Tag Archives: INXS

A couple memories for November 22

Today, the day before Thanksgiving, finds me in the kitchen. Not my favorite place in the world by a long shot, but I am in there, chopping, mixing, cooking and cleaning. I’m sure some of you are thinking, “Well, that’s lovely. I’m at work. I would rather be at home in my own kitchen!”

Touché.

I am not at work today. So there’s that. A little gratitude here, right?

On this date in 2010, it was announced that Nick Egan would direct the video for “All You Need is Now”.  As I’m typing this, I’m considering just how familiar Nick Egan’s style might be to Duranies at this point. The black and white contrast, the band performing, even the lighting is all relative to Nick Egan’s direction. Personally, out of the videos Nick Egan directed for Duran Duran, my favorite happens to be this one, “All You Need is Now”. I like that there’s a bit of a storyline, and I am partial to the walk through Brompton Cemetery.

 

I would be neglectful if I didn’t also pay tribute to someone the music community lost on this date. Michael Hutchence, the lead singer of INXS, left us in 1997.  It is both difficult to believe twenty years has passed since the pain of that loss is ever-present for so many, and yet it feels like forever. I think it is fair to say that music has not been quite the same.

Since I’m supposed to be cooking, I’m gonna find a couple/few INXS videos to share. Die hard fans may groan, but they’re some of my favorite.

To those who, like me, will be doing the cooking thing on Thanksgiving, I salute you! To the rest of you, be kind to the cook!! 😀

-R

 

Daily Duranie Special Report: F.O.L.D. Festival

We know it’s been a couple of weeks since the F.O.L.D festival, but we don’t think anyone is going to mind revisiting the show in anticipation of upcoming tour dates! Thanks to our special correspondents “on the scene”, we’re able to bring readers a taste of these amazing shows!  -R

 

By Michelle Duran (Daily Duranie Contributor)

I hate festivals. I hate shortened set lists, I hate being surrounded by fans of other bands who only know ‘Hungry Like a Wolf’ (grrr!!!), I hate sitting through sets of artists I don’t like, and I absolutely hate port-a-potties. This isn’t just my mantra but that of many other Duran Duran fans I know.  Add to it the horrific New York – Long Island summer commuter traffic and why would any of us want to go to the Martha Clara Vineyard in Riverhead, Long Island for the two day F.O.L.D. (Freak Out Let’s Dance) Festival?

For starters, this wasn’t just any music festival. Organized by Duran Duran’s self- proclaimed big brother, and musical genius extraordinaire, Nile Rodgers, he promised it would be something special and it most certainly was. This was THE ONE, Duranies, the one that made the lack of indoor plumbing and the possibility of traffic congestion all worthwhile.

My friends and I opted for general admission tickets for Day 2, the day the band was to play. Parking lots were to open at 4 pm and the venue at 5 pm with the show beginning at 6 pm. Due to the winery being in a residential area, there was an 11 pm curfew, meaning that the concert would be no more than five hours. I’ve endured twelve plus hour music festivals in the blazing summer sun before so five hours in the evening at a winery sounded pretty good. While we were enroute to the winery, a friend messaged us that the lots opened early. What followed was a series of sharp corners and possibly illegal U-turns when I drove past the entrance for the parking lots not once, but three times. Finally, we made it, parked our car and were ready to queue. There were about twenty people in front of us, including several Duranies. The line was sheltered by tall shrubs along the vineyard, so not only was it a beautiful place to wait but it was also shaded and relatively comfortable. The festival staff, dressed in black shirts and shorts, presided everywhere. All were polite and professional. The stage was only about fifty feet from the entrance and we arrived to hear the incomparable Chaka Khan warming up, which was amazing.  After she finished, we were treated to something even better- Duran Duran’s sound check.  Thanks to Twitter posts by the band, we confirmed what our ears already knew,  Janelle Monae and Nile were with them running through Pressure Off several times. In addition, we heard snippets of Notorious, and Wild Boys. Try as we might, we couldn’t see the stage from where we were standing. However, we heard a crowd cheering and found out that VIP ticketholders were allowed in front of the stage to watch the sound-check. In true Duran fashion, the sound-check ran late and they were still on stage when the gates were supposed to open at 5 pm. By this time the line snaked down quite a distance. The only complaints I heard were from a few older fans of some of the other acts. The rest of us know Durantime is always in effect and took it in stride.  At 5:15, some of the staff came through the queue to apologize and hand out free bottles of water to those waiting, which was a nice touch.

Gates finally opened a few minutes later and we were in. Thanks to a tip from a friendly photographer (heyjoe.nyc) we’d met at breakfast, we knew the right side of the stage was only for VIP.  My friends and I bee-lined for the left side of the stage and found spots directly in front of where John would be, with only the photo pit separating us from the stage. The crowd itself was a mix of older fans of Nile, Chaka Khan, and the other “old school” performers; Duranies; music loving locals from the area; and a few younger fans there for the EDM (Electronic Dance Music) acts. Due to the selection of performers, I think the crowd was older than the usual age at a music festival of this nature.

After a few minutes, the music started with international celebrity DJ, Greg Cerrone, who fit F.O.L.D. Festival between gigs in St. Barth’s and Saint Tropez. The crowd was fairly small at this point, fewer than one thousand, but his enthusiastic attitude never waned.  I have to admit, EDM is not my thing. I may think I’m still twenty five but EDM proves I’m not. The heavy electronic bass pounding through my body and trying to take control of my heart isn’t something I enjoy, especially when I’m right in front of the speakers. However, there were plenty of people in the crowd enjoying the show as a slew of DJ acts such as Slander, Lea Luna, and Ultra Naté all took turns on the main stage. Later, drag queen Ginger Minj, best known from RuPaul’s Drag Race, performed; interacting with the crowd in a set that was a mixture of standup comedy and singing.

Finally, the EDM portion of the evening ended and Old School arrived as Grandmaster Melle Mel accompanied by DJ Prince Paul took over.  For the next thirty minutes, we were all raising our hands in the air and waving them like we just didn’t care- Oh yeah!  Melle Mel reminded us all of where Hip Hop and Rap began, performing the Grandmaster Flash and Furious Five version of White Lines, The Message and then leading the audience in a medley of some of the best known Old School rap.  Once his set finished, the DJ table was removed and it was time to move to the next portion of the evening.

While the stage was readied for Nile Rodgers and Chic, a youth dance troupe from Oakland, California, Destiny Arts, entertained the crowd with a high energy hip hop performance. This non-profit group combats inner city violence through programs in dance and martial arts.  Nile personally introduced them. In fact, throughout the night, Nile had been on stage, cheering on the various performers and even taking pictures. F.O.L.D. Festival was definitely a well-recorded event.  In addition to a cadre of professional photographers and videographers, a drone hovered above the crowd and a 360 degree camera captured every moment from every angle. In addition to heyjoe.nyc, also check out Jennifer Sheppard’s blog here.

Shortly before 8 pm, Nile Rodgers and Chic, currently comprised of singers Folami, Kim Davis, and musicians Ralph Rolle on drums, Jerry Barnes on bass, Bill Holloman on sax, Don Harris on trumpet, and Russell Graham and Richard Hilton on keyboards, began their set. Like many fans of Duran Duran, I consider Nile to be an icon.  Aside from the actual members of Duran, there is no one else more responsible for their sound, first as an influence when they were teens in Birmingham listening to Chic, then later as a mentor, producer and co-writer on everything from The Reflex, Wild Boys, Notorious, Astronaut and right up to their new single, Pressure Off. Nile had injured his knee the previous night so he apologized for not being able to dance around the stage and for wearing a tee and jeans with his signature beret, instead of his customary suit. Regardless, getting to finally see Nile Rodgers playing his signature Stratocaster, the Hitmaker, live with Chic was incredible. Tight doesn’t even begin to describe them- their sound, their look, their moves are all well practiced and well executed.  Everyone is in black and white with the singers, Folami and Kim Davis in matching print jumpsuits that recall the glamour of disco fashions.  Launching into Dance, Dance, Dance, the band wowed the crowd as they played hit after hit, not only from Chic but other songs Nile has written such as Diana Ross’s I’m Coming Out and Upside Down and Daft Punk’s Get Lucky. Nile teased us you’re all about to go crazy as he began playing Let’s Dance, which he wrote for one of Duran Duran’s other major influences, David Bowie.

Nile next introduced Janelle Monae, referring to her as his little sister while praising her talent and hard work.  If you’re not familiar with Monae, watch a few videos of her live performances and you’ll understand why she has earned such high acclaim from Nile Rodgers.  Also dressed in black and white, the diminutive Monae, who will be thirty this year, could easily pass for someone half her age.  However, she’s a powerful, dynamic performer, singing and dancing with intensity and skill. Performing with Chic as her backing band, along with her own charismatic guitarist, Kellindo Parker, Janelle Monae gave her all as she ran through her 4 song set, which included Q.U.E.E.N, Electric Lady, a cover of  James Brown’s I Feel Good, complete with the requisite cape, and finished with Tightrope.

As with Janelle Monae, Chaka Khan used Chic as her backing band and supplemented with her own guitarist.  Dressed all in black, she looked ageless with her trademark hair and beautiful smile as she sang four songs: I Feel for You, Sweetest Thing, I’m Every Woman, and Ain’t Nobody.  Unfortunately, Melle Mel had to leave right after his set so he wasn’t there to perform his “Let me love you Chaka Khan” rap during I Feel for You. Duran fans were also well aware that this meant he wouldn’t be there for a possible guest appearance with Duran Duran during White Lines.

After Chaka Khan finished her set, the Destiny Arts dancers and a number of family and friends joined the band on stage. After a moving speech by Nile about his aggressive cancer diagnosis and ultimate recovery, Chic played a rousing finale of Good Times. Nile even rapped part of the Sugar Hill Gang’s Rappers’ Delight, which famously sampled Good Times, bringing it all full circle and again emphasizing Nile’s influence on artists across many genres of music.  Throughout the night, you could really sense the camaraderie not only between Nile Rodgers and the other performers but the crew and staff as well.  Everyone working the show seemed truly happy to be there.

Once Good Times finished, the stage cleared and the DJ table was brought back for Chuck D. from Public Enemy.  Chuck D was originally scheduled to perform on the first night but couldn’t make it due to scheduling conflicts.  He began his set by telling us we had “twenty nine minutes to Duran Duran.”   With Nile again staying on stage and lending his support, Chuck D, backed by another Public Enemy founding member, DJ Keith Shocklee, led the crowd through some of the rap group’s biggest hits including Fight the Power as well as songs from their just released album, Man Plans God Laughs.  Chuck D rapped almost non-stop during his set, only stopping to tell the crowd how many more minutes to Duran Duran or to express his respect and admiration for Nile. As promised, he finished his set in just under thirty minutes and it was time for Duran Duran to perform.

Nile once again introduced the band, recalling how they met back in the early 80’s, and their long association with each other. Simon called the introduction the best they’d ever had before launching into an energetic performance of Wild Boys. The band looked and sounded fantastic. Simon, looking slim in white jeans and a black and white leather jacket, launched right into A View to a Kill as Nile Rodgers stood on the side of the stage clearly enjoying the set as the crowd, now at an estimated twenty-five hundred, sang along.

The next song on the roster was Girl Panic, which cause a minor panic of its own because up until this point, we had expected nothing more than the same five song set as all the other performers had given, especially with the time constraint of an 11 pm curfew. Therefore, we expected the Nile songs- Wild Boys, AVTAK, Notorious, Pressure Off, and The Reflex.  Girl Panic was quickly followed by All You Need Is Now and then Come Undone. We were getting a full set. F.O.L.D. Festival was suddenly even a better decision.

Following the AYNIN selections, the band rolled out three fan favorites, Is There Something I Should Know and The Chauffeur and Ordinary World.  It’s been exactly three years since the AYNIN tour ended abruptly with Nick’s illness in August, 2012 so it was fantastic to once again hear these live. The crowd, which wasn’t as familiar with the newer songs, was also thrilled to be back in familiar territory.

After OW, Nile walked back onto center stage as Simon announced “There’s one reason-one really big reason why we’re standing in front of you guys tonight…. And his name is Nile Rodgers.” Simon went on to describe the band’s reaction when they first heard The Original Sin by INXS, which was also produced by Nile Rodgers. They sent The Reflex to Nile and we know the rest. Simon finished by telling Nile “I love you, you are my brother” and hugged him, while every Duranie in the house raced to capture this Kodak moment.  They then launched into the song Simon describes as the complete “intertwangling of Nile Rodgers and Duran Duran”:  Notorious.  Nile went right over to JT and fans were treated to Nile and John playing together as Simon led the crowd.

Simon reintroduced Janelle Monae, describing her as a firecracker, as she returned to the stage and it was time for the premiere of Pressure Off.  The chemistry between them was fantastic.  Janelle’s high energy invigorated everyone and even Nile’s injured knee couldn’t stop him from dancing along as they played.

After once again thanking Nile and Janelle, the band continued playing, pushing well past the curfew as they played set list staples Planet Earth, HLTW, and Sunrise.  Finally, they said good night but were soon back on stage for their signature closing song, Rio.  Hearing it is always bittersweet since we know this is really the end.  The band thanked the crowd and the first F.O.L.D. Festival was officially in the history books.   Interestingly, the song many most associate with the relationship between Nile and Duran Duran, The Reflex, wasn’t on the set list.   I thought this was an odd decision since the song has so much history.  Also, the band once again didn’t play GOF and there were no band intros.  They skipped the intro again the next night at Musikfest and I’m told it was also skipped at the Capitol Theater shows.   It’s hard to imagine that they won’t add the intros back in for the main Paper Gods tour when it begins unless they’re looking to purposefully change their show ending.

Overall it was fantastic to finally be back in my favorite place on Planet Earth, front row at a Duran Duran concert.  My expectations for F.O.L.D. Festival were more than exceeded.  Nile Rodgers has already committed to bringing the festival back to Riverhead next year as a three day long weekend event, promising to bring back many of the acts that performed this time and grow the festival so that it’s one of the premiere destination events like Coachella.   Only time will tell, but if anyone can do it, it’s Nile Rodgers.

Set list:

Wild Boys
A View To A Kill
Girl Panic
All You Need Is Now
Come Undone
Is There Something I Should Know?
The Chauffeur
Ordinary World
Notorious
Pressure Off
Planet Earth
Hungry Like The Wolf
Reach Up For The Sunrise


Encore:
Rio

Book Club: Mad World (INXS, Thompson Twins and Simple Minds)

It is Book Club Monday!  There are only 2 weeks left of our latest book and book club.  As we hope you know, we have been reading and discussing the book, Mad World:  An Oral History of New Wave Artists and Songs that Defined the 1980s.  This week we are focused on the chapters on INXS, Thompson Twins and Simple Minds.  Join us with your thoughts on these chapters!

INXS

Amanda:

Before I started reading this chapter, I wondered if the focus was going to be Michael’s death or how the band has attempted to keep going without him.  I wouldn’t have criticized that, if that had been the focus.  After all, Michael was such a talent, a larger-than-life person.  Yet, I knew that the loss of Michael would be felt, would be acknowledged (as it should) through the music, according to the last couple of lines of author’s, Lori Majewski’s introduction about interviewing remaining members of the band, “…I could tell that they were still dealing with the loss 16 years later.  But they weren’t melancholy conversations, because we were talking about the part of Hutchence that will never die:  his songs.”  Truly, I think this is all any artist can hope for–that one’s art, no matter the medium, lives on.

Like Rhonda mentions in her section, I, too, wasn’t surprised that Original Sin was produced by Nile Rodgers.  Much like Duran, they were clearly fans of his and knew that working with him meant that they had were in the current music scene.  I suspect artists today still feel the exact same way.  Of course, they were such fans that they were nervous about working with him.  I can understand that.  Nile saw that and knew that he was going to have to deal with that.  I love that he did by having the rehearsal of Original Sin be secretly recorded and going with that.  Of course, the song created some controversy with the interracial lyrics.  It saddens me that lyrics about an interracial couple would cause anyone to be upset, but I’m not surprised by this, especially in the States during that time.  This reminds me about how the record label of Duran’s didn’t like Nile’s mix of The Reflex as they felt it sounded “too black”.  Clearly, racism was alive and well then.

One thing I always like about reading these chapters is how I learn something new about the artists behind the music.  I was fascinated with the statement about how Michael felt that he could talk to people through his lyrics.  He didn’t need to talk much and let his lyrics speak for him.  On one hand, I love the idea that one’s writing, one’s art truly does show what someone thinks and feels.  On the other hand, I know how easily one’s lyrics can be interpreted in multiple ways.  Wasn’t he worried that there would be misunderstanding?  That said, I guess all forms of communication can be misinterpreted. No matter how his lyrics are interpreted, I, for one, are thankful they were written and made available for all of us to enjoy.  Truly, his voice and words live on.

Rhonda:

You know what I would love? I would love for the first thought to come to mind when talking about INXS NOT be that Michael Hutchence is no longer with us. But it is, and as much as I try to fight that – I simply can’t. 

Some say that Michael Hutchence was sex, personified. I probably wouldn’t disagree. Lori Majewski mentions that his death was the first time she’d lost one of her idols. Again, I wouldn’t argue one bit and there are times when even now, I sit back and think “Wow, did that really happen?” That’s real grief, and it’s unavoidable. She says that in interviewing Andrew and Tim Farriss for this chapter she could tell that they were still dealing with his death. I have no doubt. Grief changes in feeling, but it’s still grief.  Jonathan says, “I listen to ‘Devil Inside’, ‘What You Need’, and ‘Never Tear Us Apart’, and I think ‘Boy, could we use a band like that today.’” AMEN.

It was never a surprise to learn that Nile Rodgers had produced Original Sin. One cannot help but hear his influence…and let’s face it…he also worked with Duran Duran (notably after INXS). It’s no wonder the band wanted to work with him – he is a genius.  Tim Farriss notes, “We were the first young white band to use Nile. I remember seeing John Taylor, and he was saying how much [Duran Duran] would love to work with him. ‘You used Nile Rodgers, eh? How is he?’ I was like, ‘Awesome man, but I don’t think he likes bass players.’ I was trying to turn him off to the idea. Sure enough, they ended up using him. That trick didn’t work.”  I laugh.  

What IS surprising, however, is Original Sin was a one-take record. Nile realized the band was in awe of him, so he had them rehearse it – while he had the sound engineer record the entire thing. That’s the way to get ‘er done, Nile. (I know a band that could use some of that again….*coughs*)

More “surprises”…the song was banned in the US, and I’m sure it’s because as Andrew Farriss described, it was the elephant in the room (and still is).  It’s so silly when you think about it now, but back then?  That was a huge deal. Yes, America is still far behind the rest of the world. To my parents – you just didn’t see that sort of thing in their generation much. Just to let you all in on a piece of my own history: it was a HUGE deal when I dated a Mexican kid in high school. You can’t even imagine. I mean, I’m Italian for crying out loud (my dad was kicked out of places when he was growing up because he was Italian and lived in New Jersey – where that lineage was frowned upon!) – and my boyfriend at the time was half Mexican/half white-as-me, but I practically had to get permission from the Pope before my parents gave me the OK. Ridiculous. My kids don’t even blink when they see people together, which is the way I want it. Things change. We’ve still got a long way to go, but from my point of view, it’s getting better. Slowly.

It seems like the only other thing to touch on is life after Michael. I have a continued difficult time with that – and I’m not even one of their biggest fans. I’m just a fan who loves their music, and I miss them. I’ve had fleeting affairs with some of their lead singers, but none touch the heartstrings of Michael – and I’m not really sure I’d want it any other way. I wish the band would tour again on one hand, and on another I’m not sure it was ever the same…but then, I never expected it to be. I just wish them well.

Thompson Twins

Amanda:

This is going to sound weird but my most vivid memory of this band and this song was when I was stereo buying.  My first CD player happened as a result of my 8th grade graduation.  It didn’t last.  By sophomore year in high school, I was back to buying a stereo.  I couldn’t live without my music!  How did I decide which stereo to buy?  I decided by listening to this song played loudly in the store on various stereos!  While I always liked this song, there was something about hearing it played in such a way that I appreciated it in a much bigger way afterwards.

Two aspects of the Thompson Twins story really caught my attention.  First, there was the couple aspect between Tom Bailey and Alannah Currie.  Second, there was their very clear decision to be “pop stars”.  Both seemed to affect not only the life of the band but also their decision not to reform as Thompson Twins.

Again, like Rhonda below, I had no idea that Tom Bailey and Alannah Currie were together, eventually married (and divorced) and had children together.  I’m not ever really surprised when I read about how two people from a  band were romantically linked.  I think that can happen whenever people work very closely together.  What I find more interesting is what it was like for the third member, Joe Leeway.  Was he worried about how their relationship would affect the band?  What if they broke up?  Would they want to become a duo?  Clearly, they managed to navigate this but I still wonder what affect it had.  Now, of course, Tom and Alannah are divorced.  Would they be more interested in reforming, if they were still married?  Who knows.

Lastly, I found it very interesting that they made a clear distinction about being pop stars instead of trying to be pop stars.  They went this way in order to treat it like a serious job and as a means to achieve their goals.  I think things like how you refer to yourself definitely does affect how confident you are, which impacts everything else.  Yet, now that they have different careers, does the title hold them back from reforming?  They can’t reform because they aren’t pop stars anymore?  Again, who knows.

Rhonda: 

My name is Rhonda Rivera and I am a fan of Hold Me Now. Any hope of being “hardcore” (as my 17-year old daughter Heather says) is finished now, I suppose.  Damn. I loved that song the entire way through school, and I still love it today. I miss the band, having bought all of their albums and continuing to treasure them today.

As nieve as I was, I had no idea that Tom Bailey and Alannah Currie were a couple. This explains the song so much, and yet I understand why they kept it private. I had a friend who was in a rock band that was becoming well-known and somewhere early into the journey he told me that he was taking a stage name. I didn’t get it at the time, but now I understand. For him, he was trying to keep the stage life separate from the real life. I don’t know how successful he was (we lost touch), but I can understand the need to compartmentalize. 

One thing I truly loved about the Thompson Twins was the audible  influence of world music.  I think of “You Take Me Up” or  “The Gap” and you can’t help but hear the African influence, and it’s done well.  The other thing I loved about the Thompson Twins was something I didn’t even realize until I read this book – and that was Nile Rodgers.  It isn’t lost on me that among the bands I cared about most during the 80s – Nile seems to be a common denominator. (Not bad for someone who never thought she was a disco fan!) 

It’s curious to me that during the writing of the book, Tom Bailey says that he isn’t interested in touring as Thompson Twins, which I really can’t blame him given that he and Alannah Currie are divorced.  But not long after reading, I saw that he is actually touring with Howard Jones, Midge Ure and others.  Good for him. 

Simple Minds

Amanda:

Seriously, this is one of those songs that I have to wonder if there is anyone of my generation who doesn’t love it.  Much like the movie in which it featured in the soundtrack, it represents that time for so many.  Everyone knows it.  Everyone loves it.

When I read this chapter, I realized how lucky we all were that it got made.  Clearly, the band wasn’t super comfortable to do someone else’s song.  (Isn’t that a sign of the times, too?  Nowadays, I assume that any popular, radio-friendly song is written by someone OTHER than the artist/singer/band performing it.  Then, though, I thought everyone wrote their own songs.  I believe that all the songs written in this book, up until this point, were written by the singers/bands themselves, just to prove a point.)  Yet, they decided to “smell the coffee” as they phrased it and went with it.  I like how they worked to make it their own, though.  I suspect is something not done much today as performers just go with what has been given to them for whatever reason.

Throughout this book, there have been a number of themes to emerge.  This chapter brings out two of them:  how bands dealt with their apparent (but not really) one hit and how this time period was filled with such creativity.  I have to say that I truly appreciated how Jim Kerr viewed both.  While he knows that he had many, many other quality songs beyond this one, he knows that this is the one that has lived on.  He understands that the song now belongs to everyone.  It is that HUGE.  He also understands the connection to a movie that also connected for so many.  There is no bitterness or anger there.  I only sensed acceptance.  Likewise, I appreciated his attitude when discussing the creativity of this musical era.  He talked about how bands all hung out together and would acknowledge chart success.  Competition did not seem to be fierce, but part of that seemed to be because each group was so unique.  No one had to worry about the other.  There was “no collective sound” but an “imagination”.  I miss that.

Rhonda:

Another “most favorite”.  I think I might be better off naming the bands that are NOT on that list – it would be far shorter! When I think of this band, I can’t help but think of “Alive and Kicking” and “Don’t You Forget About Me” first…but bringing up the rear is “Someone Somewhere in Summertime”.  I got a massive sunburn while listening to the entire album (New Gold Dream) one year while camping in San Diego, but I still love the song. 

I never realized the song wasn’t theirs, and that’s on me. I just assumed…which I’m finding in this industry is a huge “joke is on you” type of error to make. I will say that Jim totally makes it Simple Minds own with his vocals and his “Hey hey hey HEY” at the beginning, and I’m glad that they consider it a pleasure to play. So many times it ends up being the thorn in the side of what was a great career, but they seem to have embraced the fact that the song really broke through the American Ceiling for them. I think what bothers me about the band is that they’ve still got a lot of great music going for them that never gets heard over here, and as a result they rarely tour here, which really bums me out as a fan – but I get it.  

Once again I find something poignant to end my portion of the discussion, this time from Jim Kerr himself – about the 80s, “There wasn’t a collective sound like there was a sound of the sixties, but there was an amazing imagination. That was a very potent collection of kids – and we were kids at the time – and I still listen to a lot of that music to this day. (299) 

I couldn’t say it better.

It’s nearly the end!!  Next week we end our chapter-by-chapter discussion of Mad World by discussing what is likely the most shocking and shameful chapter in the entire book – “Obsession” by Animotion. Then we turn that emotion on it’s head by talking about the most beloved holiday song for nearly any Duranie/New Wave fan: “Do They Know It’s Christmas”, by Band Aid…and then just maybe we’ll do a wrap up of what we’ve learned along the way.  Please feel free to join in!!

-A & R