Tag Archives: Duran Duran The Wedding Album

Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Wedding Album: My Story

Duran Duran’s album, The Wedding Album, turns 25 years old today.      I always love to celebrate significant moments in the band’s history and this one is no exception.  Yesterday, I had the chance to commemorate the significant anniversary through videos, interviews, performances, etc.  Today, I prefer to think of my own relationship to this album.  I know that sounds weird that I would have a “relationship” with an album, but I feel like I do with each of Duran’s albums.  Each one has meant something a little different to me and I get to acknowledge it on dates like one.

The Wedding Album came out in the winter of 1993.  At that time, I was finishing up my high school career and getting ready to attend college.  February, in fact, marked my acceptance to Kalamazoo College through a personalized phone call.  The end of high school and the beginning of college is a huge transition for most people and I was no exception.  While college tends to represent the end of childhood, this time period felt more significant to me.  At that time, my siblings had moved away as my brother was in grad school in Iowa and my recently married sister was getting ready to move to North Carolina.  My dad was not living at home, either, as he was working in Georgia.  As I got ready to leave home, it wasn’t just the house I would be leaving.  It would be leaving my house, my town and even my state as my parents prepared to move at any time.

For me, this meant that I turned inward.  The rest of the world just happened around me with little attention given by me.  To say that I was self-absorbed would be an understatement.  What does this mean in terms of my fandom?  Pretty simple.  My Duran fandom was the furtherest thing from my mind.  I had no idea that Duran had even recently a new album.  My home town did not have radio that captured any music I cared for and I had stopped watching MTV as it moved towards reality television.  Therefore, I missed the fanfare surrounding the song, Ordinary World, for example.  Now, I wished I hadn’t but I did.

Thankfully, my friend was not as ignorant to the comings and goings of Duran Duran as I was.  Somehow, someway, she not only heard the album but had purchased a copy of it.  When she told me about it, I was still too self-absorbed to really let that news sink in.  In fact, it didn’t really register to me until she suggested that we go see Duran in concert.  That caught my attention.  As a kid, I desperately wanted to see Duran Duran in concert.  I would have sold a kidney if it could have convinced my parents to let me go.  When the band played the Chicago area in 1984, I was simply too young and my parents were not going to go with me.  No way.  Then, when they came back in 1987, I had moved further away from the city.  This would have required my parents to drive significantly for me to go.  Again, no way.  By 1989, I didn’t even try.  In 1993, though, I was finally old enough to go on my own.  Thus, when my friend suggested going, I jumped at the chance.  I figured it would fulfill my childhood dream.

Unfortunately, by the time we got tickets to the August 1993 show, the seats left were less than desirable.  We ended up about five rows from the very back all the way on the left hand side.  Still, I had a lot of excitement going in and begged my friend to play this new album on the way to the show.  As I listened, I wasn’t sure that it felt like the same Duran to me but I was willing to give it a try.  Even now, I distinctly remember my friend giving reviews of each and every track as we listened.  The album finished as we pulled up to the arena and I was determined to have fun.  Now, readers of this blog will know that as much fun as I had (and I had a ton!), it didn’t feel like I expected it to feel.  I’m not sure why.  The fact that it wasn’t the Fab Five?  Where I was in my life?  No clue.

After the show, I did, indeed, grab a copy of the album but didn’t really bond with it then.  I know for so many Duranies that this album took a hold of their hearts immediately but that was not the case for me.  No, it took time for me to bond with it.  Like many others, it took appreciating Ordinary World for me to connect with it.  Interestingly enough, it did not happen until after I had graduated from college.  In the fall of 1997, I moved to Madison, hoping to find a home since my childhood home ceased to exist in the traditional sense.  Like so many others after college, I had a lot of random jobs before my career got going.  One of those jobs included working in a shoe store, which played music all the time.  That fall, once again, featured a transition for me.  Instead of going from high school to college, it was about finally being an adult.  When I heard Ordinary World one day at the store, I finally got it.  I needed to find my new Ordinary World.

Interestingly enough, from that moment, I tried to pay more attention to Duran that I had in a long time.  In many ways, while the Wedding Album isn’t the album that made me a Duranie or the one that I love the most, it definitely helped keep me going through a huge transition in life.  It also really kept my fandom alive.

-A

Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Wedding Album: Videos

This past week, DDHQ announced that they would be celebrating the 25th anniversary of the release of Duran’s seventh studio album, affectionately known as the Wedding Album.  This has led to countless posts throughout the week featuring various songs and videos from that album and era.  Rhonda dove into the song, Ordinary World, earlier this week that you can read about here.  I will take the time tomorrow to share my thoughts and memories of this album and time period.  Until then, I thought it might be fun to put together some essential video clips from this era in all one place.

The Wedding Album featured a number of singles and videos.  According to their wikipedia page, the singles from this album included:

  • Ordinary World
  • Come Undone
  • Drowning Man (Really???  Who knew?)
  • None of the Above
  • Too Much Information
  • Femme Fatale
  • Breath After Breath

Luckily for Duran Duran fans, a number of those had videos to accompany them!

On top of these official videos, the band also completed a ton of various promotional activities from interviews to other performances.  I could have spent my entire Saturday just watching all of the different clips from this era as there is so much out there.  That said, I did take some time to just pick out some of the ones I have enjoyed the most.

One particular performance that really stood out for me was their appearance on MTV’s Unplugged.  I was not sure that the band could really become acoustic and it turns out I questioned this for no reason.

Here is an interview from MTV’s Most Wanted with John and Simon that I have always enjoyed:

This interview is a long one!  It is almost twenty minutes long and features Simon and Nick.  I especially enjoy the discussion of the artwork and how it came to be, since it features their parents’ wedding photos.

Larry King also interviewed Simon and Nick.  What fascinates me is that the introduction focuses on how critics “laughed at them”.  Oh geez…Larry King made for an interesting interviewer.

Jay Leno was a little more hip…with his interview for the Tonight Show.  I appreciate the fans’ enthusiasm throughout the interview but especially after the intro!

Of course, one clip that I had to include was the House of Style hosted by Cindy Crawford (who, of course, later appears in Girl Panic) as she takes Simon and Nick shopping at Sears.

Duran’s performances from this era weren’t too bad either…Here is a personal favorite of mine.  See if you can guess why!

Here’s a full concert from Argentina in 1993:

I don’t know about the rest of you but watching some Duran videos is a pretty kick ass way to spend my Saturday.  On top of that, it gives me a chance to celebrate this album a little bit before I dive into my relationship with it!

-A

Duranie Homework: Rank THANK YOU!

Last week, I asked people to rank the Wedding Album from their least favorite song to their most favorite song.  I now have the results from last week!  Based on the participants’ responses, here is how the fan community ranked the songs off the first album from LEAST favorite to MOST favorite:

  1. Shotgun
  2. To Whom It May Concern
  3. Breath After Breath
  4. Drowning Man
  5. UMF
  6. Sin of the City
  7. Shelter
  8. Femme Fatale
  9. None of the Above
  10. Love Voodoo
  11. Too Much Information
  12. Ordinary World
  13. Come Undone

Anything surprise you?  I was not surprised to see Ordinary World and Come Undone near the top as it often ranks high in other polling and tasks we have done.  I was surprised that Love Voodoo ranked as high as it did.  I wonder how much that has to do with the reappearance in the setlist.  Now, I can’t just let people sit back and enjoy the results.  Oh no, we need to move on!  Here is your new homework assignment!!

Directions:  You will rank the songs off THANK YOU from LEAST favorite to MOST favorite.  Please note:  In order to make your determination, you may need to re-listen to the album one or more times.

The songs that need to be included in your list are:

  • White Lines
  • I Wanna Take You Higher
  • Perfect Day
  • Watching the Detectives
  • Lay Lady Lay
  • 911 Is a Joke
  • Success
  • Crystal Ship
  • Ball of Confusion
  • Thank You
  • Drive By
  • I Wanna Take You Higher Again

How to turn in your homework:  Once you have completed your ranking and are ready to turn in your homework, you will need to head over to the Daily Duranie message board.  Specifically, you will post your homework in this thread here: Rank THANK YOU!.  Please note:  You may have to register for the boards in order to complete your assignment, if you are not already a member.    Of course, even after you post your assignment, you may want to go back to the thread in order to see others’ homework!  You can compare your homework to others as cheating does not exist for this assignment!

Your assignment is DUE by SUNDAY, JANUARY 24TH.

What is your assignment worth?  It is worth being a part of the larger fan community and having YOUR opinion count!  Besides, this is all just for FUN!!!  Another recommendation is not to think TOO MUCH!  Just go with your gut on how you rank the songs!

I will compile all of the results to determine how fans rank the songs off of Thank You.  From there, we will move on to the other albums.  Have fun!

-A

Duran Duran Albums A-Z

Daily Duranie welcomes new opinions and we wish to give all fans a voice. Today we feature a brand new guest blogger to Daily Duranie.  Enjoy!!

By Jason Lent

Understanding the impact of Duran Duran is near impossible if you did not experience it firsthand. They were pioneers of the New Romantic movement (which pulled its artistic aspirations from the likes of David Bowie and Roxy Music) and almost singlehandedly turned the music video into art. As a young kid discovering music, it was hard not to be lured into a world of exotic locations and mostly naked models set to exciting synth pop music.

Over the last thirty years, I’ve taken my share of jokes for sticking by Duran Duran through their musical highs and lows and I understand that the band will always be divisive amongst serious music fans. However, there is more depth and substance to their career than the majority of what passes for popular music in 2014. With that in mind, I dusted off every studio Duran Duran album they’ve recorded and ranked them from the most essential to the, um, best forgotten. I decided to skip the live album Arena (it’s a pleasant reminder of an epic tour but offers little to listeners) and the covers album Thank You which was disappointing but not quite as bad as most remember.

Rio (1982)

The point at which New Romantic music crossed into the mainstream and simultaneously established the fledgling MTV as a creative outlet that would shape the future of music. The impact of videos such as “Rio” and “Hungry Like The Wolf” are so culturally significant that the music gets slightly overlooked, which is criminal. As a band, Duran Duran hit on all cylinders throughout the record with John Taylor’s exquisite bass lines serving as the glue that holds the synths and electric guitar together to form one of the finest records of the decade. The album artwork also captured the decade perfectly adding to the overall aesthetic of a young band rising to the top of the world to define a generation. Quite simply, there are no weak songs on Rio making it the band’s preeminent album. At the time, “Hold Back the Rain” was just a kick-ass pop-rock tune but it takes on more meaning now knowing it was Simon’s plea to John to get control of his substance abuse, something that wouldn’t happen for another decade. The ballad “Save A Prayer” will always be the band’s most delicate moment while “The Chauffeur” closes the album on an artistic road that kept the band’s pop success balanced with their more artistic interests. This Duran Duran album is essential to any music collection.

Duran Duran (1981)

The perfect example of the New Romantic movement in music, Duran Duran’s debut sounded fresh and exciting even before the artfully conceived videos took the band to larger audiences. While “Planet Earth” and “Girls On Film” remain some of the band’s most notable songs, the album has a whole captures the essence of Duran Duran. The second side of this Duran Duran album edged into darker, moodier territory that revealed a depth to the music that critics have often overlooked. The opening two minutes of “Night Boat” strike a sinister mood while “Friends Of Mine” and “Careless Memories” are spirited punk songs filtered through the New Romantic prism. When released as the second single, “Careless Memories” faired poorly and the accompanying video remains one of the few misfires in the band’s catalogue. Listening now, that song was far from disappointing and, like the rest of the record, has aged quite well. When the album was re-released in 1983, the hit single “Is There Something I Should Know?” replaced “To The Shore” which made sense for the band and record company though it doesn’t fit the flow of the album.

All You Need Is Now (2010)

How do you make a Duran Duran album that almost matches the greatness of the band’s early work? You dust off the old instruments and allow the talented Mark Ronson to guide the recording process. From the title single on, the band recreates the magic of their first three records while updating it for 2010. The hook of “All You Need Is Now” recalls the sway of “New Moon Monday” and there are plenty of other sonic touchstones that harken back to the biggest days of Duran. The opening synth of “The Man Who Stole The Leopard” recall the band’s instrumental track “Tel Aviv” from their debut album while the opening drums of “Girl Panic” are “Girls On Film” redux. Who gives a shit?! It’s shimmering pop-rock beauty that the band once did better than anyone on planet earth.

Notorious (1986)

Three years is a long time in music. For Duran Duran, it meant one live album (Arena), a troubled live performance at Live Aid, and a breakdown in the line-up. “Who gives a damn for a flaky bandit” sang Simon Le Bon in the title track letting the world know how the remaining members viewed departed guitarist Andy Taylor. The album was a departure for the band as the age gap between them and their fans was suddenly felt in the music. For a thirteen year old, Nile Rodgers was just a name the band occasionally dropped as an influence. With little understanding of Chic and the other bands that shaped the band’s style, Notorious felt like a sudden shift away from the new wave glory of MTV that they did better than others. Over time, this Duran Duran album has matured well and reveals a talented group of musicians finding space to write smarter songs. The title track and “Skin Trade” are two of their tightest singles and the feisty “Meet El Presidente” finds a new groove for the Duran sound. The album’s strength lies in the quality of the songs throughout. “Vertigo (Do The Demolition)” and “American Science” are stylish pop tracks that hold their own with the singles. Closer “Proposition” (placed at the opposite end from the title track that takes a dig at him) gives us a final taste of the band with Andy Taylor (at least for a few decades) and it’s clear that the band’s sound needs his razor edge on guitar to compliment the synth explorations of Nick Rhodes. An album that has held up very well in the Duran Duran story.

Big Thing (1988)

To this day, I’m not sure why this Duran Duran album was such a disconnect for audiences. The singles didn’t make a lasting impact on the charts and the tour (at least at the Miami Arena, my first concert, finally!) played to less than full venues. After Notorious, I thought this was a bold step forward as the band pushed the music into new territory. “All She Wants Is” incorporates house music into the Duran sound to create a hypnotic tone and the accompanying video was one of the last great reasons to watch MTV. One of the band’s best ballads to this day, “Do You Believe In Shame?” opens a second half of the album which slides away from the dance floor towards the art house. The razor-sharp guitar the closes out “Lake Shore Driving” is the sort of six string showcase Andy Taylor would have eaten up had he not become a disillusioned guitar hero and left for a disappointing solo career (yes, I own Thunder on vinyl and yes, I’m still disappointed).  Why the b-side “I Believe/All I Need To Know” failed to make Big Thing while the dreadful “Drug (It’s Just A State Of Mind)” secured a spot mystifies me. Swapping those tracks would move this further up my list.

Seven And the Ragged Tiger (1983)

A complicated album from inception to completion, Seven is a difficult album for me to view through a lens not colored by nostalgia. After the monumental Rio, the band could do know wrong in my eyes and this record held my fascination. The lead single “The Reflex” needed a snappy remix to really bring it alive (“Whyyy-y-y-y-y-y-y-y-y- -don’t you use it”) and the live video helped showcase a slightly disappointing hit single. “Union Of the Snake” remains my favorite moment on the album. Andy adds some excellent guitar to the synth melody, the kind of small touch that future records would often be missing. While all quite fine, the non-singles tend to run together in my brain. “I Take The Dice” and “Shadows On Your Side” are interchangeable Duran songs. Heavily produced and sometimes sounding like a challenge to write, the success of this Duran Duran album resided more on the band’s name at that point in music.

Duran Duran – The Wedding Album (1993)

I remember exactly where I was when I first heard “Ordinary World” on the radio. I was returning from my girlfriend’s house and passing over Dixie Highway in West Palm Beach, FL. I pulled over after crossing the railroad tracks knowing Duran Duran was about to return to the charts. The song sat perfectly on the radio and remains a classic pop song. However, it’s not one of the better Duran Duran songs. It could have been recorded by just about any pop rock band at the time and lacked the unique Duran alchemy. “Come Undone” felt more like a classic Duran single and sounds beautiful with a slippery bass line and sexy rhythm. Opener “Too Much Information” still holds up as one of their better rock songs though the line “a cola manufacturer is sponsoring the war” feels a little uncomfortable coming from a band that Coca Cola sponsored in the 1980’s.  The rest of this Duran Duran album falters and suffers from an indistinctive sameness. The disappointing Lou Reed cover (“Femme Fatale”) serves as a harbinger of the Thank You album that would follow. In the end, a stylish Duran Duran album with three excellent singles is hardly a disappointing trip.

Astronaut (2004)

With the dismal performance of Pop Trash and no record label, it was a widely held assumption that Duran Duran were finished. The reunion nobody saw coming became reality (I figured Roger Taylor had retired from music forever and Andy always seemed like a loose cannon who resented his role in the band). To their credit, the band went into the studio instead of just filling arenas with the same reunion tour for a few summers. Opening track “(Reach Up For) The Sunrise” is a powerful reminder that, at its core, the rhythm section of Roger and John Taylor anchors Duran Duran. A driving chorus with Andy’s guitar jostling with Nick’s synths is Duran at their best. On the whole, the album proves a successful reunion of the Fab Five. “Nice” sounds like an updated Duran Duran, which is better than the slightly misguided band of the late 1990’s. This Duran Duran album suffers on the production side with just too much happening at once. It gives the record a cluttered atmosphere that they would sort out on their most recent work. At the time, any Duran Duran album from the original line-up would have been welcome but this album has aged well and remains sneaky good.

Medazzaland (1997)

By 1997, Duran Duran had crumbled as the creative entity that launched so many memorable albums. After the hugely disappointing Thank You record, the band was down to Nick and Simon with guitarist Warren Cucurrullo. Nick and Warren were the creative force giving this and it’s follow-up, Pop Trash, a unique place within the Duran canon. “Out Of Mind” completed Simon’s trilogy for a lost friend (“Ordinary World” and “Do You Believe In Shame” were the others) and sounded like an extension of earlier albums. However, the rest of the music moves into electronic dance sounds that felt alien to where Duran Duran started as a live unit. On a whole, Cucurrullo’s contributions to Duran Duran are difficult to assess. A gifted guitarist, it feels like he pushed the band into creative areas they might have been best to not explore. With the release of him and Nick’s side project TV Mania in 2013, some of this experimentation does make a bit more sense but Medazzaland is lacking in memorable moments.

Pop Trash (2000)

Album opener “Someone Else Not Me” hints at a return to form for Duran Duran but it was the only song written by Simon Le Bon for the album and it shows. With Warren Cuccurullo and Nick Rhodes in creative control of the music, this Duran Duran album feels like more of Medazzaland with a few less highlights. “Last Day On Earth” (written but rejected for a Bond film) gives the album a little more muscle and overall, the album does have a little more guitar pop than the more electronic Medazzaland. The acoustic driven “Starting To Remember” shows promise and is one of the better songs written during this period for the band but ultimately gets lost in a record of uninspired songs. At the end of the road with the record label, this was the first album I didn’t immediately buy from Duran Duran and I assumed (again, like I did after Liberty) that Duran Duran were at their creative end.

Red Carpet Massacre (2007)

The momentum of Astronaut may have corrupted the direction of the band when they returned to the studio. The original five worked on an album titled Reportage, which eventually reached the record label only to be rejected until the band recorded an obvious lead single. In their search for that single, the band began working with Timbaland and Justin Timberlake minus Andy Taylor, who would not return. The result is a trend-chasing Duran Duran album of club music that simply doesn’t work. The drums are heavily processed and the band’s more rocking edges are smoothed over until they are gone. Without hearing Reportage, it’s still safe to say the band would have fared better with their original plans. For a Duran Duran album trying to be dark and sexy, the album sounds embarrassingly bland.

Liberty (1990)

After Big Thing, I had high hopes for the slimmed down version of Duran Duran to remain relevant in popular music. Liberty seriously hampered my belief. For the first time, it sounded like the band was chasing trends and losing touch with who they were. Declining sales and success can do that to a band’s confidence. For the most part, this Duran Duran album attempts to capture the adult pop market in 1990, which was the least interesting direction the band could have pursued. The label eventually cut and run on the album’s poor sales and the album’s best track (“First Impressions”) never reached audiences. Even if it had, there’s not enough of Duran Duran in this album to ignite much interest. John Taylor, to this day under appreciated as a bass player, never found his groove with Sterling Campbell. It’s not a knock on Campbell, rhythm sections either click or they don’t. Without that, the band could not achieve the foundation for greatness that they had on earlier records. At the time, I remember thinking this was the end of the road for Duran Duran.

Jason Lent Guest Blogger thumbnailJason Lent discovered Duran Duran on MTV 1983 and a lifelong musical love affair was born. In 2010, he left a job in Hawaii to tour with Cowboy Junkies as a music writer and his work has appeared in various online music outlets. He currently resides in Las Vegas managing a music venue while trying to learn John Taylor’s bass line from Rio.