Tag Archives: Seven and the Ragged Tiger

Ways to survive until Paper Gods: 11 days and counting!

Eleven days to go!

Now that we’re down to mere days before Paper Gods drops and we celebrate, I can’t believe we’re finally here. (Just imagine how the band must feel!) There were moments during the past three years that I would secretly (or not so) share my worries with Amanda.  “Do you really think they’re ever going to finish this album?”  or “What if they never say anything and just fade away forever?”  While it seemed like the recording might never be completed, that was nothing compared to the virtual “radio silence” we were getting on social media. After a period of time when it seemed as though the band actually wanted to connect with fans, we were left with almost nothing.

Unfortunately, that seems to be an ongoing issue with no end in sight. Sad for those of us who enjoyed seeing them…but for the band, perhaps it’s a necessity for sanity. As someone who has occasionally seen the less-behaved side of fandom, I can understand even if I don’t always like it. The point being, we were starved on many fronts, and after feeling like we’ve been crawling through the Sahara desert for many, many, months….we’re near relief!

Amanda and I have been trying to celebrate these last several days by creating a sort of calendar of “tasks” for each day. If you’ve been following along, we suggested listening to a Duran album per day, starting with the first album, moving on to Rio yesterday, which would mean Seven and the Ragged Tiger today.  Perhaps you can listen while you complete today’s task – adding your own personal countdown clock to the release of Paper Gods to social media!  

This can be as simple as copying and pasting the little countdown post that the band has been doing on Facebook, doing something like I did for Daily Duranie (it’s in our left-hand side bar, and if you click it, you’ll be sent to the Duran Duran store to preorder your own copy of Paper Gods!), or even doing your own. The one I created for this site was done through a “plug-in” for WordPress (another word for app, really), and while I would love to make it all fancy with the Paper Gods coloring and design – I am no web designer. So, we’re sticking with the basics.

I encourage everyone to get in on the act – create your own countdown clock and post it! If you make one that you’d like to show off, feel free to post it to our Daily Duranie Facebook page (if you haven’t already liked our page – check out the link in the sidebar and LIKE us!) There are even apps right in Facebook that let you make one, or you can create your own online and have fun with it!  Let your Duran Duran flag fly!

Here are a couple of websites for countdown clocks:

time and date

Powr

web countdown

Or just run a search for “customizable countdown clock” like I did.

I’m off to go give a listen to Seven and the Ragged Tiger…

Eleven short days, my friends.  Eleven days!

-R

 

Duran Duran Albums A-Z

Daily Duranie welcomes new opinions and we wish to give all fans a voice. Today we feature a brand new guest blogger to Daily Duranie.  Enjoy!!

By Jason Lent

Understanding the impact of Duran Duran is near impossible if you did not experience it firsthand. They were pioneers of the New Romantic movement (which pulled its artistic aspirations from the likes of David Bowie and Roxy Music) and almost singlehandedly turned the music video into art. As a young kid discovering music, it was hard not to be lured into a world of exotic locations and mostly naked models set to exciting synth pop music.

Over the last thirty years, I’ve taken my share of jokes for sticking by Duran Duran through their musical highs and lows and I understand that the band will always be divisive amongst serious music fans. However, there is more depth and substance to their career than the majority of what passes for popular music in 2014. With that in mind, I dusted off every studio Duran Duran album they’ve recorded and ranked them from the most essential to the, um, best forgotten. I decided to skip the live album Arena (it’s a pleasant reminder of an epic tour but offers little to listeners) and the covers album Thank You which was disappointing but not quite as bad as most remember.

Rio (1982)

The point at which New Romantic music crossed into the mainstream and simultaneously established the fledgling MTV as a creative outlet that would shape the future of music. The impact of videos such as “Rio” and “Hungry Like The Wolf” are so culturally significant that the music gets slightly overlooked, which is criminal. As a band, Duran Duran hit on all cylinders throughout the record with John Taylor’s exquisite bass lines serving as the glue that holds the synths and electric guitar together to form one of the finest records of the decade. The album artwork also captured the decade perfectly adding to the overall aesthetic of a young band rising to the top of the world to define a generation. Quite simply, there are no weak songs on Rio making it the band’s preeminent album. At the time, “Hold Back the Rain” was just a kick-ass pop-rock tune but it takes on more meaning now knowing it was Simon’s plea to John to get control of his substance abuse, something that wouldn’t happen for another decade. The ballad “Save A Prayer” will always be the band’s most delicate moment while “The Chauffeur” closes the album on an artistic road that kept the band’s pop success balanced with their more artistic interests. This Duran Duran album is essential to any music collection.

Duran Duran (1981)

The perfect example of the New Romantic movement in music, Duran Duran’s debut sounded fresh and exciting even before the artfully conceived videos took the band to larger audiences. While “Planet Earth” and “Girls On Film” remain some of the band’s most notable songs, the album has a whole captures the essence of Duran Duran. The second side of this Duran Duran album edged into darker, moodier territory that revealed a depth to the music that critics have often overlooked. The opening two minutes of “Night Boat” strike a sinister mood while “Friends Of Mine” and “Careless Memories” are spirited punk songs filtered through the New Romantic prism. When released as the second single, “Careless Memories” faired poorly and the accompanying video remains one of the few misfires in the band’s catalogue. Listening now, that song was far from disappointing and, like the rest of the record, has aged quite well. When the album was re-released in 1983, the hit single “Is There Something I Should Know?” replaced “To The Shore” which made sense for the band and record company though it doesn’t fit the flow of the album.

All You Need Is Now (2010)

How do you make a Duran Duran album that almost matches the greatness of the band’s early work? You dust off the old instruments and allow the talented Mark Ronson to guide the recording process. From the title single on, the band recreates the magic of their first three records while updating it for 2010. The hook of “All You Need Is Now” recalls the sway of “New Moon Monday” and there are plenty of other sonic touchstones that harken back to the biggest days of Duran. The opening synth of “The Man Who Stole The Leopard” recall the band’s instrumental track “Tel Aviv” from their debut album while the opening drums of “Girl Panic” are “Girls On Film” redux. Who gives a shit?! It’s shimmering pop-rock beauty that the band once did better than anyone on planet earth.

Notorious (1986)

Three years is a long time in music. For Duran Duran, it meant one live album (Arena), a troubled live performance at Live Aid, and a breakdown in the line-up. “Who gives a damn for a flaky bandit” sang Simon Le Bon in the title track letting the world know how the remaining members viewed departed guitarist Andy Taylor. The album was a departure for the band as the age gap between them and their fans was suddenly felt in the music. For a thirteen year old, Nile Rodgers was just a name the band occasionally dropped as an influence. With little understanding of Chic and the other bands that shaped the band’s style, Notorious felt like a sudden shift away from the new wave glory of MTV that they did better than others. Over time, this Duran Duran album has matured well and reveals a talented group of musicians finding space to write smarter songs. The title track and “Skin Trade” are two of their tightest singles and the feisty “Meet El Presidente” finds a new groove for the Duran sound. The album’s strength lies in the quality of the songs throughout. “Vertigo (Do The Demolition)” and “American Science” are stylish pop tracks that hold their own with the singles. Closer “Proposition” (placed at the opposite end from the title track that takes a dig at him) gives us a final taste of the band with Andy Taylor (at least for a few decades) and it’s clear that the band’s sound needs his razor edge on guitar to compliment the synth explorations of Nick Rhodes. An album that has held up very well in the Duran Duran story.

Big Thing (1988)

To this day, I’m not sure why this Duran Duran album was such a disconnect for audiences. The singles didn’t make a lasting impact on the charts and the tour (at least at the Miami Arena, my first concert, finally!) played to less than full venues. After Notorious, I thought this was a bold step forward as the band pushed the music into new territory. “All She Wants Is” incorporates house music into the Duran sound to create a hypnotic tone and the accompanying video was one of the last great reasons to watch MTV. One of the band’s best ballads to this day, “Do You Believe In Shame?” opens a second half of the album which slides away from the dance floor towards the art house. The razor-sharp guitar the closes out “Lake Shore Driving” is the sort of six string showcase Andy Taylor would have eaten up had he not become a disillusioned guitar hero and left for a disappointing solo career (yes, I own Thunder on vinyl and yes, I’m still disappointed).  Why the b-side “I Believe/All I Need To Know” failed to make Big Thing while the dreadful “Drug (It’s Just A State Of Mind)” secured a spot mystifies me. Swapping those tracks would move this further up my list.

Seven And the Ragged Tiger (1983)

A complicated album from inception to completion, Seven is a difficult album for me to view through a lens not colored by nostalgia. After the monumental Rio, the band could do know wrong in my eyes and this record held my fascination. The lead single “The Reflex” needed a snappy remix to really bring it alive (“Whyyy-y-y-y-y-y-y-y-y- -don’t you use it”) and the live video helped showcase a slightly disappointing hit single. “Union Of the Snake” remains my favorite moment on the album. Andy adds some excellent guitar to the synth melody, the kind of small touch that future records would often be missing. While all quite fine, the non-singles tend to run together in my brain. “I Take The Dice” and “Shadows On Your Side” are interchangeable Duran songs. Heavily produced and sometimes sounding like a challenge to write, the success of this Duran Duran album resided more on the band’s name at that point in music.

Duran Duran – The Wedding Album (1993)

I remember exactly where I was when I first heard “Ordinary World” on the radio. I was returning from my girlfriend’s house and passing over Dixie Highway in West Palm Beach, FL. I pulled over after crossing the railroad tracks knowing Duran Duran was about to return to the charts. The song sat perfectly on the radio and remains a classic pop song. However, it’s not one of the better Duran Duran songs. It could have been recorded by just about any pop rock band at the time and lacked the unique Duran alchemy. “Come Undone” felt more like a classic Duran single and sounds beautiful with a slippery bass line and sexy rhythm. Opener “Too Much Information” still holds up as one of their better rock songs though the line “a cola manufacturer is sponsoring the war” feels a little uncomfortable coming from a band that Coca Cola sponsored in the 1980’s.  The rest of this Duran Duran album falters and suffers from an indistinctive sameness. The disappointing Lou Reed cover (“Femme Fatale”) serves as a harbinger of the Thank You album that would follow. In the end, a stylish Duran Duran album with three excellent singles is hardly a disappointing trip.

Astronaut (2004)

With the dismal performance of Pop Trash and no record label, it was a widely held assumption that Duran Duran were finished. The reunion nobody saw coming became reality (I figured Roger Taylor had retired from music forever and Andy always seemed like a loose cannon who resented his role in the band). To their credit, the band went into the studio instead of just filling arenas with the same reunion tour for a few summers. Opening track “(Reach Up For) The Sunrise” is a powerful reminder that, at its core, the rhythm section of Roger and John Taylor anchors Duran Duran. A driving chorus with Andy’s guitar jostling with Nick’s synths is Duran at their best. On the whole, the album proves a successful reunion of the Fab Five. “Nice” sounds like an updated Duran Duran, which is better than the slightly misguided band of the late 1990’s. This Duran Duran album suffers on the production side with just too much happening at once. It gives the record a cluttered atmosphere that they would sort out on their most recent work. At the time, any Duran Duran album from the original line-up would have been welcome but this album has aged well and remains sneaky good.

Medazzaland (1997)

By 1997, Duran Duran had crumbled as the creative entity that launched so many memorable albums. After the hugely disappointing Thank You record, the band was down to Nick and Simon with guitarist Warren Cucurrullo. Nick and Warren were the creative force giving this and it’s follow-up, Pop Trash, a unique place within the Duran canon. “Out Of Mind” completed Simon’s trilogy for a lost friend (“Ordinary World” and “Do You Believe In Shame” were the others) and sounded like an extension of earlier albums. However, the rest of the music moves into electronic dance sounds that felt alien to where Duran Duran started as a live unit. On a whole, Cucurrullo’s contributions to Duran Duran are difficult to assess. A gifted guitarist, it feels like he pushed the band into creative areas they might have been best to not explore. With the release of him and Nick’s side project TV Mania in 2013, some of this experimentation does make a bit more sense but Medazzaland is lacking in memorable moments.

Pop Trash (2000)

Album opener “Someone Else Not Me” hints at a return to form for Duran Duran but it was the only song written by Simon Le Bon for the album and it shows. With Warren Cuccurullo and Nick Rhodes in creative control of the music, this Duran Duran album feels like more of Medazzaland with a few less highlights. “Last Day On Earth” (written but rejected for a Bond film) gives the album a little more muscle and overall, the album does have a little more guitar pop than the more electronic Medazzaland. The acoustic driven “Starting To Remember” shows promise and is one of the better songs written during this period for the band but ultimately gets lost in a record of uninspired songs. At the end of the road with the record label, this was the first album I didn’t immediately buy from Duran Duran and I assumed (again, like I did after Liberty) that Duran Duran were at their creative end.

Red Carpet Massacre (2007)

The momentum of Astronaut may have corrupted the direction of the band when they returned to the studio. The original five worked on an album titled Reportage, which eventually reached the record label only to be rejected until the band recorded an obvious lead single. In their search for that single, the band began working with Timbaland and Justin Timberlake minus Andy Taylor, who would not return. The result is a trend-chasing Duran Duran album of club music that simply doesn’t work. The drums are heavily processed and the band’s more rocking edges are smoothed over until they are gone. Without hearing Reportage, it’s still safe to say the band would have fared better with their original plans. For a Duran Duran album trying to be dark and sexy, the album sounds embarrassingly bland.

Liberty (1990)

After Big Thing, I had high hopes for the slimmed down version of Duran Duran to remain relevant in popular music. Liberty seriously hampered my belief. For the first time, it sounded like the band was chasing trends and losing touch with who they were. Declining sales and success can do that to a band’s confidence. For the most part, this Duran Duran album attempts to capture the adult pop market in 1990, which was the least interesting direction the band could have pursued. The label eventually cut and run on the album’s poor sales and the album’s best track (“First Impressions”) never reached audiences. Even if it had, there’s not enough of Duran Duran in this album to ignite much interest. John Taylor, to this day under appreciated as a bass player, never found his groove with Sterling Campbell. It’s not a knock on Campbell, rhythm sections either click or they don’t. Without that, the band could not achieve the foundation for greatness that they had on earlier records. At the time, I remember thinking this was the end of the road for Duran Duran.

Jason Lent Guest Blogger thumbnailJason Lent discovered Duran Duran on MTV 1983 and a lifelong musical love affair was born. In 2010, he left a job in Hawaii to tour with Cowboy Junkies as a music writer and his work has appeared in various online music outlets. He currently resides in Las Vegas managing a music venue while trying to learn John Taylor’s bass line from Rio.

The Reflex: Honest and Uncut

By Richard Bendell

Like so many other big and long-time fans of Duran Duran, I was initially drawn in by the band’s great music from the very first time I got to ‘hear’ songs, which were from the album RIO, and shortly after when we then got the chance to ‘experience’ their songs through their ground-breaking videos.  Of course, it wasn’t long after that when I also became impressed by their personalities, creativity, unique presence and great energy.  But, really it was and has always been all about their music first and foremost for me.

And, through all the ups, and even the downs I’ve followed, believed and supported them for over 3 decades now since 1982, and still do.  There were some tough years after the band splintered down to three in 1986.  But, redemption came with The Wedding Album and they’ve rebuilt and proven themselves many times over that they are not only just a great band from the 80’s, but a great band, period!

Now, we know and have learned so much about Duran over the years that it’s a bit hard to imagine there might be anything much new that we might still discover.  And, it would seem even less likely that it would be something that would literally take us right back to the glory years of the band as they were working fervently on their third album with the unmistakable title of Seven and the Ragged Tiger.

Well, 2015 is here and we’re all getting back into the regular swing of things. Here is a link to a little New Year treat from ten and a half years ago in July 2004, (seems hard to believe), that drops us right beside Ian Little, and our favourite band back in 1983.

Despite having the same first name as the writer of the article, Richard Buskin, I have no connection with the Sound on Sound article CLASSIC TRACKS: ‘The Reflex’ at all other than luckily stumbling across it yesterday afternoon on December 20th.

Simply put, it is the best, most in-depth and honest article I’ve ever read about the band, the good, the great and not-always-so-great moments.  It is truly a refreshingly honest and detailed look focused primarily at the intricacies of making of the album, and a sense of what it was like for Ian Little and the Fab 5 at that magical point in time.

It’s not quite the same of course as the Classic Albums DVD of Rio, beyond the fact it is a printed article, as funny enough the band isn’t quite center stage, or not always even its central focus.  Rather, it brings us readers closer than ever before into the whole process of what it was like to make 7ATRT, sharing what happened before and during the recording sessions, with a stream of wonderful insights and all the ebbs and flows in between along with a dramatic dash to the finish line.  In fact, Ian Little was arguably the sixth member of the band for that album, so perhaps it could even have been called Eight and the Ragged Tiger.

Regardless of whether 7ATRT is on your top list of favourite Duran Duran albums or not, this article is literally ‘a treasure that was lying in the dark.’

And, if you haven’t seen it before, I really hope you enjoy it reading it as much as I did!

(My sincere thanks to Amanda and Rhonda of the Daily Duranie for allowing me to present this guest blog and share this terrific story with everyone.)

Richard Bendell photoRichard J. Bendell is a long-time and devoted fan of Duran Duran, their music, their visuals, musical instincts, their longevity, pretty much everything! I’m an accountant by trade, but I’ve also self-published a book in 2012 about one of the most famous sporting events in history that was 10 years in the making called: 1972 – THE SUMMIT SERIES: Canada vs. USSR, Stats, Lies & Videotape, The UNTOLD Story of Hockey’s Series of the Century

Today in Duran History – Seven and the Ragged Tiger

On this date in 1983, Duran Duran’s third album, Seven and the Ragged Tiger, was released worldwide.  That’s right.  It means that today marks its 31st anniversary.  How about some fun facts on the album?
It is 37:36 minutes in length.
Last album written and recorded by the Fab Five until the reunion
Produced by Alex Sadkin, Duran Duran and Ian Little
Album was worked on in the south of France, Montserrat and Sydney
Featured three singles:  Union of the Snake, New Moon on Monday and The Reflex
Peaked at number 8 in the Billboard 200 chart of top albums in the US and spent 64 weeks on the chart
Went double platinum (2 million copies sold)
Now, why don’t you put it on for a spin?
-A

This Week in Duranland – October 27, 2014 to November 2, 2014

It is Sunday and time to summarize the past week in Duranland.  As always, I will pull together information from duranduran.com, duranduranmusic.com and Duran’s and the members’ various social media.

Simon’s Birthday
Monday was Simon’s birthday!  As always, he had a message for everyone in response to all of the birthday wishes.  Did you check it out?  Did you also check out his birthday playlist on Second Life?  What did you think of his choices?

Nick’s Frieze Collection
Like art?  We certainly do and were excited to see some photos from the collection that Nick curated for the Galerie 1900-2000 at Frieze Masters on duranduran.com.

Austin
I’m sure, by now, each and every one of you are aware that Duran played in Austin last night as part of the Formula1 Fan Fest.  Social networking sites have been plastered with pictures and videos of their performance.  What does this say to me?  It is really very, very simple.  We are dying for #duranlive.  If this is how the fan base, both in person and not in person, react to one show, imagine how it would be for a few shows, a mini-tour, or a full-blown tour?!  Anyway, from everything I have seen, the show was a success and the band sounded and looked fabulous!  Seriously, I could spend all day just looking at the pictures and watching the videos posted both by Duran Duran, by fans in attendance or by fans sharing what they have found online.

Here is the setlist that Duran Duran posted:
Austin setlist 14I was surprised to see Psycho Killer on the setlist.  While it is nothing unusual for Duran to throw in a brief cover, this is a new one.  I will be on the lookout for video of that one.  How well did Duran cover Talking Heads?  Did it blend well with Girls on Film?

Now, readers, I encourage you to post the best pictures and videos here! Let’s see the best that is out there!!!

Russell Mulcahy
I love to see Russell Mulcahy get the credit he deserves for being a fabulous music video director.  Billboard.com discussed how important he was to the medium this past week, which you can read here.

1984
Billboard was busy this week!  On top of discussing Russell Mulcahy, they also published the Top 10 Pop Albums of 1984.  Can you guess what made the list and where?!  Check it out!

WIRED Magazine
Nick will be in the December issue of WIRED magazine.  He will be discussing GENEU.  It should be an interesting read!

Rehearsal Pictures
Who doesn’t like to see pictures of Duran Duran rehearsing?  Who doesn’t like seeing new pictures of the band?  I think many fans get particularly excited about seeing pictures when the band has been away from the spotlight.  It reassures all of us that they are alive and well.  Plus, I’m sure that it worked to get everyone excited for that show in Austin!  Check out the latest in dd. com’s gallery!  While you are visiting, check out how the gallery is organized now.  I like the changes!

Alright, Duranies, what did I miss?!

-A

This Week in Duranland – October 20, 2014 to October 26, 2014

It is Sunday!  It is time to recap the week!  As always, please let me know if I missed anything!

“Lorde’s ‘Hunger Games’ Soundtrack featuring “Kingdom” with Simon Le Bon and Charli XCX
Lorde has curated the soundtrack for The Hunger Games:  Mockingjay, Pt. 1.  This soundtrack will feature none other than Duran’s very own Simon Le Bon.  Simon has teamed up with Charli XCX to do a song called “Kingdom”.  This soundtrack is due out on November 17th.  For all the details, check out the press release and this blog post.  You can also read an article on billboard.com.

October Collector’s Corner
This month on dd.com, the collector’s corner focuses on Simon and all of his different projects outside of Duran Duran.  If you are someone who is a big Simon fan or someone who wants to know the complete history of the band, I recommend checking it out here.

Live from London
Can you believe that it has been 9 years since Live from London was released?  I was very lucky to be able to go see this live concert in the movie theater, which I wrote about here.

Unstaged
Apparently, Unstaged is now available on DVD in Australia.  Has anyone in Australia purchased it?  I would love a review!

DJ Roger
Apparently, Roger did a little DJ gig at a charity event for the Duke of Edinburgh in London.  This organization focuses on young people from 14 to 24 to help them gain the necessary skills for work and life.  I would head to Duran’s Facebook page to see a picture of Roger at work!

Ask Katy
Have you checked out the Ask Katy questions on dd.com lately?  See what was asked about songs from Seven and the Ragged Tiger being played live and the band’s response here.

Making Patterns Rhyme: a tribute to Duran Duran
Did you see that the entire 22 track album is available for pre-order on iTunes?  It is available October 28th!

John Taylor Supporting Henley Recovery Cafe
John was in the news this week for supporting the recovery and peer support program of the Henley Recovery Cafe as he visited and shared his experiences in recovery.

Yasmin’s Birthday Surprise
Check out the band’s Facebook page to see a picture of Simon and Yasmin at Yasmin’s Surprise Birthday Party!  We wish her a happy one!

Next week should be a busy one with the release of the tribute album and Duran Duran in Austin!  Until then…

-A

Guest Blog: The Notorious Mr. Nile Rodgers

By PamG

As most of us in Duranland know, the band has recently worked with the legendary Nile Rodgers for the new album. This news really made me happy. I mean, really, really happy. Not only does it signal forward progress on the new album, but I’m also hoping it means he’s bringing back some funk on the long-awaited album. And since reading his memoir Le Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Disco, and Destiny, I am even more interested in what happens next.

As a child of the ‘80s, I had mostly known Nile as that guy who did the awesome remix for The Reflex and performed with Madonna during Live Aid. Oh, and he had something to do with David Bowie’s Let’s Dance album too, since his name kept coming up during whenever Bowie was nominated for Grammy or VMA awards for it. Over the years, I came to realize that he played a very large role in the music that shaped my adolescence.

When I learned that he had penned his memoir, I knew I had to read it. I didn’t know much about the man, but I assumed he’d have a lot of tales of the 1980s music scene, and of course I was hoping for some new salacious tales about Duran. So if nothing else it might be a good source of gossip and backroom Studio 54 stories.

Little did I know how moved I would be by his life story. For this white girl who grew up in the suburbs, his background was nearly 180 degrees away from my middle-class experience. That wasn’t too surprising. And frankly those are the kinds of memoirs I enjoy reading. Sure, I expected there to be tales of drug use and abuse; that was a pretty safe bet with anyone who was in that music scene. And there was a rags-to-riches story too. But what hit me was how much Nile had survived before the tender age of ten: he was born to a teenage mother, witnessed rampant drug use in and around his home which was constantly on the move, and was sent to live in a convalescent home for his severe asthma. And this was only Chapter 2. This man was a survivor.

Don’t get me wrong: his brutally honest narrative is not a drab, sad tale. Even as he tells the tales of the ups and downs of his life so far, he does it with some humor too. And from the many interviews I’ve watched in recent years, it just seems that it’s part of his survival tactic. Mr. Rodgers’ memoir was published in 2011, not long after he was diagnosed with cancer. He addresses the diagnosis in his epilogue, but continues to publicly share his story on his blog “Walking on Planet C” (http://www.nilerodgers.com/blogs) and his Twitter account (https://twitter.com/nilerodgers). He recently shared that he is now cancer-free, and I wish him good health for many years to come.

Photo: Nile Rodgers Facebook page August 23, 2014
Photo: Nile Rodgers Facebook page August 23, 2014

Are there spicy tales about Duran in Le Freak? Yup. He speaks to some of his collaborations with them, both in and out of the studio. As expected, Nile also shares stories of other collaborations from the 1970s and 1980s, including Madonna, David Bowie, Donna Summer, Mick Jagger, and Michael Jackson, just to name a few. For a kid like me who grew up on MTV, this book is rich with tabloid-like tales that are like bedtime stories to me.

But in addition to the behind-the-scenes tales, I found myself drawn into the story of his musical collaboration and inspiring friendship with Bernard Edwards. When describing the first time they played together, Nile describes a musical telepathic connection. They follow their musical passions and form the band Chic. It didn’t take long for the disco world to become their oyster. But it’s Nile’s tale of their friendship—including when they drifted apart—that impacted me most. Reading the passage about their last moments together was both chilling and tear-jerking.

What will come of his collaboration with Duran on this next album? Time will only tell. But no matter what, I will be forever grateful for his remix of The Reflex. That record changed my life. Not only is it one of my favorite Duran songs, it was the first 12” record that I ever bought, and it opened my musical ears to the world of remixes. In the latter half of the 1980s I spent countless hours in record stores (remember those?). I still have vivid memories of heading straight to the “E” section of the store, backing up one row to the end of the “Ds”, and then filing through the Duran section for any 12” records that I hadn’t found before. Of all the vinyl I used to own, the Duran 12” singles are among the very small collection I have retained. It is rumored that The Reflex wasn’t even considered as a single off of Seven and The Ragged Tiger until Nile’s remix happened. On behalf of many Duranies, thank you Mr. Rodgers!

Photo: Duran Duran Facebook Page August 21, 2014
Photo: Duran Duran Facebook Page August 21, 2014

I recommend Nile Rodgers’ memoir for anyone who is interested in a story of how music can change the trajectory of a person’s life. Or if you want to read one man’s story of survival. Or even if you just want the behind-the-scenes stories of some of your favorite ‘80s darlings. And of course, it’s also for anyone (like me) who is still hungry for more Duran while we wait for #DD14.

 

PamGPamG has been a Duranie since the early days of MTV. In addition to all-things Duran, she also enjoys music documentaries, pop culture trivia, and live concerts of any kind. Her Duran dream would be to journey across the pond and see the band play throughout Europe. After waiting over 25 years to see Duran Duran live, she saw her first show in 2011 and it changed her life.