Tag Archives: Ordinary World

Question of the Day: Sunday, February 16, 2020

Yesterday’s winner: Girl Panic

Which song better represents the All You Need Is Now Tour: Mediterranea or Ordinary World?

Coming Soon
Which Song Better Represents the All You Need Is Now Tour?
Mediterranea
Ordinary World

Question of the Day: Monday, February 3, 2020

Yesterday’s winner: Ordinary World

Which song better represents the All You Need Is Now Tour: Other People’s Lives or Planet Earth?

Coming Soon
Which Song Better Represents the All You Need Is Now Tour?
Other People's Lives
Planet Earth

Question of the Day: Sunday, February 2, 2020

Yesterday’s winner: Mediterranea

Which song better represents the All You Need Is Now Tour: Notorious or Ordinary World?

Coming Soon
Which Song Better Represents the All You Need Is Now Tour?
Notorious
Ordinary World

Question of the Day: Sunday, December 22, 2019

The last winner: Only in Dreams

Which song better represents the Paper Gods Tour: Ordinary World or Paper Gods?

Coming Soon
Which Song Better Represents the Paper Gods Tour?
Ordinary World
Paper Gods

Back to the Sugar Shack: Liberty Turns 29

Another Duraniversary popped up this week on the socials. Has it really been twenty-nine years since Liberty arrived, somewhat uncomfortably, in our lives? Often dismissed as the band’s worst album, it was a difficult album for me to grasp upon its release. The 80s were over, that much was clear and where the new decade was headed remained unclear. Caught between decades, Duran Duran’s Liberty remains an important piece of the band’s history, and might even be a more consistent listen than the commercial juggernaut that followed it.

As far as album openers go, Duran Duran has done far worse than “Violence of Summer (Love’s Taking Over)”, and it made for an effervescent first single. The 12” single was a wonderful introduction to the band’s new direction. The artwork and the video clicked for me, and I was excited about the album. Ultimately, it never wormed its way into my bloodstream like previous albums had. Some of this was the new decade and exciting new bands arriving on the scene. However, Duran Duran also bears some responsibility for putting forth an album where insecurity and over-confidence lock horns.

Overconfidence or insecurity?

The over-confidence comes through in the guitars of Warren Cuccurullo and the lyrics of Simon LeBon. Playing against the melody, as if to prove a point, Cuccurullo’s work disrupts the otherwise perfectly pleasant “Liberty” while LeBon’s socially charged lyrics on “Hothead” are all a bit silly coming from a band that capitalized on the decade of excess better than most. While the band revisits that sentiment a bit on “Too Much Information”, the song rocks so hard that I give them the benefit of the doubt. A cola company is sponsoring the war? Well, they also sponsored your biggest tour. We are winking at each other, right? 

The insecurity comes through whenever LeBon tries to sing about sex. Unless your Prince, rhyming jism and catechism sounds creepy and desperate. “Take Me To Your Water” doesn’t exactly conjure pastoral images of an English countryside and “Read My Lips” unfolds like a drunken come-on by a once cool geezer in a once trendy club. Listening almost three decades later, I hear a writer trying to recapture his mojo by becoming edgier. While it worked in 1990 for Madonna with “Justify My Love”, LeBon’s poetry was never meant to be so direct and explicit.

Liberty and The Wedding Album, side-by-side

It isn’t hard to pick “Serious” and “My Antartica” out of this album as the crown jewels of Liberty. I’d trade “Ordinary World” for “My Antartica” in a set list each and every show. It is more “Duran” than “Ordinary World” even if it didn’t re-ignite their commercial fortunes. The sophisticated “Serious” ranks up there with some of the best music on Notorious and still sounds like a hit single to me. Having hung my heart on the importance of Andy Taylor’s guitar, the rock-n-roll stomp of “First Impression” remains an absolute high point even if the song is, ahem, a bit like this Lords Of the New Church song (https://open.spotify.com/track/3Em6rJJUdozR2qj6jnAZ5u). If nothing else, it finally gave Sterling Campbell’s youthful energy room to move.

But, really, is Liberty a more consistent listen than the wedding album as I hypothesized earlier? Side by side, I find about six songs on each that I am excited to hear more than a few times a year. The production of Liberty is, even by the band’s own admission, dreadful. The rumor of demos being out there on a bootleg sounds tantalizing (someone hook me up!). Much like the fabled Reportage, a different production might have yielded a far different result for the album and the Duran Duran story could be totally different. However, the wedding album has some filler on it and the cover of “Femme Fatale” should have been enough to sink the whole idea of a covers album. 

For your reconsideration

Without Liberty, the band would not have been forced to reconsider everything. Commercial flops have a way of doing that. Returning with a hit single in “Ordinary World”, the confidence of a band rejuvenated was enough to sell us on an album that wasn’t a huge artistic leap from Liberty. If anything, revisiting Liberty on its 29th anniversary makes me appreciate how important it was in shaking up the band. We learned that Campbell was not a good fit, that LeBon’s lyrics were best when shrouded in metaphors, and that the band could write sophisticated pop songs when they didn’t push too hard to fit into the foreign landscape of a new decade. For their so-called worst album, that is a pretty fabulous outcome! 

Fear Today, Forgot Tomorrow

One aspect of Duran Duran’s songs that I appreciate is how the meaning of their songs can mean different things to each individual person and can be interpreted in multiple ways even to the same person over time.  Even songs that seem obvious in terms of what they mean can be seen from different perspectives.  One song like that is Ordinary World.  We all know that the lyrics are about the loss of Simon’s friend, which means that the song can be easily applied to any situation of grief.  For me, personally, I have never listened to the song to deal with my own grief, but I have used the song to deal with what life has thrown at me.  For instance, I remember listening to the song when I had first moved to Madison.  I didn’t know anyone and was trying to figure out how this whole adulthood worked.  Needless to say, I needed to find my ordinary world.

Now, I find myself listening to the song in a new way.  If you are in the United States, I’m sure you know that Tuesday is Election Day.  While I have been working hard to ensure that candidates I support win, the reason for this is as much about the people themselves and my desire to find an ordinary world.  Since 2016 and even 2010, I feel like my ordinary world left me.  Here’s the deal.  The results of elections affect people.  They have consequences.  They did for me and they have for people I care about, including my students.  I feel like Simon in that the life that I recognized went away.  I am seeking a new less terrifying world, one in which people are not attacked for who they are, what they do for a living or how they want to find happiness and opportunity.

The thing about the song, Ordinary World, is that it seems to speak about a moment in which a life marker is placed, something to show something significant happened.  There is life before and life after.  That is how I feel about both 2010 and 2016.  The end of 2010 and 2011 was tough with family deaths and challenges at work and with work.  You know what got me through?  Duran Duran.  They helped me find as normal, as ordinary of a world as possible.  I had something to focus on that eased the pain, the grief.  Unfortunately, I did not have as much Duran related activities to distract, to help me get through since 2016.  Sometimes, I am thankful that I can just focus on my activism and what needs to be done.  After all, what happens in my community, state, country and world matters a lot to me and I refuse to be a spectator.  That said, having some fun helps give me the necessary breaks to keep going, to keep fighting.

Thankfully, I do have a few Duran related events that I can now look forward to.  I have a couple of shows in February and I suspect that Rhonda will be announcing that it looks like we will be able to plan for a mini-Durandemonium for February in Vegas.   Stay tuned for details.  All that said, I’ll be really excited if it feels like my ordinary world can return.  Tuesday will tell.  (If you live in the United States, please VOTE people.  I strongly believe that this is the most important election in my lifetime and your voice matters.)

-A

Guest Blog: How I Discovered Duran Duran in 2018!

Truthfully, it isn’t every day that we run into a brand new fan, particularly those that discovered the band in 2018, just a few weeks ago! Today, we are thrilled to share a story that will sound very familiar to most Duranies – once again proving that there is absolutely ZERO age limits on being a fan! Enjoy – R

by Kathy Diaz

Duranies all have stories about how they discovered the band.  Most fans likely found the band back in their teenage years during the early 80’s, when the band began their career and during their golden days of glory. My story is quite different, especially because I didn’t grow up in the 1980’s. I was born in 1986, just months before Duran Duran released their fourth studio album, Notorious. By the time I was born, they already had a steady career, but I didn’t learn about them until much later. I missed their comeback in the charts with “The Wedding Album” in 1993, and even their reunion of their original lineup in 2003. I didn’t even take notice of them when they first released their latest album “Paper Gods” in 2015.  No, it wasn’t until 2018—yes, just this very year—that I found this band and became a fan. 

I always have been a fan of 80’s music, as I grew up listening to Michael Jackson and Madonna. I knew about the existence of a band called Duran Duran, but I never really paid much attention to them before.  Up until this year, the only song I could recognize by Duran Duran was “Ordinary World”.  I probably listened it on the radio when I was a child, but I didn’t know who sang it, or even the name of the song.

It all started a couple of weeks ago, when I was searching for new music for my Spotify playlists.  I stumbled upon a YouTube channel that makes lists of songs by the year. I was watched the playlist for “Top Songs of 1982” that I came across  “Hungry Like the Wolf”. I was immediately impressed.  The song, video, and  lead singer—whose name I later learned to be Simon Le Bon—all stuck with me.  A normal person would have looked for the song, downloaded it and that was the end of it.  Not me. I had to look up the video of “Hungry Like the Wolf” again.  After I finished watching it,  I knew I was completely hooked. It was like love at first sight. 

I spent the rest of the night watching some of their other music videos and I was in awe with “Save a Prayer”, “Rio”,  “Is There Something I Should Know”, and “Wild Boys”. I kept asking myself: “How I didn’t discover this band before?” “Where was I living, under a rock?!?” Apparently! After this discovery, I knew I would never be the same again.

During the following days, I indulged myself in a Duran Duran marathon from morning-to-night. I figured that since I was on vacation from work, I had the time to do it. I spent those days listening to their songs, watching their music videos, and looking for any information I could. I quickly learned the history of the band, the names and backgrounds of each member, and anything else I could find on the internet. Their songs give me a warm feeling. I could be feeling down, or stressed, but when I am listening to their songs, I feel happy, calm and joyful. It is rare for a band to have this effect on me.

I felt alone in this new obsession because I didn’t know anyone who were also a fan of this band, so I decided to search in Facebook for Duran Duran groups. I found two amazing groups full of Duranies who gave me a warm welcome to their inner circle, even though I was kind of an outsider since I had just become a fan only weeks ago and they all had been fans for almost four decades.

Then, some moments of frustration came. I found out they played in my country, Puerto Rico just 2 years ago. Before that, they played here other 3 times. I was so distracted by other things that I didn’t discover them in time to go to any of those shows. Sometimes I wish I could go back in time and slap myself in the face for not paying attention before.  I am thankful that they are still together and making music,  but it also makes me a bit sad that I had to discover them in a dry period when there is no news on new albums or tour. I don’t know why I had to discover them now, was it fate or just coincidence?

All I know, is that this band is giving me joy and happiness with their music. That is something I thought only could happen when you were a teenager. I believed my years of “fangirling” for a band were over long ago. I didn’t ask for this, but Duran Duran just came into my life, changed it and I didn’t expect it at all. 

I still have a lot to catch up on, but I feel happy to be part of this fandom. I so look forward to what Duran Duran has in store for the future. Hopefully one day, not too far in the future, I will finally see them live for the first time. Until then, I will enjoy this new interest as much as I can, however possible.

Kathy Diaz is a newbie Duranie. She lives in Puerto Rico where she works as an Elementary School Teacher. She is also fan of Harry Potter, Doctor Who, and basically everything and anything that is British. You can follow her on Twitter: @KathyDi86 

One Perfect Day

Every now and then something comes up in Duran Duran’s history that I didn’t already know. Occasionally, it will even be timely!

For example, did you know that “Ordinary World” was used on a soundtrack for a movie released titled One Perfect Day, which was released on this date in 2004?

Not only did I not know or remember that this happened, I don’t know the movie at all.  It turns out that this was an indie movie, which probably explains why I’d never heard of it. I can barely keep up with the larger releases much less anything else.  The story is about this music student who wants to write this song called One Perfect Day. He has a girlfriend in Australia who goes out clubbing with his sister, and unfortunately his sister ends up dying, and the girlfriend admits to having a part in her death. The musician ends up getting involved in the underground rave scene in Australia himself, and as the story goes – tragedy looms.

More fascinating than the movie itself, is the idea that a song released over a decade earlier was being licensed for a movie. If that doesn’t say “timeless”, I just don’t know. Yes, Duran Duran struck musical gold (and probably real gold as well in one aspect or another!) with “Ordinary World”.  That song, along with several others in the Duran Duran catalog, will live on forever, I think. And we wonder why they still play them live….

-R