Tag Archives: Duran Duran shows

It’s about the money, honey! Those darn ticket prices

Lately, the blog has been void of truly controversial topics.  I have stuck to basics, like commemorating days in history and that sort of thing. The writing has been easy, and I’ve enjoyed not having my inbox/comments flooded with inflammatory and argumentative replies. I don’t miss that sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach, nor do I miss being called out by people on Twitter who really know nothing about me.

However, sometimes, no matter how incendiary a topic might be, it is worthy of some discussion. Amanda and I never used to shy away from the tough topics, and I don’t want to start that now just because of my own comfort zone.  Over the past few days, I noticed a friend comment about the ticket prices for Duran shows. I replied, commiserating over the cost.

On this same thread, another Duranie commented that he didn’t feel the band cared how we felt about their prices. First of all, let’s be clear: I am not all that sure that the band even knows what they charge for concert tickets. As Simon has said many times, they don’t really get involved on the business side – after all, that is why they hire management, right? Second, I would agree that they probably don’t care. I think the band comes out on stage, sees that most of the seats are full – if in fact they can even see that well past the first several rows – and they go about their business of playing their set. They aren’t fixated on how much their shows cost, only what they need to do at the time. Third, Simon himself (and I’m sorry to “pick” on Simon, it just so happens he’s the one who I remember making any mention of this subject) has said that when a fan buys a ticket to their show, they are getting a terrific value for their money.  So I think we all know where he stands, and I can’t blame him.

As the thread continued, another Duranie friend chimed in.  She’s seen them quite a bit over the years, and flat-out refuses to spend so much money to see a band that she’s seen so often. She continued by saying that their latest releases have underwhelmed her, and that also plays a part in her decision not to attend shows. I can’t argue with any of that, either. I mean, why pay to see a band that is putting out music you’re not into? Fair enough.

The one question that always seems to come up during these conversations is whether or not the band is really just into it for the money.  Now, before you hit the comment button here – I KNOW WHAT THE BAND HAS SAID. John Taylor has said in more than one Katy Kafe that it is not just about the money for them. I KNOW.  I would simply ask what do any of us think they’d really say in public?? I highly doubt ANY band would openly say they are still working and performing purely for the money. Even if we don’t think they’re ONLY in it for the cash (which for the record I do not), let’s be fair: making money is part of the deal. It’s called business.

Curiously, the answer to that one little question matters to fans. We white knuckle the belief that the band we love really is not about taking us for everything we’ve got and are willing to part with, to see them.  Yet I think most of us know in our heads that money has to enter into it all somewhere.  The question is, where is that line between having a successful career and selling out purely for cash drawn, and why?

Discussion points are continually made that the band isn’t continuing to sell out massively large venues, and that they’re playing Festivals and casinos. No argument there, although I have pointed out in some conversations that this past summer – they definitely came close to selling out at least some of the venues they performed in that while touring with Chic.  I’ll admit, in my own personal opinion, the ticket prices were pretty high (considerably so if you bought VIP, which I did).  While no, they aren’t playing the same size venues this spring [in the US], the ticket prices have not come down that much. I do see other bands besides Duran Duran on occasion, and while I pay the most to see DD (VIP cost having a lot to do with that so to some degree it is my own fault and I own that), I have found that other tickets are still expensive. It’s just not cheap to go to concerts anymore unless you’re willing to sit in the back or on the lawn.

This is not just about priority for fans. The implication that if you really want to see Duran Duran you’ll pay the price and if you’re just a fair-weather fan, you probably won’t and that’s your problem, is distasteful.That belief gives far too much leeway in passing judgment on others. After all, five years ago, I could afford to do whatever show(s) I wanted, and didn’t have to work outside of the home. Now, I can’t, and I work. Things change, and it isn’t just about priorities. There are real fans of the band who have just gotten to the point where they feel as though the ticket prices are too high to see the same basic set list, or to see songs from albums that just have not hit home.

In closing, I’ll throw out one more sub topic to mull over.  In recent weeks, Amanda and I have had conversations about where the band sits in the overall hierarchy of popularity.  The band (DDHQ) markets their success with Paper Gods.  I made the comment to Amanda just this past weekend that if one listened to management, it is easy to believe that things have never been better for the band.  On the other hand, the energy and buzz have certainly changed over the years we’ve written this blog. It is vastly different now, for a variety of reasons. It is difficult to really grasp the true interest level. On one hand, they can sell out the Hollywood Bowl when touring with Chic. On the other hand, they tend to go for the low hanging fruit and play festivals. They have the opportunity to play for huge crowds without the risk of booking massive venues on their own.  They also play a lot of casino shows.  More and more often, I read of long time fans decide to sit out shows and tours, saying that they’ve given enough to the band over the years.  Is it just the people I follow, or is it a growing trend, and why? Is it our age? Our circumstances? The cost? Are we really that worried about whether the band is only in it for the money these days – or is it just reason to complain?

-R

 

 

On this date in 2011, there was a show in Bournemouth, UK

 

On this date in 2011, there was a show in Bournemouth, UK.

I know this because I was there.

This was the second of four shows Amanda and I were to attend in the UK. We began our day in Brighton, after having attended our first show the night before. This day though, was special. We were not going to be traveling to Bournemouth by train as we’d originally thought, but instead, we were going by car with new friends.

One might think that taking a trip by car from one venue to the next wouldn’t constitute much in the way of memories, but I have to tell you—it is what I remember most about the trip.

Yes, of course I have memories from the shows. That goes without saying. I remember the band taking the stage each night, I can remember the lights going ablaze during Before the Rain and the triumphant feeling that would go over the crowd as they were able to see the band. I remember the encores and how we’d be able to get closer to the stage and clearly see the expressions on the faces of the band. Those moments are golden.

What I am finding as time moves on, is that my memory for each individual show isn’t all that clear. I can’t remember which show I ended up in the very front row for the encore, for example. I do remember some things about each show, but more and more, the lines seem to be blurred. Meeting friends though?  This, I remember with clarity.

Michelle, Amy and Jo were kind enough to share their vehicle with us, and we had the best time. Truthfully, I have stronger memory of that car ride than I do of some of the shows I’ve been to, and these thoughts are what get me through some of the less-than-fun days that many of us all have from time to time.

I can remember getting to Bournemouth and going to our hotel, and then setting off for a walk through the shops. I loved Bournemouth. It was such a cute town, and the best part about the UK in general is that these towns are set up to encourage walking. Where I live in California, it just isn’t that way everywhere. We embrace our cars, which is a shame – we miss a lot that way, I think.

I bought a zebra-striped umbrella, looked at tiger-striped adult-sized onesies (Seven and the Ragged Tiger, don’t you know…), and then we went to dinner. The restaurant was wonderful, but the company is what made the dinner special. It usually is.  We even went to another nearby hotel for some tea and met with other friends – Julie and Alison. (I seem to remember the hotel being fancy, or posh as they say!) The show itself, I don’t remember quite as much. Usually it takes Amanda saying something to jar my memory, sadly.

I remember running into Faby – I think it was in Bournemouth – out of nowhere. I was so delighted to see her and Gerardo. The thought reminds me, even now, that our community is a family. We might not always agree or get along, but there is nothing like seeing one another after a long absence. I treasure these memories and hold on to them tightly during long hiatus when there is not much of anything going on.

The next morning, I can remember standing on the curb outside of the Premier Inn where we stayed (budget friendly, and if I recall – it was pretty nice, except for the bag breakfast including an inedible muffin and undrinkable coffee!). I could see the ocean, the sky was bright and clear, and it was deliciously cool outside. Coming from California, where it is almost always summer – the change in weather was a treat. I loved it.

The only thing I wish I’d been able to do, and this goes for all the cities we visited, was to stay longer. I would have enjoyed soaking in the culture (and the colder UK weather, believe it or not!), but we were on a mission.  I know I’ve said many times that I would like to go back, and I would. At one point in my life I took it for granted that of course I’d go back. Now, I have to admit I’m not sure if the opportunity will come, but if it does—I’d jump at it in a second.

Good memories.

-R

No Duran Duran Live?!

Lately, my questions of the day have focused on which songs people have seen Duran Duran perform in concert.  This idea came from the ever-frequent discussions regarding set lists and how there are many within the fan community who are tired of hearing the same old songs when they go to Duran Duran shows.  For example, I could do without Come Undone and Ordinary World, just saying.  Yet, as I started this set of questions, I heard from some fans that they have not had the opportunity of seeing Duran Duran in concert.  After hearing this more than I would have thought, I did what I usually do and began to wonder why, especially as someone who would like to understand fans and our fan community, in particular.

Could it be Duran Duran’s fault that some fans have not seen them i concert?  Are they a band that don’t tour much?  While there definitely has been times that they haven’t toured much, those dry spells don’t last forever.  Now, of course, the band tours in some places more than others.  For example, we are all aware that Duran Duran tours the U.S. a lot more than they do…many other places like South Africa or New Zealand.  So, I can definitely understand that for fans living in those rarely toured countries that they might not have had an opportunity to go.  The same is obviously true for those fans living in countries that the band has never toured.  Yet, it seems to me that there are many people living in the United States, for example, that haven’t seen Duran Duran.  Perhaps, for some of those fans, they might say that while Duran Duran comes to their country, they don’t come where they live.  That’s true for many states in the US.  For example, I don’t think Duran Duran has ever played in Alaska or Montana.  Heck, I live in Wisconsin.  The last time they played in this state was in 2005.  The last time they played in my city, though, was in 1984.  Therefore, if I want to see the band live, I know that I have to travel.  I have to.

This leads me to wonder if everyone can travel.  I’m sure that there are some reasons that might truly stop people from traveling.  For example, there might be some physical limitations due to health conditions that might stop people.  What else could stop people from traveling?  In the US, the main means of traveling are car/bus, train or plane.  Are those options all available to everyone in the hopes of getting to where Duran Duran might be playing?  For the most parts, cars/buses can get you anywhere you want to be in the lower 48 states.  You might need a lot of time, though, to get to where you want to go.  Trains would be a good alternative but they really aren’t available everywhere.  Planes are available in decent sized cities but do cost the most.  It is clear that traveling isn’t always super convenient either due to time it takes or the cost.  Many Duranies do accept this as a price to pay, though, in order to experience Duran live.  I know I do.  Ask anyone.  I’m not a fan of plane travel but…I do it.  I do it for Duran Duran concerts.

Speaking of prices to be paid, clearly, there is a cost involved to going to a Duran show.  Ticket prices have gone up since the first time I saw them, especially if one is interested in a VIP package and the opportunity for a really good seat.  That said, there are usually cheaper tickets available.  For example, the California Mid-State Fair that just went on sale had tickets starting at $41, which isn’t too bad.    I suspect that most people have to actually save money in order to go to any concert, but especially when it also requires money for traveling.  Speaking only for myself, I have to admit that I really do prioritize Duran Duran over lots of other things.  For example, I desperately need new carpeting and a new fridge.  Yet, those will get funded only AFTER my Duran fund has been met.  Some might think that it is crazy but that is my preference.  I figure that I can put a little bit away each month to feed my fandom.

Another aspect of going to Duran Duran concerts that I have is the fact that I have a touring partner, a buddy, a partner-in-crime.  I have someone to go to shows with and someone who I travel with.  That is huge.  Here is a little secret.  The main reason that I started hanging out at Duran Duran message boards was to find someone to go to shows with.  I knew that none of my close friends where I lived was into Duran.  Thus, I had to seek elsewhere and was lucky to find someone I have a ton of fun with!  Could this be the problem for some fans?  This is part of the reason that Rhonda and I do what we do here.  We are hoping to help others make connections and friendships with other fans.  We were lucky that we did.

What am I missing?  What else might stop someone for going to see Duran Duran live in concert?  To me, there is nothing better than going to see Duran Duran live.  Nothing.  I would love for everyone to be able to experience a Duran Duran show for themselves.

-A

Dear Duran Duran: About those Residencies…

Dear Duran Duran,

I had a lot of fun on this last little road trip of mine. Three shows is far more than I’ve had since August of 2012, and it was great seeing everyone on stage, right in front of me. I’m still smiling at the memories and cannot wait for more!

This time, Amanda and I, along with our friend Heather, drove ourselves from Hollywood to Berkeley and back to Rancho Mirage. While it was merely three shows, it felt like five due to the amount of driving and mileage covered. When I got home, I was ready to never see my car again. Alas, I live in Southern California and divorcing my car at this point is impossible.

My problem is this: you are killing me. I love you, but you’re killing me. Rest assured that while I am well-aware I’m probably the “loudest voice” due to this blog (which I’m told reaches a much larger audience than I think), I know with 100% certainty I am not the only fan feeling this way these days. When you come to the states on tour (and I am specifically referring to the states because it is where I live), your tours are designed in such a way where it is nearly impossible for those of us who wish to travel to see more than one show in a single trip to do so without attempting to kill ourselves in the process.

I don’t know if…or why… your promoters are unable or unwilling to see that you have a core group of people who actually do like to see you more than once on a tour, or maybe we’re such a small group that everyone thinks we don’t matter…but we’re still there, supporting! I personally know of a great number of fans who have simply just given up and stopped traveling to see you. Maybe they don’t even bother seeing you unless you come right to their town. Maybe they don’t even bother then. Attrition happens when your audience is in their… gasp…40’s. I know you still like to call us “kids”. I appreciate that, especially as I’m staring my 45th birthday in the face, and about to write another check for my 18-year old daughter’s room and board at university.  Not feeling kid-like this morning, really…but thanks!

The issue at hand is simply that when you come on tour, we want to pack in as many shows as we possibly can. For me personally, it’s not worth it financially (don’t get me wrong – you’re worth it, it’s just the whole “I have to pay for college, and for my family to eat” thing!) for me to fly all the way across the United States to only see you once or twice, never mind the time spent flying. In the last few trips Amanda and I have done, we’ve logged over 1,000 miles driving each time. (I think we drove 1600 miles in 2012 to go to 4 shows in the Southeast, and when you were here just recently in California we did about 1200 miles. I’m tired just thinking about it.) I don’t think anyone can say to Amanda and I with a straight face that we’re unwilling to do hard work for our fun.

I’m not sure if you’ve noticed, but the US isn’t particularly well-designed when it comes to their public transportation. While we have trains, they’re not particularly effective, and don’t even start with me about our buses. While one might take a train from London to Edinburgh and/or Glasgow to see a show in the UK and it’d take a full day…if I tried to do something similar here in the states, it’d take me 3 days to go that same distance by train, although admittedly some parts of the US are better about than others, but overall? Trains suck here. So we’re stuck either driving or flying. Flying is atrociously expensive unless you’re lucky, fly into cheap places, and plan well in advance. Driving is still far cheaper, but incredibly taxing.

Here’s the basic “tour” for Amanda and Rhonda: Fly into starting city/airport. Get rental car. Drive all day, get into a city in time to rush to the hotel, throw on concert attire and grab food on the way to the venue or the pre-show fan party we’ve got planned. Have a great time during and after the show, collapse for a few hours rest, and repeat again and again. Fly home, and in about 2 days, end up sick because once again we’ve burnt the candle at both ends.

So what to do? Miss shows? Skip shows so that we’re not exhausted?? Stop traveling altogether and just be happy when we can catch one close to home?  (Admit it, you’d miss me silently mouthing, “No, no, no!” and ducking during “White Lines”; or smirking, rolling my eyes, and shaking my head, before singing “Hungry Like the Wolf” with you, right?)

I still fall back to the same suggestion I had back in 2012 after I came home from the last tour. Why can’t you do more than one show in a city before moving on? Rather than have to travel (surely it has GOT to be tiring for Nick to be up before noon in order to be on DuranDuranOne) from place to place and hitting tons of smaller cities – why not pick destination cities in the US and perform at least a few shows at a time before moving on? People could fly, drive, take a train, etc to come into the city, and those who want to stay on in order to attend all of the shows in that destination, or visit with Duranies, go to a few pre-show parties, or flat-out take a vacation in the process would be able to do so. It might even encourage MORE fans to travel, and even if a fan couldn’t get to said-city for the first show, they might if there were more than one.  As a positive by-product, it’d allow for a lot more parties and get-togethers to happen. Who doesn’t want that?!?

I know at least a few of the arguments against residencies: they don’t allow for fans from all over to come unless they’re willing to travel, ticket sales may falter, it’s difficult to find theatre space willing to rent for consecutive nights, there’s a challenge in covering the entire US when you boil down a tour to only a few cities…etc. Let me try to address some of these issues. Granted, I’m just a very outspoken fan who likely needs a new hobby at this point, but at least I can try to articulate from my point of view.

In theory, I suppose when a band only pick a few cities to play it seems to make it difficult for fans who aren’t able to travel. However, I don’t see where it is any different from when a tour is announced and states like Tennessee or Nebraska are not included. People still have to travel. Is it more or less enticing to travel for one show, or three in the same city? Admittedly, ticket sales may be more of a challenge – I say that because I really don’t know. Although, I have to wonder if it really is any different to play three or four shows in one major city than playing three or four shows in smaller cities where fewer people may be willing to travel or pay to see a show. It isn’t as though Duran Duran doesn’t have an audience. Heck, this BLOG proves otherwise, even when you’re not actively touring or “in the news!” And yes, the US is huge in area and mileage/time needed to travel from place to place. I always laugh when people from other parts of the world complain about the amount of shows the US has booked on a tour. This is a big country. In order for me to get in my car and drive from Dana Point to the Atlantic Ocean, it would take me about four days. Five if I’m being realistic about needing to stop for food, gas, etc. People here in this country, for all of the reasons I just listed above, cannot really get to more than a few shows in a single trip. That’s exactly the point.

Maybe I just need to buy a Daily Duranie motor home. 

Never mind….

I’m not necessarily saying any of you in Duran Duran should plan a nine-date residency in Palm Springs; but I don’t think the idea of doing three or four shows in Las Vegas before moving on to Chicago for three or four dates, and then on to Boston or Toronto for four more, is really a horrible idea. It would give the band more down time to relax, less traveling overall, and it would likely present more enticement for fans less able and/or willing to travel for single shows reason to do so. And Daily Duranie would definitely make the trip(s)…because SOMEONE has to keep the fans busy before and after the shows, right?!?

(If one of you would just let my husband know…that’d be great!)

Truth: I have never planned a tour for a band, nor do I wish to begin now. I only know what it is like to BE a fan, and in particular, what it is like to be a Duran Duran fan. I can only offer suggestions that seem reasonable at the time. (granted, I am also the fan who has suggested, multiple times now, that you drop Hungry Like the Wolf from your setlist AND to make Dom Brown a permanent member. Apparently unreasonable suggestions. Who knew?!?) Yes, I had to get that dig in about Dom. It’s been a while, and somebody has to be on his side…. <wink>

Meanwhile, I wait for the ever-exciting 2016 tour announcement. Might I suggest (again, another suggestion…will I ever stop?!!) announcing this over the week of Thanksgiving here in the US. I’m going to be on vacation for that entire week, and likely sans cell coverage!! I’ve missed getting the sort of voice mails from Amanda that go a little something like this:

“Rhonda? You are NEVER going to guess what that band (I am censoring this for you, Duran Duran…only for you…) has done now.  Tour dates. Don’t worry, I will do what must be done! Just know that we’re going to shows, good luck telling Walt!!”

I’ve yammered on enough. I hope you get lots of rest during these few weeks off (right? you ARE taking time off, right?!?), and while I’m at it, remember that Amanda and I have been very good fans. Lately. 🙂

Love,

Rhonda

I Don’t Want to Wake Up

Has it really already been a week since I’ve been back home from this Duran Duran tour?!? I don’t even know where the time went. On one hand I feel as though I got back into the swing of things very quickly and feels very much as though I never left. On the other, I can’t believe a week has already gone by.

In many ways I let Amanda take the helm in describing the tour and how the shows were for us – she and I are typically on the same page when it comes to those things, and I knew she would convey exactly how I felt. On the other, I summed up my feelings about that 3-show “tour” with one tweet almost immediately after I walked out of the theatre at Agua Caliente.

“I may as well I may as well stop touring right now because I will never have a better show experience than tonight. Wow.”

I’ve said it before but it bears repeating here again that Amanda and I purchase our own tickets to the shows. We don’t ask the band for tickets.  I had a few people insinuate or flat-out ask, and while it’s a lovely thought that some people believe we matter, I think Amanda and I are well-aware that to 99.99% of the people involved with the band, we’re just a couple of fans who write a silly blog. We get it, and we don’t overstate or over-think our importance. In any case, that night at Agua Caliente, Amanda and I were in for a huge treat. We knew we had front row, but aside from that – we didn’t know much else. Neither of us had been to the venue and we were honestly more concerned with where our seats would be (meaning would we be in front of Simon, John, Nick, or Dom) than where the seats were in regards to the stage.

 As we walked down to our seats at Agua Caliente, we counted the chairs from the aisle and discovered we were right in front of Simon. I mean RIGHT in front. Then we realized there were no barricades between us and the stage. Finally, we quietly marveled that during the show, we could seriously lean our elbows ON the stage. I couldn’t believe it, and to be honest, I still can’t. As show time grew closer, our friends Krista and Sandy took their seats right next to us, and I knew before the band even took the stage that it was going to be the show experience of a lifetime.

It very much was – including being in the “spit zone” (Thank you Krista for taking the brunt of it…willingly…as I ducked behind you.  Yes, I did see you chuckling at our antics, Nicholas. I’m going to continue pretending that Simon did NOT veer ever so slightly in the direction of Amanda and I…We sort of had it coming though, didn’t we?)  There were so many moments during that show for me. Seeing Nick smile during Hungry Like the Wolf (I was a very good sport, thankyouverymuch…epitome of a well-behaved fan!!), watching Simon walking to the front of the stage like a man on a mission with a mouth-full of water as I thought to myself, “Oh boy…here we go…DUCK!”, having John and Dom flank either side of Amanda and I during Planet Earth, watching Roger twirl his drumstick during Sunrise…having Dom come over directly in front of me to play several times throughout the show, and shaking some of their hands at the end of the set.

Can I take a minute to write about the end of their set?? After the finale, they walked to the front of the stage as they typically do to say goodbye. I’m right there, basically becoming good friends with their feet, and examining their shoes and socks. (Nice striped socks, Dom…liked them with the leather pants!) I wish I could properly explain how I felt in that moment, but the words don’t really match the feeling. It was as though electricity was running through my body. I mean, I was inches from these men that I have adored since I was ten years old. I turn 45 next month. That’s a very, very long time. It was as though I couldn’t quite believe what my eyes and ears were telling me as I stood there, frozen to the floor. I didn’t even reach up to shake hands with them, because I couldn’t. I just smiled at them, tried to clap, mostly just stood there in shock (and awe!).

Nick stood in front of me for what felt like a long time, but I couldn’t even move my hand to shake his. It wasn’t out of disrespect, just the opposite really. I meant it when I said that my head couldn’t quite make sense of it at the time. I’m still not sure if I can. I did notice a faint, very quick glimmer of, well…what…recognition maybe??…in their faces as they would smile down at us and make eye contact. I couldn’t even let myself think about that at the time. I had difficulty just getting past the notion that I was standing there right directly in front of them. Yes, I’ve been writing this blog for five years now, and yes, I suppose that by a lot of accounts, I’ve had far more “experiences” with the band than many fans out there. However, I’ve never been right in front of them like this. Not in this way. It felt incredibly surreal. Daily Duranie or not, no matter how many readers we have, or the size of our real audience, or our post-reach on Facebook – I am still a fan. That’s exactly how I felt that night. I am still a fan like anyone else. I needed that.

Do you know what I was thinking about in that moment as they were all standing at the front of the stage?  I was remembering how I would sit on the edge of my bed, in my “Summertime Green” painted bedroom (Nasty, horrid bright green color, with orange carpeting no less.). I would stare at the biggest poster of them I had, which happened to be on my door, and wonder what it would be like to be right in front of them. Never in my wildest dreams did I ever think I’d write about them someday, or be in the front row at one of their shows (much less two or three), or actually KNOW what it felt like to be in front of them. Never.  How do you soak up the answers to 35-years worth of daydreams in less than two hours?

As they were leaving, Dom reached down and grabbed my hand and it was only in that second I kind of came back into present long enough to realize that he had my hand – only for a split second – but again, I’m trying to describe how I felt at the time. I’m pretty sure I shook Roger’s hand too, but I can’t remember now.

I don’t think I will ever have a show quite like that again. That thought both exhilarates me and makes me wistful all at once. I know what it’s like to be center “elbows on the stage” front row. I’m incredibly thankful I had the opportunity to experience those feelings. Even if my time never comes again – which likely not – I won’t let the memory slip my mind. I really can’t see what could possibly top those seats, and so when I jokingly yelled out, “I QUIT!!” after the last of the hand squeezes from the band took place and they all left the stage area, it was with the thought that I’d reached the pinnacle of what a fan could really experience.  There isn’t much more to “want”, aside from more of the same, maybe.

Almost oddly, I sit here today typing this thinking to myself that it’s a good thing that Amanda and I have had the chance to do so much, at least from the standpoint of writing and understanding ourselves as fans. I’ve sat in the very LAST row at a show (my very first one), and now I’ve sat in the very front row. I’ve been to the UK, seen Birmingham, walked Cheapside (If you do not know what Cheapside is, we need to talk. Seriously…email me!), had Simon stand directly in front of me, eye-to-eye and explain why the shows cannot go on as planned. I’ve lived through Twitter, Facebook, and message boards. I have had canceled gigs, various guitarists, and favorite band members leaving only to return 20-some years later. I have watched MTV, read magazines like Star Hits and Tiger Beat, as well as rely on getting news solely from the radio and other fans. I’ve completely missed tours, been disappointed with albums, and overjoyed by others. I don’t know if I’ve done it ALL (actually, I know for sure that I have not…), but I know that I’ve experienced a lot, and those adventures, moments, and nuggets of knowledge come in very handy when you’re writing a fan blog.

I know what it is like to be a fan, and I continue to walk the fine line between writing about it, running a blog, and experiencing it as anyone else might. Amanda and I always say we know what fans want because we ARE fans…and that’s the truth. I only hope we continue to cover the things that matter with the same amount of love, affection and excitement as we do right in this moment. I’m looking forward to planning the next set of Duran Duran tour dates, meet-ups, parties, and hopefully a reasonable road trip as we witness the upcoming UK dates from afar.

-R

Leather Pants! Sparkly Jackets! Backstage at the Hollywood Bowl!

By Janet McCabe

I was fortunate enough to snag a Platinum package for DD’s historic show at the Hollywood Bowl through the fan club pre-sale. I say “fortunate” because, subsequently, I met many fellow Duranies at the pre-show reception who had tried and failed to get the Platinum package!  (Ed note: Fun Fact – Amanda and Rhonda were two more of those people!!) The most exciting thing about the package — apart from the front-row seat — was the backstage tour. Since I was also lucky enough to be sitting right in front of Daily Duranies Rhonda and Amanda during the show, I promised to do a write-up of the backstage tour for Daily Duranie!!

I didn’t really know what to expect from the backstage tour, but I have to say that the communication prior to the event was handled very well. DDVIP sent very detailed instructions that were very helpful. Here are a couple relevant excerpts from the email that was sent to Platinum package purchasers!!

Greetings from Duran Duran Headquarters!

Thank you so much for purchasing a PLATINUM package to the band’s show at the legendary Hollywood Bowl on October 1st. We look forward to seeing you for the backstage tour and VIP pre-show reception! You will check in at the table in front of the Museum Garden. … Please arrive to check in between 5:15pm and 5:30pm SHARP. If you are not there at 5:30pm you can still enjoy the reception but will miss the backstage tour.

Feel free to text if you have any URGENT issues. Please include your first and last name in your message. Please ONLY use her number the day of the show.

A few important notes:! !

– There is NO meet and greet associated with the reception or backstage tour and the band will not be in attendance!

– Please stay with the group and if you see a performer backstage do NOT approach them unless the concierge has introduced you to them!

– If you stray from the group backstage you will be removed from the venue and not issued a refund (so please do not try to wander into dressing rooms etc). Please stay with the tour. ! !

Armed with this information, I set out from my Beverly Hills hotel around 4:30, expecting to arrive at the Bowl around 5:15, based on what the locals had told me about travel time. Note to self: do not believe the locals about travel time!!

(Rhonda’s note: actually a REAL local will always tell you that if you are in the LA/Hollywood area on any given day, at any given time, with the possible exception of like 3-3:45am,  you can expect a drive of at least an hour, no matter whether you’re going down the block, or five miles away… or even out of the city completely. Our traffic is horrendous here. Just saying.  – a Los Angeles Native)

It was only due to my cab driver’s miraculous (reckless?) driving, including a U-turn in the middle of Hollywood Boulevard, that I made it to the Bowl in time to take the tour. Truth be told I was a few minutes early, but terrified that I’d miss the tour, I actually resorted to texting the concierge for the event. Let’s call her “A.” I texted A and told her my situation. She was very friendly and understanding. She didn’t say they’d wait if I was late, but as I chewed on my nails,consulting Google Maps every few seconds to see how far I was from the Bowl (in case I needed to leave the cab and run for it), she joked with me by text about how I was getting closer and how I had better tip the cabbie well (I did).

After checking in at the VIP table, I waited for a few minutes, and then A and her partner-in-crime for the tour — we’ll call him “L” — gathered us up to begin the tour. There were about six of us on the tour, and I got the impression that a couple of people didn’t show (they’re probably still sitting in traffic). The group was much smaller than I expected, but it explains why it was so hard to get a Platinum seat! At this point, A and L introduced themselves. They have both worked with the Duran organization for some time, and while they didn’t give us their formal titles, it seems that they are part of a logistics team that coordinates between front office, back office and fans. And, apparently, that includes giving tours. L did most of the talking and, as we were led away from the meeting table through various security checkpoints, he explained that we would be able to take pictures on some parts of the tour and not on others.

The first thing we saw was the backlot, where the tour buses and the trucks that carry the stage and musical equipment park. We did not get to go on any tour busses. Then we were led inside to the area where the performers’ dressing rooms are. This is where that line from the email came into my head: “if you see a performer backstage do NOT approach them unless the concierge has introduced you to them.” It was going to be hard to restrain myself should we run into one of the members of Duran Duran. I’ll end the suspense now and tell you that we didn’t see them. 🙁

The first thing we saw was the warm-up room where John and Roger warm up. In it was a stripped down drum kit, a bass and a small amp, so Rog and John can get their groove on pre show.

Roger's practice set

John's practice bass

Across the hall from that room was the dressing room for “female performers,” presumably Anna Ross, Jessie Warner, and the ladies from Chic and Clean Bandit. I don’t remember seeing any dressing rooms with “stars” and specific names on them (because I definitely would have taken pictures had I seen that).

Farther down the hall was the my favorite part of the tour: the wardrobe room. L and A brought us into the room and introduced us to Jeffrey, the band’s wardrobe manager. Jeffery was very welcoming and friendly, telling us all kinds of interesting things. Here are some of the tidbits I remember:

• Each of the guys has an array of pieces in the room from which they can pick and Jeffrey doesn’t know what they’ll pick from show to show.

Nick's clothing rack

shoes\

IMG_4580

 

• Jeffrey predicted that Simon might wear his black, sequined tuxedo jacket since the show was so special (hello, it’s the Hollywood Bowl!). The tuxedo jacket is an Yves Saint Laurent, and Jeffrey says that the band have acquired a fondness for his pieces lately.

Simon's tuxedo jacket

Simon's Jacket (2)

• As we all know now, that prediction turned out not to be accurate, as Simon wore a black and white motorcycle jacket. The black and white leather jacket that Simon wore for the show was made by Jeffrey. If memory serves, it’s a knock off of another jacket but made from slightly lighter materials so it’s not so warm under stage lights.

Simon's Moto Jacket

Simon's clothes

More shoes

skull pants

Jeffrey was very gracious and allowed us to take pictures and, yes, to touch some of the pieces. I could have stayed in that room all night, but we were off to our next stop, which was down the hall and down the path that the performers take from dressing room to stage.

We were escorted to the stage entrance area and allowed to walk right up to the edge of stage right, but not to walk out on stage, especially since there were already folks in the seats, waiting for the show to start.

When we returned from the edge of the stage, L and A introduced us to several other members of the Duran management and touring team, including Wendy Laister (a name many of you probably recognize – she’s Duran Duran’s manager) and Orla, their tour manager. Wendy, Orla and a few other folks were huddled a small room that appeared to be the nerve center for the operation, and Orla took a few moments out of a very busy time to chat with us.

In fact, Orla said that she and the team had been at the Bowl since 6 or 7 a.m. that morning (it was 6 p.m. by this time). She talked to us about the demands and the intricacies of managing the tour and mentioned that there were several different sets of stage equipment. While one was being set up and then broken down at the Hollywood Bowl, another was on its way to the next gig and, once the Hollywood Bowl set was broken down, it would be off to another future show. It reminded me of what it must be like to be an air traffic controller — managing hundreds of small details, all in real-time.

She also talked to us about how the sound is monitored and how the mix in the guys’ earphones is achieved, each customized to ensure they hear what they need to hear in order to keep in time and tune.

After we said goodbye to Orla, we headed back outside. As we headed back out past the loading bays and the trucks, back toward the public areas, we did spot one Mr. Nile Rogers sitting outside in a chair, chatting with another fellow who was working the show. While I’m sure we all wanted to call out to Nile and/or run up to him, we didn’t. His head was turned, and he was engrossed in conversation, but I think if he had seen us, he probably would have come over to say hello, based on his graciousness in dealing with fans (signing autographs, posing for selfies, etc.) before and after the Chic set.

As we walked out, I was chatting with A and told her that I enjoyed the tour and that I was really impressed with the way that the pre-sale and the arrangements for the tour had been handled by Duran’s management and Crowdsurge, in contrast to some of the experiences with past companies. She was pleased to hear it and said they are always looking for ways to make the fan experience better and special.

Perhaps most impressive, apart from getting to fondle Simon’s sparkly leather pants (not while he was in them, sadly), was the hospitality and warmth that everyone we encountered on the tour displayed toward us. L and A really were great ambassadors for the band, and even during a very busy time, all of the team members we encountered seemed genuinely happy that we were there, entertained our questions and thanked us for being there.

All in all, it was a great experience, and I hope everyone who wants a Platinum Package is able to receive one, should Duran offer it as part of the 2016 tour packages. See you all in 2016!

 

Janet McCabe Janet has been a Duranie since 1982 when she was in high school (no fair guessing her age). She lives in St. Petersburg, FL, is a Corporate Communications exec for a global bank, and enjoys documentary film and kayaking/snorkeling in her spare time. A lifelong Simon fan, she had the great pleasure of meeting him (as well as Dom and Roger) at a pub after a show in Chicago in 2011. At last count, Janet has seen the band about 15 times — traveling as far as Milan, LA and Chicago — and has plans to see as many shows in 2016, both foreign and domestic, as her work schedule and financial advisor will allow.

This is How We Stay Connected

Well, I’ve hit the wall.  Or maybe I should say I’ve hit the door. I can’t really decide at this moment.  What I can do is describe how I’m feeling. It’s that point where I finally come down from the concert high and realize that I have at least months, if not years, until the next road trip, tour, concert or band member sighting.

That’s depressing.

The thing is, with all due respect to John, Simon, Nick, Roger AND Dom (can’t forget him!)…it’s not even necessarily all about them. It’s knowing that it will probably be six months to a year before I see Amanda again. (Does anyone else find it even mildly perplexing as to how we can run this site even though we are hardly EVER in the same state, much less the same room?!?) It’s realizing that evenings spent laughing over a table filled with, well…empty glasses…are a long way off again, never mind the days spent driving while trying to compile “just the right” set list to either drive people crazy, or make them laugh. (I think that depends on whether it’s Simon LeBon reading or another fan reading…and maybe not necessarily in that order!)  It’s recognizing the absence of friends. Even though I chat with most of them online each day at some point, it isn’t the same as being able to walk up to one of them and give them a hug or look at one another during a show and know we’re thinking the same thing. I miss them.

I’ve unpacked my bag, done laundry for everyone in the house, cleaned up the whirlwind I walked in on Sunday night, and have even caught up on and cleaned out emails and texts. I’ve looked at pictures, sat back and smiled at some particularly amusing memories, and wistfully daydreamed about others. I’ve bought groceries, and aside from a morning spent in urgent care (it turns out I will live), my life went back to normal just as quickly as the few days away seemed to pass. The band has since moved on to New York. Another album signing, another festival, and they’ll be headed back home to regroup before the UK shows take place in November. Life always seems to return itself to normal, no matter what happened the week prior.

I just don’t know how I get through this each time…whatever “this” is. I suppose it’s a bit of concert let-down. At first, I suppose I strive to keep talking about the shows or anecdotes from the road trip, as though by mentioning them it will keep everything fresh and alive. Then I start noticing the absence of people I care about, whether it’s that they don’t really tweet much, or that I don’t see them online very often, or just that I can’t pick up the phone every time I need to chat. I start thinking about how long it might be before I see them again, and what I can do in the meantime to make it easier. Let’s face it: Amanda is my best friend and we honestly spend about a week together (give or take a day or two) over the course of an entire year in the same place. Skype helps, but I don’t have the opportunity to Skype with everyone I miss. Yeah, it’s pretty depressing and I hate going through it. So what can really be done?

Well, for Amanda and I: we run this blog. It takes up a lot of our time as is, and invariably when we’re together, we come up with a brand new list of things we want to do, need to do and HAVE to do in order to keep it all going. I have to laugh because since I’ve been home, I’ve worked 10-hour days trying to catch up, clear out and read up on some things we’re hoping to do. While doing that now infamous road trip last week, we came up with brand NEW crazy ideas to pass the time, like a pumpkin-carving contest and adding a message board.  Our theory is basically that if we can’t have a Duranie community living in each of our respective towns, we can create one in a central place online. No, we’re not duranduranmusic.com, and this is not a fan club…but we are a community, and anyone can join. So that’s our goal going forward: to continue making this little blog into a real community. We’re going to run contests, have discussions, start a forum and continue planning for future meet-ups and even conventions; because as fans ourselves, we know what we want in a fan community. We’ll also stay funny, because well…we amuse ourselves, sometimes beyond reason!

No, I really can’t tell anyone here in the US for certain when John, Simon, Nick, Roger and Dom will be back for more. I don’t really know for sure when or where our next road trip or meet-ups will take place (But I will just throw this out to the powers that be – the more notice, the better – even if it’s just the name of the city, because that way we can plan. We can put together a trip plan, figure out meet-up times, and even do room blocks at hotels, which ultimately helps everyone in the long run). I only know that more is to come, and until then, we’re going to try our best to keep everyone busy.

In the meantime, if you happen to be well-versed in websites and have direct experience adding message boards to existing sites…shoot me an email.

-R

 

Paper Gods CA Tour: The Aftermath

It is fun to get away, and really nice to come home. That is exactly how I would characterize this past little road trip on all accounts. In some respects, being with friends and seeing #Duranlive again really felt like coming home; and in other ways, walking into my house last night after a long weekend of driving 1200 miles, some mild debauchery was really welcome. I’m tired!!

For a lot of fans, the joy of a tour comes from seeing the band. This is obvious – I mean, one goes to a show and sees the band play. Done and done, right? Then there are the other people, like me, who have gone to “more than a few” shows over the years, and have made quite a circle of friends as result. The shows go from being solely about the band to being about having a reunion of sorts.  It isn’t all about the band any longer. Don’t get me wrong, they’re still a huge part of the allegory (indirect storytelling, usually used in reference to large paintings). The band is like the background, and the connections, relationships, and friendships are the details.

This past week was a perfect example of the community that this band has created, whether by design, or circumstance. I drove to Hollywood on Tuesday to see Duran Duran at the Jimmy Kimmel show, and as I walked in the 93 degree heat to the back of the theatre, I immediately saw friends. Suddenly the afternoon wasn’t defined solely by the torture of standing on a very hot sidewalk while trying not to melt; instead we talked, laughed, and maybe even squealed in delight when we saw the band arrive, caught a glimpse of Mr. Hudson and Dom speaking on stage (We were peaking through the chain-link fence bordering the property!), and especially when we heard the sounds of “You Kill Me With Silence” mixing with the exhaustive late-afternoon heat. Even without Amanda present, I felt completely at home with friends I hadn’t seen since April or prior as we filed past security and found space to stand in front of the stage. When the band finally filtered onto the stage, it was clear they were just as happy to see us – smiles of recognition and surprise exchanged, as the next layer of details began to be added to our story.

During the next 24-hours, Amanda arrived (it is so nice to have both halves of Daily Duranie together!), our friend Heather arrived from Canada, and we found ourselves doing more laughing and talking over, yes – drinks – at more than one bar in the city. (I even got Amanda to eat at In-N-Out, which was a MIRACLE!!! She had grilled cheese, since she’s a vegetarian. She survived!)  The next day we paid (Ok, I paid) for the activities of the day prior, and then we hosted our fan meet-up at the Hollywood-Highland Hard Rock Cafe. I never quite know how these things are going to go. I’m not confident enough to assume that everyone who RSVP’s is actually going to show up, so I spend at least part of the time worrying. I needn’t this time, because we had about 50 DD fans show up to celebrate with us. It was fantastic! There were friends from near and far, and some as far away as Canada. We loved seeing people come up to our area as virtual strangers and end up leaving with new contacts and friends – that is the whole point! We’re proud to be a small portion of the catalyst that brings people together. We sat at a series of lined up tables, talked, laughed and reminisced our way through bad service until it was time to leave for the VIP party at the Hollywood Bowl.

The Bowl itself was another story – 17,000+ people is “kind of” a lot, and I found it to be a giant clusterfuck of activity. Not that it was a bad thing – but after floating with the crowd through the gates and up to our seats, I just stayed put. Even so, friends were tweeting throughout the venue, and it was clear that many of us were all there together to support the band. There’s something incredibly unifying about that. I know the band probably loved the idea of so many “new” people in the crowd for them (and rightly so!), but as a long time fan, there was a part of me that loved knowing so many diehards (like me) were there too, experiencing and probably exhibiting the same pride and affection that I felt that night. That’s good stuff!

After the show, there was a cocktail party for the band and friends, family, and industry types. As I’m sure most know – Amanda and I were shockingly left off the guest list!! (read: sarcasm.) I had a male friend ask where I was that night because he was at the party and spoke with one of my close friends. I appreciate the vote of confidence, but let’s face it: I’m no celebrity or rock star, and no “friend of mine” offered to get me in. (cough, cough) So once again we floated back down the hill with the crowd, got into our shuttle, and spent the next 45 minutes in traffic waiting to get back to our parking spot at the Hollywood-Highland Center (next time, I’m walking). Then we changed into proper driving attire (read: comfortable), and boarded the Duranie “bus.” (my car, which is not really a bus at all) for a 3-hour drive before we stopped for the night. We spent that trip listening to Duran Duran, talking about the show (it was our friend Heather’s very first DD show ever), exchanging texts with a friend who was at the cocktail party, and dishing over the shows to come.

Our next bit of activity took place the next day as we cruised into Berkeley. Another Duranie friend (that we’d never met in person, no less) did us the kindness of planning a get-together for dinner before the show in Berkeley, so our pre-show was once again spent with friends – both old and new – laughing about everything under the sun. By the time we walked back up through the UC Berkeley campus to the venue, we were in a great mood, tired or not, ready for a fantastic show ahead. As we sat in our seats that night, anxious for Duran Duran to take the stage, several really great friends that we hadn’t seen in a long time came up to see Amanda and I. I loved seeing everyone, and it reminded me that our Duran-world is small and closer-knit than we might think.

After the show, Amanda and I agreed to go for drinks (As the bus driver, I had water, thankyouverymuch.) with our friends Melissa and Julie. We walked back down through the now very much drunken side streets of UC Berkeley on the way to find a bar.  I’d forgotten the fun of Friday nights in a college town, and I’d also forgotten that we were about twice the age of most of the kids present, but we still found a great place to hang out for a while as we relaxed and rehashed the show, and only got a few sideways-looks from the kids who showed up for beer and giant-sized Jenga.

The next day, we started our long trek to Rancho Mirage, which is in the California desert near Palm Springs. 7-and-a-half hours is a long time to spend in the car, even if it’s MY car.  Even so, we spent our time wisely: devising a set list of epic magnitude, that we then tweeted directly to Simon, John (yes I know he’s no longer active on Twitter.) and DDHQ, similar to what we’d done in the days prior. Why? Because yes, we are as obnoxious as possible sometimes. As Amanda and I made the initial list of songs, and then meticulously discussed the order in which the songs should be presented (we even created a medley), our friend Heather remained mostly silent in the back seat. Out of nowhere, Heather mused, “If people only knew how much time and energy you two spend on every single detail…” Amanda and I just started laughing. It was a silly set list, but we wanted it to be perfect.  Can you think of a better way to spend 7 hours in the car?!?

Saving the best for last, we arrived at Agua Caliente and hauled our luggage upstairs to the room where our friend Shelly was waiting. We didn’t even make it all the way down the hall before Shelly was out the door, into the hall and hugging us. It was like coming home. We quickly ordered pizza, changed clothing and got ready to go downstairs for another Daily Duranie meet-up in the bar. We arrived at Rendezvous to Shannon and her friends waiting at a table. We quickly commandeered our own table, ordered a round for ourselves and let the party unfold. So many Duranies showed up that night – I lost count, but it was fantastic. We met new friends like Liz “@Adora2000” and Suzie “@STOgonewild” along with many others that I am completely forgetting…and still an absolute ton of longtime Duran fans reuniting, hugging, giggling, talking, and contemplating our collective journey. We talked Paper Gods, band members, touring band members, future touring hopes, and leather pants, of all things. Before we knew it, showtime was upon us and we were ready.

Post-show saw continued festivities in Rendezvous (liked the hotel, did not enjoy the cigarette smoke in the air which threatened to leave me sans voice), with a somewhat smaller, but louder(!!) group of fans. Amanda and I were treated to a few rounds of drinks by a reader named Richard (thanks again!!), and LOTS of laughter. Despite( or even in spite?) of it being the last show for a while, we remained joyful, replaying the entire show, elbows on stage and all, over and over as we sat at the table until wee hours of the morning when a few tweets from a certain guitarist signaled that the band had made their way safely back to Los Angeles and on to whatever came next. For Amanda and I, it meant a short night of sleep before once again climbing back into the Duranie bus for a trip to LAX.

Today, I’m at home.  I’m about to get ready and get in the car one more time to drive Heather back to LAX so that she can board a plane bound for Canada. I’m in disbelief that the good times have ended, so I’m simply saying I need to give the band a break from me for a while. I mean, there’s only so much of me one can take, never mind the rest of you, who seem to keep coming back and reading again and again, of which Amanda and I are so thankful.  Seeing the band again was so fantastic, and I have a whole set of memories about the shows and interacting with them that I haven’t even began to touch upon here, but I wanted to share the memories I have with a lot of YOU from the weekend. In the end, those moments matter just as much, if not more.

Simon said something at a couple of the shows that really struck home with Amanda and I, because we’ve said it many times! He talked about how after they create the music, they really give it to the fans and it becomes ours. Then they go on tour, and share it with us – and it becomes a sort of cyclical process where they give the music, we take it and then we give energy back to them – it’s really synergy in that respect – but the point is that we’re part of the cycle.  Amanda and I have talked about that many times here on the blog (MANY. TIMES.), and I want to encourage everyone – when they announce tour dates, find the time and go. I can’t create a proper picture in words of what that band does at a show, or how I feel when I have had a long weekend with the friends I’ve made as a result.

You just need to go, and I’ll see you there.

-R

It’s 1:40am, Amanda – WTF am I gonna write about?

There are some rumors that Duran Duran is going to be playing a show later today.

For those keeping track, this post is being written at 1:40am.  Welcome to touring, ladies and gentlemen.  After a night of hanging out in a (very) dark bar off of Sunset, I realized that I would likely have no other time to blog today.  So…this is it!

Today, err…I mean yesterday…was spent wandering around Hollywood and Highland, and drinking. I don’t even want to consider how much vodka was consumed, but I can tell you that tonight, as a small group of us sat in Bar 1200 at the Sunset Marquis, we first heard “Save a Prayer” and later, “Rio.”    Earlier we hung out at another bar called Royal, and prior to that, we paid homage to the Hard Rock Cafe.  We sat, we laughed, and we waited for our friend Heather to fly into Southern California.

Later today, Amanda and I are escorting Heather – a friend we met through our own Durandemonium convention two years ago – to her VERY FIRST DURAN DURAN SHOW. Heather is easily as big a fan as Amanda and I, and yet due to circumstance and geography, she’s never actually been to a show. When this information was first made known to us back at Durandemonium, Amanda and I promised that we would take her to a show on the next tour. I’m fairly certain that when we made that promise, Heather thought that we were insane and just agreed with us for good measure. We may be insane, but we also keep promises. Not only are we taking Heather to her first Duran Duran show, we’re taking her to her first three, and she has fucking AWESOME seats for each of them!

Truth be told, all of us are exhausted, probably a little drunk, and definitely overdue for Duran shows – but none of us more so than Heather.  I personally cannot wait to have LeBon and Co. step out onto that stage while I watch Heather’s head spin on its axis.  As much as I love seeing the band, and it cannot be said strongly enough that I do love seeing them – I think watching her reaction to the spectacle will make it all that much more meaningful and exciting.

I can barely remember the excitement that went into my first show. That was in 1989, and by that time – the fab five was no more, but nothing could have popped the balloon of joy I had floating around me at the time. Watching Heather participate in those same moments of joy will definitely make the experience that much more meaningful for me, now 30+ shows into my journey.

So, now that I head off to bed, with visions of sparkly jackets, leather pants and ginger-haired guitar players in my head, I can hardly wait to see what later today brings for my friend from the north.

The band had better be ready to bring it.

-R

Life is Beautiful Festival

Duran Duran will be playing the Life is Beautiful festival in Las Vegas, Nevada September 25-27.   The event will be headlined by Stevie Wonder, Imagine Dragons, and Kendrick Lamar, alongside some amazing acts such as Hozier, Brandon Flowers, Death Cab For Cutie, Twenty One Pilots, Awolnation, and the list goes on.

Tickets are on sale now (early bird tickets went on sale 5/8) and prices currently begin at $235 for a 3-day Advance GA pass and go up to a heart-stopping $2450 for a 3-day VIP pass that includes everything from a private VIP bar to shaded seating…which is really the ONLY way to see a festival in the heat of Las Vegas in September if you can afford the ticket price!