Tag Archives: social networking

Are we still a Networker Nation?

In yesterday’s blog post, I mentioned the power of social media. Although I don’t have Sirius XM radio, within moments of the interview John Taylor did with Richard Blade on Monday, I knew what had been discussed. I felt triumphant.

Say whatever you like about the evils of Twitter and Facebook. They can definitely be a cesspool of humanity. I agree that Twitter can seem like an echo chamber. I don’t believe that Twitter changes anyone’s mind, and I don’t think it is necessarily the best place to chat about politics. In all honesty, I stay off of it as much as possible anymore because it isn’t enjoyable. The population of people that once posted has changed.  I think even the very function of Twitter has changed since its inception.

However, if I need information quickly, Twitter is my failsafe. I can put a question out there, and get an accurate answer in an incredibly  impressive amount of time. Twitter is reactive, sometimes explosively so. Facebook seems to be more of a warm, fuzzy place…most of the time. It is where I connect with extended family, and it is where I have learned things about family members that I really didn’t ever need to know. It is also where I get good and bad news from childhood friends, and find out that my former high school crushes have gained several chins and collected wives along the way in the same spirit as I have Duran Duran ticket stubs. Even so, I don’t tend to loiter on social media as I once did.

I do miss sitting around and tweeting with friends. It was like a giant chat room, and no, we didn’t always agree. That didn’t matter, though. It was about the gathering, the communication, even the immediacy and yes, even the friendship. Something happened though, and for all of the good that could be found, Twitter turned angry. It isn’t very enjoyable much of the time. I don’t see many fans on Twitter these days, at least not that are there for the pure enjoyment of being a fan. I suppose we take our cues from the band to some extent, who themselves seem to have left social media – at least as recognizable people using their own names (Not that I know otherwise. I’m just saying that if they wanted to participate under a blanket of anonymity, they probably could.)  I can’t really lay blame in any one direction. Even so, when I need information, it does have its place.

I don’t think we can ignore the fact that within moments of news breaking, whether that is a devastating earthquake, or a tour being announced, it is being discussed on Twitter. The same holds true for Facebook, although the reaction time is longer. Social media has its place, but where do we go to really enjoy being fans without the trappings that “real” life on social media has to offer? Is it that we’re all just too busy now? It wasn’t that many years ago when the message board and/or forum of DDM was a bustling place. Post counts jumped by the dozens within seconds. Does anyone still talk about the band anywhere?

Oddly, we have a message board that is largely ignored, and I need to shoulder at least half of that responsibility. I find that I spend very little time “online” these days. It isn’t because I have that much less time, it is because the last thing I want to see or do is talk politics, or read about more horrors taking place within my country. I don’t need five hundred friends sharing the same comments, memes, and complaints. I’m sick of it.  Rest assured, I feel the same as many of you, although likely not with the same intensity as some. I’m just tired of talking about it all, or reading about it. So, I stay offline as much as possible. I can’t imagine I’m alone. I check out Instagram, I smile at pictures. I love cats and dogs. I need the good things more than I need to read the bad things five hundred times.

So while there is certainly power within social media, and our fingers flying across the keys does far more to “spread the word” than it used to, I have to wonder where the fun has really gone. Is it time to fire up the message boards again? Sometimes, I wonder. I miss our online fun.

-R

Social media: Facets on Diamonds in the Mind

First of all, have you done your Duranie homework yet?  I know, I know – the “homework” portion of Daily Duranie is typically handled by my more-than-capable cohort, but since I just over at our message boards, I decided to mention it. In order to participate, one must register for the boards – no “anonymous” participants (sorry!), but you can pick whatever screen name you’d like and join in the fun.

Speaking of our message boards, I’m really pleased with the small group that is beginning to call the board “home”. If you’ve been shy about joining, or are nervous to join due to preconceptions of what message boards have been like in the past, I encourage you to come and take a gander. The board is small, and it’s been very friendly thus far, which is something that will continue. We aren’t there to debate the blog, or really have hard conversations about much of anything – it’s really a safe place to find community. I really hope to see more of readers participate. The more active the board, the more time people will spend there.

Interestingly enough, Daily Duranie has a number of different social media you can find us on these days. Not only do we have the blog, but we have a Facebook page, a Twitter page, a presence on both Google + and Tumblr, a YouTube channel, and the message board. I’ve done some reading recently about social media and audiences – and I’m fascinated by the idea that some rather prominent figures out there believe that the same basic type of audience can be found across all avenues of social media. Amanda and I have had lengthy conversations about this ourselves, and we’ve found something quite different in our case.

Oddly, we can post a blog here and, depending upon the topic, we can get a variety of responses and they are definitely not all the same. For example (hypothetically speaking), where the response might be all positive on Facebook, Twitter could be otherwise.  Comments here on the blog itself are usually far, far different from the comments we get in other places – not better or worse, just completely different. The demographics we reach for each type of media are very different as well. Tumblr seems to be a bit younger. Google + is hard to tell, no one really sticks around there for long, although we do get comments from time to time. Twitter and Facebook seem diametrically opposed to one another most of the time – and what I mean by that is however people are commenting or feeling on one, it is the opposite on the other. That includes if we’re getting a ton of comments in one place, we’re not getting any in the other. We post some video blogs from time to time on YouTube, and our responses there seem to be from mostly males (although rest assured there are females too), and quite frankly they seem to be pretty tech-savvy to the music industry, which is great! And, our message board? It’s the warm-fuzzy place. There’s not a lot of talk about the blog, per se (which I for one appreciate!), and it’s the place where Duranies can come, fangirl or fanboy themselves out, and not be judged. I applaud that.

Sweeping generalizations aside, my point is that the audiences across the social media spectrum are not the same. Whats more, I’m learning no matter how many places we post, engage or reach, we’re still finding fans that are more than thankful to find the blog, find other fans, or find a place to chat about the band….and there isn’t a ton of overlap, meaning that our audience on Twitter is fairly unique. If you’re checking us out on Facebook, maybe you’re not that active on Twitter. Or, if you’re into YouTube, you might not love Tumblr, and so on. For someone like me, who stumbled into this whole social media thing and learns as I go, each day brings on a new learning curve, and I love it.

It’s fairly easy to form an incredibly myopic view in fandom if you’re sticking to one source of social media. Fandom has a sort of “mob-mentality” that goes along for the ride when someone decides to stick their neck out on one issue or another. It is easy to assume you’ve seen or know everything that has gone on, or that you know the entire story based on what you’ve seen on Twitter. Think again. Just because you’ve seen the tweets of two accounts means precious little, because maybe that conversation or topic has been discussed in a variety of different places with a vast array of responses and opinions. In our case alone, we write the blog here, but it also gets posted in about four different places online before the search engines even begin to have their way with it. We get responses to blogs EVERYWHERE…from our private email to YouTube and everything in-between. It’s pretty inciting to jump on the bandwagon when you see that “everyone” on one particular social media is responding in a similar way.

However, that’s really only one facet of the diamond, isn’t it?

-R