Tag Archives: side projects

Survey Analysis

Yesterday, I posted the results to some surveys I created regarding Duran fans and their collections of their albums as well as side/solo projects.  I promised to do a little analysis about what I thought about the results.  (You might realize that I like to do this sort of thing.  I tend to analyze a lot.  It is the social scientist in me, I guess.  Plus, I like to try to figure out the Duran fan community the best I can!)  If you want to read the full results, you can read the post here.

Duran Albums Owned:

In looking at the results, I figured that most people reading this would own Rio.  Heck, it is probably the most owned Duran Duran album out there as I am willing to bet that there are a lot of non-Duranies who own it.  Quickly following Rio was Seven and the Ragged Tiger, The Wedding Album, Self-Titled, Arena, and Paper Gods.  Again, both Seven and the Wedding Album included significant hits for the band, which means it is logical for those to be owned by many.  Paper Gods might be the only odd album in there except that it was the most recent one.  Rounding out the top of the albums owned list was Astronaut, All You Need Is Now, Notorious and Red Carpet Massacre.

After that, the number of fans who own Greatest, Big Thing and Decade dropped.  An even greater drop happened with the albums of Thank You, Liberty, Medazzaland and Pop Trash.  In fact, the least owned studio album was Pop Trash.  That does not surprise me in the least.  Actually, I am not surprised by the last 4 studio albums of Thank You, Liberty, Medazzaland and Pop Trash.  Why is that, though?  Are those albums hard to find or do fans not want to spend money to buy them?  What I found interesting, though, is that there are not many fans who own Live from London and A Diamond in the Mind.  This leads to another question.  Is it these fans don’t own the DVDs or that they bought the DVDs without the CD?  I’ll ask those questions in later surveys?

Duran Albums Heard Completely:

I have to admit that the results of this survey surprised me a bit.  While it wasn’t the order that make me think, I was just surprised that so many fans haven’t heard entire albums.  For example, there were a number of fans who participated who haven’t heard the whole Big Thing album or all of the Self-Titled debut.  While I can understand Big Thing, but the 1st album?  All of songs off of these albums are available on YouTube so cost isn’t the reason.  It isn’t that I’m judging.  I’m just trying to understand.  If you haven’t heard all of the Duran albums completely, can you please share why?  I would like to know.

Side/Solo Projects Owned Completely:

Again, I could have predicted the results to this one.  I knew more fans owned Arcadia and not many would own Roger’s Freebass.  The only one that sort of surprised me was that there were a lot less fans who owned Power Station in comparison to Arcadia.  Is that because of the second album of Power Station?  I could ask more questions to find out.  Again, though, I would like to know why fans own what they do, especially after seeing the results of the side/solo projects heard.

Side/Solo Projects Heard:

The results of the side/solo projects heard completely almost matches the side/solo projects owned.  Most fans have heard Arcadia completely.  Few fans have heard Freebass completely.  Yet, the list changes when you look at side/solo projects that people have heard some of.  In that case, more fans have heard some of Simon’s followed by Andy and John.  In that case, I can conclude that many Duranies have heard some of the individual songs by Simon, John, Andy, etc.  Would those fans want to hear more of the solo projects then?  Lastly, a lot of fans haven’t heard Freebass at all.  The same is true with Dom’s stuff and many of the side projects created in the 1990s and beyond.  Do people want to hear those projects?

Those are my thoughts about these surveys.  Every time I use surveys like this I learn something more about our fan community.  What did you think of the results?

-A

Today in Duran History – Arcadia Interview

On this date in 1985, Nick Rhodes and Simon Le Bon were on NRJ Radio in Paris, France.  Based on the date, I assume that they were working on the Arcadia project, which was probably featured quite heavily in the interview.

Was anyone lucky enough to have heard this interview?  Let’s watch a different interview from the same era.

-A

 

Today in Duran History – Power Station San Francisco

On this date in 1997, Power Station played at the Fillmore in San Francisco.  No, you did not read a typo.  Power Station did, indeed, tour in 1997.  Power Station reformed after their busy 1985, which saw the release of their 33 1/3 album with singles, Some Like It Hot, Get It On and Communication, and tour.  This Power Station version was a bit different, though.  While it started out with the original members of John, Andy, Tony Thompson and Robert Palmer, John, quickly, bowed out.  Bernard Edwards, producer of Power Station’s first album, and bassist for Chic, stepped in to play bass.  This version of Power Station did released an album, Living in Fear, in 1996.  Unfortunately, Bernard passed away before the tour started.  The tour continued with other bassists filling in.  Obviously, this version of Power Station did not have the same level of success as the 1985 one.

I wondered how this version was live.  Anyone there?  I would love to have people compare the two versions of Power Station.

No matter, let’s see a video of this version.

-A

Today in Duran History – Neurotic Outsiders

On this date in 1995, Neurotic Outsiders played together for the first time.  For those unfamiliar with Neurotic Outsiders, it was a side project of John Taylor.  John discusses the formation of the band in his autobiography.  He mentioned that he became close with Steve Jones of the Sex Pistols when Matt Sorum of Guns ‘n’ Roses called both of them to play at a fundraiser.  Matt brought Duff McKagan, also of Guns ‘n’ Roses, along.  After they played, the guy, who ran the Viper Room in Los Angeles where the fund raiser was held, asked them to do a residency by playing there every Monday.  They settled on the name, Neurotic Outsiders.  Initially, they played a bunch of cover songs and invited other musicians to join them.  Eventually, they took their show on the road.  Then, a label offered them a record deal and they chose to write new songs for it.

While I couldn’t find a video from this particular show, I could find a live clip of the band performing their song, “Jerk.”

Did anyone see Neurotic Outsiders perform live?  If so, what did you think???

-A