Tag Archives: Glasgow

If We Can Stay Awake

I have been sitting on my couch for awhile now trying to get some idea, any idea about what to write about. This is not common for me. Usually over the course of the week, I come up with many ideas, but not this one. I blame my lack of sleep. The sleep deprivation I have been experiencing has been forming over weeks. It isn’t that I didn’t get enough sleep last night (although I didn’t). I haven’t gotten enough sleep in days, even weeks. Then, the days have been packed with events and long lists of things to do. This results in not great sleep when I can get it as I am over-tired and stressed.

I am actually a really big fan of sleep. Most people, most adults, I know are. Yet, I have fond memories of times when I have gotten anything but. Strangely enough, many of those experiences surround touring. I wonder why. Here are some of my favorite highlights or lowlights or most sleep deprived moments or however you want to call them.

Is That Sunrise I’m Hearing?

My first real Duran Duran tour happened during this time of year in 2005 as part of the Astronaut Tour. I was extremely fortunate in that the tour swung through the Midwest at the exact same time as my spring break. This meant I was able to see five shows over the course of the week, including Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul, Moline and Detroit. It was definitely one of the best spring breaks ever, if the best.

In many respects the first weekend of that tour was the most fun. That weekend included the Chicago and Milwaukee shows. Like many others, Rhonda flew in for the weekend and it felt like a party from the very beginning as Duranies filled the hotel bar until the wee hours of the morning. Even after it closed, Duranies packed hotel rooms to chat, to laugh, to ponder everything and anything Duran. I believe that the first night of the tour, which was the night before the show, we got to sleep about 4 hours of sleep. Turns out that was a good amount.

The next night featured the Chicago show and an even later night. Again, the hotel bar was hopping as fans and the opening band enjoyed drinks until late. By the time our heads hit the pillow, it was very late or very early, depending on how you look at it, bringing our sleep total to about seven hours for the entire weekend. Then, Saturday night hit, proving that all things Duran are worth it or so we thought.

On Saturday, we drove up to Milwaukee for the show then did the obvious by driving back to Chicago in hopes of seeing the band after the show at their hotel. (Of course, who wouldn’t do that?) As the hours ticked by, we sat in the hotel bar, chatting, waiting, uncertain about what to do. At which point, I knew that I would need caffeine if I would be able to get us back to our hotel, resulting in a visit at an all night diner where Rhonda and I started laughing hysterically and couldn’t stop. If I had seen us, I would have thought we lost it, for real. By the time we got back to the northern suburbs, the sun was rising and there wasn’t really enough time to sleep before friends needed to be dropped off at airports. This means that we literally got a hotel room that we never slept in. All it did was store our stuff. Yes, we are geniuses.

By that Sunday afternoon, Rhonda and I found ourselves killing time by walking around a mall, waiting for her to be dropped off for her flight. We only had about 7 hours of sleep in three nights and had been up for well over 24 hours. At this point, we swear we started to hear “Sunrise” playing in the mall. Was it? We don’t know. Maybe? Maybe not? After all, it could have been an auditory hallucination. After I dropped Rhonda off, I began making phone calls as I ventured north to Madison. I was that worried that I would fall asleep at the wheel. Despite my exhaustion, I loved every minute of the weekend.

We Might As Well Stay Up

In 2011, we had one of our most favorite tours, which was doing a few shows in the UK in November/December. Initially, we were just going to do the shows in Brighton, Bournemouth and Birmingham. Then, we noticed great seats for the show in Glasgow for sale online. It would mean traveling up to Scotland and arranging a flight back to London but that show seemed to be calling us with the amazing seats available. On top of that, my friend was living in Scotland and could offer us a place to stay. We jumped at the opportunity.

That show in Glasgow was amazing. It was well worth the additional travel cost and money on top of the ticket price. Honestly, it remains one of my favorite shows of all time even if we didn’t stay too long after the show as we had to get back to my friend’s place in Edinburgh through the light snow that evening. Still, by the time we arrived back, there were only hours until we would have to turn around and get our ride to the airport. Right then and there, we decided to just stay up. After all, we didn’t want to miss our flight back to London, which would mess up the right of our travel plans or so we told ourselves. In reality, the show left us with such a concert high that we spent the few hours we had searching online for any videos of that show or any of the other shows we saw.

Touring Is Tiring

I have so many pictures of Rhonda and myself at the beginning of a tour looking refreshed and healthy. I have an equal number of photos of us looking beyond exhausted and that we had partied hard. I distinctly remember a sign I saw at O’Hare one time coming back from a tour that said, “I’m ragged. I’m raw. I’m a rock star.” I think it was an advertisement for shoes or something but that phrase sure felt fitting. Touring has always meant little to no sleep. While I do love sleep, the fun that we have had makes the lack of sleep totally worth it. I’m sure the heck hoping that I feel the same lack of regret come April 2nd, Election Day. Then, like any post-tour, I’ll recover and get ready for the next time. That said, anyone know how to bank sleep? Anyone? Anyone?

-A

When all around you earth turns to fire

When it rains, sometimes, it pours.

Last week was a rough week here. First, this very website went down – and not even with a blaze of glory, but with a White Screen of Death (for those unfamiliar). As that was being fixed (no seriously, AS it was being sorted through a flurry of texts), the family truck dies. That was a little closer to a blaze of glory. In fact, it’s still being worked on, and if you’re at all familiar with how much mechanics charge per hour, your jaw has hit your desk or floor. Mine did too when they gave us the estimate.Those two things happened on Sunday. (It was a long week!)

On Monday, our trailer, which was being towed at the time by our now “out-of-commission” truck, had to be retrieved. Another day, another rental car, or truck in this case. I think that was the day we found out just how far this little fix-it job was going to set us back.

On Tuesday night, our microwave died. I don’t know about the rest of you – but we rely on that little appliance a lot. I can deal without a truck (sort of), but the microwave? Come on now.

On Wednesday morning, I came downstairs to find a small mess around and near my coffee maker. I assumed that when I poured the water in to the machine the night before, I missed and didn’t notice. Nope. The coffee maker has a leak. Seriously???

Later on that day, I also found out that my last living uncle on my dad’s side passed away. My uncle Joe was 92 and had lived a long, full life. Like my father, he was Sicilian, and the family tales of his possible-Mafia involvement were semi-legendary. We never knew for sure, because he kept those cards very close to his chest (and I appreciate that simply because I didn’t want to be involved). However, I will say one thing about my uncle: he was the one person (after my dad died), I could call if I needed help. I knew and trusted that about him, even if I did not see him regularly. He lived in Florida and each year we exchanged Christmas cards. He’d tell me he was coming out that summer, and I’d smile, knowing that there was no way he’d make it. He meant well, and most of all – he was the last vestige of family I had left on my dad’s side. I will miss having that little bit of comfort. I think I’m still coming to terms with what it means and how I feel, particularly because I didn’t have time to really process it because of what I’m about to share next.

Next was Thursday. The piece de resistance to the week was coming home to find Walt’s rental car sitting next to the curb. As soon as I pulled into the driveway, I knew. I always do. I gathered my things, took a deep breath, ushered my youngest into the house and asked, “Were you laid off?”, already knowing what the answer would be.  “Yep.” , was the reply, coming from the kitchen.

Awesome

In the US – we say “laid off”, elsewhere you might call it “being made redundant.” In other words, he is now unemployed, which is a disaster with two kids in college who both need their tuitions paid this month.

What a WEEK.

So forgive me again for waxing nostalgic, as I take a minute or more to remember back to a much happier time. On this date in 2011, I saw Duran Duran in Glasgow, Scotland.

I don’t know that I’d say I’ve done a lot of traveling outside of the US. I feel lucky to be able to say I’ve done a little, that trip to Glasgow being a highlight. Many American people that I know or grew up with have never been outside of the country at all. To give the tiniest bit of insight, I think my parents were pretty average people. My dad had a white-collar job, but it wasn’t terribly high paying, and my mom was a secretary once she went back to work when I was about ten. We had most things we needed, but very few things that we really wanted, I think.

Vacations were a luxury, and the most we ever did for a family vacation was go camping – and that didn’t happen until I was in high school. Until then, my parents would take a two-week vacation from work each summer, but we didn’t really go anywhere, and that was not unusual for the parents of my friends, either. I flew on a plane with my parents exactly once, and that was to go up to the bay area to see family one Thanksgiving.  My dad considered flying to be a luxury, and not one we could readily afford. I had aunts, uncles and cousins – siblings of my father and their children, as well as the same on my mom’s side – that I never met because they lived across the country from us. I didn’t travel outside of California until I took a special trip to Washington DC in 8th grade, and after that I didn’t go on a plane again until I was well into college.

The idea of traveling to see a band is still pretty “out there” to many people, I guess. My friends from high school are surprised when they see my posts, not because I go to see a band (they’re used to that part now!) but because I’ve gone some crazy places to do it. One of my friends commented that the farthest she’s gone from home has been to Arizona, which is where she lives now. That’s pretty shocking to ME. There’s an entire world out there to explore, and yet a lot of the people I know would be satisfied to just see the capital of our country. That is why when I say the US is a big place and many people don’t travel outside of their general area, I say it with confidence.

So for more, one of the shows I’m most excited to be able to say I attended, was Glasgow. We weren’t even really supposed to be there! It wasn’t a part of our original plan at all, but when these tickets came up, Amanda and I agreed we should just do it. We took a train from Birmingham into Glasgow, which in and of itself was a fantastic trip. Then we stayed with Amanda’s friend in Edinburgh, and even spent time in that city before going to Glasgow for the show. I loved every minute of it. The winter markets, seeing ice and snow on the ground (yes, I’m from California and to me that’s a novelty!), going to a Scotch club and just walking around – memories I will keep forever.

And then there was the show.

It was our last show on that little mini-tour, and while I know the band likely had no idea who we were (Except for Dom – by then he was probably concerned I’d never go home!), I would swear they played with extra energy that night. Hungry Like the Wolf was ridiculous, as John and Dom came right to center stage and played off of one another. Amanda and I nearly had strokes! I reveled in the show, turning around to watch the crowd clap and respond. To say I enjoyed myself would be an understatement. I didn’t think I’d ever be able to top the experience I had at that Glasgow show.

So, when things are down, like right now, I tend to think about those moments. I don’t know if anything like that can ever happen again. I’d like to think so because otherwise, it’s all pretty hopeless, but you never know. I treasure the memories.

The other day I was chatting with someone online, and they mentioned that the nicest people they knew from the US were those who had traveled abroad. I understand what they meant by this. It is very easy to remain complacent and somewhat naive about the world we live in when we aren’t able to see HOW one another actually lives, There are a plethora of reasons for this, but I think when we rely solely on media for our information, it is very easy to make assumptions without verifying using our own eyes and experiences. My own eyes were opened much wider after my first visit abroad, and every time I get the chance to go somewhere new, I learn more.

I don’t know about the rest of you, but I’m hoping for a better week!

-R

Newcastle show canceled, 2011. Do you remember??

On this date in 2011, some of the longest “waiting” of my life began. Duran Duran was to play the Metro Radio Arena in Newcastle that evening, and was the first show to be canceled during the All You Need is Now tour.  Here’s the original announcement from DDHQ:

(from duranduran.com) Singer Simon Le Bon has today been diagnosed with a throat infection that is forcing the band to postpone their Newcastle Arena show that was scheduled for tomorrow, May 18. All fans should hold on to their tickets. Details of the rescheduled date will be forthcoming within the next couple of days.

I can remember hearing about this show being canceled. I can still feel the shock waves that reverberated through my body when my friend called to tell me the bad news that day. Every one of my hairs stood on end and I really didn’t know what to do.

Amanda and I, along with two of our friends, were to fly to the UK to see shows in Birmingham, Nottingham, Liverpool and London.  We were leaving in less than 48 hours for what was supposed to be the trip of a lifetime. I had an afternoon flight from LAX on the 20th and would arrive in London the 21st. I’d meet Amanda and the rest of our friends that day and we booked a car to drive us to Birmingham. We would stay at the Birmingham Malmaison in a very fancy suite that we’d spent a bundle to book, and continue on from there. It was going to be the second time I’d been to the UK, and the first time I’d ever flown outside the country without Walt. For me, the trip was huge.

I stood there by my stairs, listening to my friend rant on and on about what my choices were and whether or not she thought I should still “chance it” and make the trip. All I could do was stand there, bite my nails, and hope it was a one-time thing and that Simon would be fine for the next show, which was in Glasgow the following day.

Of course, it wasn’t. The next day, it was announced that Glasgow would be canceled. I was to leave the very next day, and this was about the time I began to panic.  I think I kind of knew our shows would be canceled, but I held out hope until the following day, literally minutes before I left my house. My bags were packed and I was waiting for my husband to arrive home to take me to LAX so I wouldn’t have to leave my car.  I believe I got a phone call from one of our friends, who alerted me to the latest announcement from Duran Duran, canceling the next three shows….all three of which I was supposed to attend.

I remember thinking about what my options were that day, but my husband quickly quelled any plans I had to stay home. “You’ve already got your plane ticket. You’re going.” I knew he was right. It was a lot to give up, and at the time, there was still that London show. It was possible he’d be able to do that, right? I gathered my things, made my flight and hoped for the best.

As we all know, the entire UK tour was canceled, so no – London didn’t happen. It was months before Simon was in the clear and able to perform again. The trip itself was good, but strange. In some bizarre way, I think going over there and experiencing the cancellation with people who understood how I felt was oddly comforting. Amanda and I tried our best to make the trip fun, and parts of it were. For me personally, the trip was cathartic. I can say that I came back home as a completely different person. A totally different fan.

I’m still annoyingly critical, sarcastic and judgmental. I still make plenty of rookie errors when dealing with the public. But, the love I have for Duran Duran is far, far different now. I think that trip made me see them as humans. Finally. Not every fan wants that. Some want to keep the band on their pedestal as perfect, mystical beings. That’s fine. It just wasn’t the path I wanted. I can’t say it’s helped with my writing or even the blog (I have still upset fans in the past and will likely do so again at some point), but I think maybe the trip gave me a little more perspective.

Later that year, Amanda and I went back, this time seeing shows and experiencing all that a Duran Duran tour in the UK had to offer. The memories from that trip are wonderfully happy and I’m glad I went back. However, the trip that taught me the most was the one that didn’t go as planned. Maybe there’s something to that.

-R

Today in Duran History – Glasgow and a bit of Mad World

Happy Tuesday, everyone!

On today’s date in 2004, Duran Duran played the SECC in Glasgow.

Do you want to know what I remember about Glasgow, and the SECC in particular?  It was bloody FREEZING in there.  I remember sitting and waiting for a show in December of 2011, complete with my down ski parka on…continuing to shiver.  I don’t think I completely thawed out again until I touched down back in California, a day and a half later.  Naturally, that was in the month of December…and this show took place in April.  So there’s that, right?  Who was there in 2004??

Also, today is officially MAD WORLD day!  That’s right, the release of Mad World – the book that all New Wave 80s music lovers should have, hold and caress fondly (but never nostalgically….no. We can’t have that…because we, my friends…are not old. We’re not nostalgic. We just know good music.), has been released today!!  If you haven’t already pre-ordered your copy and you’re not waiting by your front door to tackle the mailman or UPS guy, I urge you to rectify the situation immediately and order it from Amazon!!  Why, you ask?  I’m reviewing it.  Later today.

In the meantime, check out the Reddit AMA with Lori & Jonathan: Mad World Reddit

Need a link to grab the book?  Fear not, my friends.  I’ve got you covered: Mad World.

-R