

I was in!

I mean, I was “in” as soon as they announced I could order an album, but having one signed by both Dom and his dad definitely didn’t hurt. While I knew I’d probably be able to ask Dom to sign something eventually, I wasn’t sure if I’d ever see his dad. (and I haven’t, actually!)  So I ordered away. Did you know that our lovely Anna Ross performs on the album?  She does fantastic work for Blue To Brown.  

It is true, I adore Dom. Any time I can interject his name here in a positive manner, I’m happy to do so. He’s a good guy, a hard worker, and he was the first person I’ve ever interviewed….EVER…for this blog or otherwise, so yep, I’m in his corner. Blue To Brown is a solid blues album with some fantastic guitar, so if you don’t have it yet, get it on his website.

It’s hard to believe that I pre-ordered that album five years ago today. Without knowing the date, I would have thought it was just a year or two ago…three at most!

-R

 

 

Happy 11th Anniversary, Dom!

Today is a very special day, and I am thrilled that it fell on one of my blogging days.  On this date, eleven years ago – Dom Brown played his first gig with Duran Duran!

Has it really been that long?!? I don’t know where the time goes, but I’m glad that in this past year I’ve been able to see Dom play four times – not too bad for someone who lives across the Atlantic from him.

Normally, we don’t take time to celebrate anniversaries for each of the band members because we might not know the exact dates that each of them entered the band, but Dom is special because although to many of us he’s a permanent fixture, he was a gift that was discovered along the way. I’m thankful the band found and had the good sense to hire him because I can’t imagine a show or an album without his presence.

I was recently asked who my favorite band member was – the scenario given was that the band was in front of me, who would I go up to speak with first. At first, without thinking – I said Dom.  After admonishing that while Dom is a lovely guy, he’s not really a member  she asked me to choose again. I really couldn’t. It’s not that I wouldn’t want to speak to any of them (are you kidding me?!?) it’s just that I couldn’t decide which one. I love them all, but they’re all part of the group I’ve loved since I was ten! Dom is a little different since I met him some thirty years into my “tenure” as a Duran Duran fan, yet I’ve embraced him from nearly day one (I say nearly because I wasn’t at his first show!). To me, he is as much a part of the group as any of them, whether that’s right or wrong.

There are at least a few fans out there who like to remind me that he’s “just” the hired player (a hired guitarist who has co-written a good many of their songs off of recent albums, I might add), but to me, there’s no “just” about it. Dom stepped in after Andy left, filling some incredibly large shoes. He’s had to take an awful lot of ribbing and complaining from long-time fans about how he plays some songs, and in a lot of ways, he’s in an impossible position. The Andy fans are convinced no one can play better than Andy, and the Warren fans are 100% convinced Warren needs to be back in this band. He’s not Andy, and no, he’s not Warren. Personally, I think being Dom should be more than enough.

 It’s been eleven years. I say it every year to Duran Duran, but it’s time to make sure Dom doesn’t get away and make this guy part of the band. Officially. Give him some credit and reward him for sticking with you through so much and for so long. It’s way past time.

Regardless, I couldn’t let this day go without sending best wishes and plenty of thanks to him. He’s a good guy, a very talented guitar player, and loved by many, including me.

I’m glad you’re a part of this band, Dom and I’d miss it if you weren’t the one on stage playing Hungry Like the Wolf, Save a Prayer, White Lines (and all of the rest) during the gigs.  😀 You’re still the best!

-R