Daily Duranie Review

Tiger Tiger — The Daily Duranie Review (A)

Today, it is my turn to review a little instrumental called Tiger Tiger.  Rhonda did hers last week.  On one hand, I have to admit that I’m glad to be doing an instrumental as I won’t have to deal with two major components of vocals and lyrics.  It isn’t that I don’t love those elements of Duran’s music.  I do.  I’m just super tired as I type this!

Musicality/Instrumentation:  Wow.  We have often talked about how there are some Duran songs that start and you can’t really tell what it is and then there are others that you know instantly.  This song is definitely an instant one.  The opening notes are almost haunting, creating almost a spiritual feeling.  Now, in fairness, I’m sure that is partly what it has come to represent in my mind–that 1984 tour, Duran on top of the world, etc.  It reminds each and every one of us of watching that tour documentary, Sing Blue Silver.  Anyway, after hearing those first couple of notes, you are hooked whether that is from memories or not.  The beauty of these opening notes is truly how fitting, musically, they were with that opening title images of Sing Blue Silver.  The song is played with trucks loading equipment, doors opening and closing.  The music almost sounds like that.  You can hear the squeak of the door hinges and the door being shut or again it is just that those images have been so burned into my brain!   As the song continues, the additional keyboard notes in the beginning enhance that haunting sense.  It reminds me of Nightboat in that way.  All of this before the song really kicks in.  Of course, the majority of the song features not only Nick’s keyboards, John’s bass and Roger’s drums that Roger fans all love live as he typically stands up for, but the song also places saxophone, front and center.  What?!  The saxophone player isn’t even a full member!  Yet, I don’t think that anyone complained about Andy Hamilton’s role for this one.  The thing I always loved about this song is that how it just feels so peaceful, in a way.  It feels calm despite the changes from the eeriness and slowness of the beginning to the more up tempo middle and end.  It is almost like you are riding a wave.

Vocals:  No vocals.  I have to say that I can’t imagine this song having vocals, can you???

Lyrics:  Again, I can’t image lyrics!

Overall:  Perhaps, one of the reasons that this song doesn’t feel so overwhelming is that it doesn’t feel TOO full.  In many of the songs off Seven and the Ragged Tiger, it feels like there was effort to fill up every little bit of musical space with sound and often layers upon layers of sound.  Now, this song still has strong instrumentation but the music is just allowed to breathe.  It isn’t like one instrument takes the center stage and pushes the rest to the side like other songs on Seven and the Ragged Tiger can.  They all can coexist equally.  It is one song that I have truly grown to appreciate both for the memories it always brings up but also for the beauty of the song.

Cocktail Rating:  Four and a half cocktails!

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-A

One thought on “Tiger Tiger — The Daily Duranie Review (A)”

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