Deprecated: Hook custom_css_loaded is deprecated since version jetpack-13.5! Use WordPress Custom CSS instead. Jetpack no longer supports Custom CSS. Read the WordPress.org documentation to learn how to apply custom styles to your site: https://wordpress.org/documentation/article/styles-overview/#applying-custom-css in /home/wwwdodbj/public_html/wp-includes/functions.php on line 6078
I Wanna Take You Higher Again - The Daily Duranie

I Wanna Take You Higher Again

Last but not least, we are finishing up our review of the Thank You album by listening to “I Wanna Take You Higher Again”. This is simply an additional version of the earlier reviewed “I Wanna Take You Higher”, originally written and performed by Sly and the Family Stone and included as a B-side on “Stand”.

Let’s dive in!

Audio

Lyrics

Beat is getting stronger, feel it getting stronger
Sound is getting longer too
Music is a thought to me
I want to, I want to

I wanna take you higher
(Take you higher)
I wanna take you higher
(Take you higher)
Baby, baby, baby, light my fire
(Light my fire)
I wanna take you higher
(Take you higher)

Beat is nitty gritty, feel it nitty gritty
Sound is in your city too
Music’s been a thought to me
Don’t you, don’t you, don’t, don’t

Don’t you wanna get higher?
(Take you higher)
Don’t you wanna get higher?
(Take you higher)
Baby, baby, baby, light my fire
(Light my fire)
I wanna take you higher
(Take you higher)

Boom shaka-laka-laka
Boom shaka-laka-laka
Boom shaka-laka-laka
Beat is nitty gritty
I’m gonna take you high

Beat is there, I’m with you
Beating there to lose you
Sound is there to help you groove
Music’s been a thought to me
Everybody, take your places

I’m gonna take you higher
(Take you higher)
I wanna take you higher
(Take you higher)
Baby, baby, baby, light my fire
(Light my fire)
I wanna take you higher
(Take you higher)

Higher, higher, higher
I wanna take you
(Take you higher)
I wanna take you higher
(Take you higher)
Baby, baby, baby, light my fire
(Light my fire)
I’m gonna take you higher
(Take you higher)

Don’t you wanna get higher?
(Take you higher, take you higher)
I’m gonna take you high
(Take you higher)
I’m gonna take you high
(Take you higher)
Baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby
(Take you higher)

Baby, baby, baby, light my fire
(Take you higher)
Higher
(Take you higher, take you higher)
Baby, baby, baby, baby, baby, baby
(Take you higher)
Baby, baby, baby, light my fire
(Take you higher)
Higher
(Take you higher, take you higher)

I’m gonna take you
(Take you higher)
I’m gonna take you
(Take you higher)
I’m gonna take, gonna take, gonna take you higher
(Light my fire)
I wanna take you, I wanna take you higher
(Take you higher)

Rhonda

Full disclosure: In order to complete this review, I went back and listened to both the original, as well as the first cover included on this album.

Could two versions of the same song possibly be any more different? Whereas the first cover was hard-edged and seated firmly in the “rock” category, this version is far less so, almost feeling watered down. Opening with what sounds a lot like rewound tape of the earlier recorded cover, this one has no drums featured, and instead opens with vocals. While the song is still filled with plenty of effects and layers, and still comes off far messier than necessary, it also doesn’t feel quite as heavy.

While the guitar is found farther down in the mix, the bass and keyboards have been turned up. The keyboards are downright loud in the mix, and the bass is strong enough to support the chaos, which to my ears sounds like an improvement! There is no guitar solo to speak of in this version, which on it’s own isn’t a problem – but the section of effects they use in it’s place does very little to add any sort of interest. I still find myself asking “why bother with two versions of the same song?”

I am obviously speculating, but I’d imagine the answer has more to do with pleasing the egos amongst the band, and keeping the peace, than it does creative or artistic integrity or merit.

That’s the trouble with Thank You, and certainly this cover, overall. Even after all of these years, it is excruciatingly difficult to ignore what sounds like the collective ego of the band saying they could do it better, than it is to hear a genuine tribute to the people who once inspired them. While there are certainly stand out songs on the album, there are also plenty of songs that should have never been redone. So much so, that the listening experience is shadowed by the failings, rather than ignited by the triumphs.

Two and half cocktails
two and a half cocktails

Amanda

Before I start the actual review process, I find myself asking over and over, “Why?” What would make the band do a second version of a cover song? I can understand the desire for different mixes and whatnot of their own tracks but why do two very different covers?! Was it like Rhonda speculated that this had more to do with some sort of compromise between band members? Was there a big debate between them? Were some in favor of the first one and others the second? Or was it simply that they couldn’t decide so they included both? To me, this is almost more interesting than the song itself. Yes, I find all forms of politics interesting, especially when it deals with the politics within a band. That being said, I have to wonder how the record label took this inclusion of two versions. Did that all take some convincing? Oh, to be a fly on the wall…

So to start this actual review, I made myself go back and listen to the original, then to the first Duran version before moving on to the task at hand. I have to admit that after awhile my mind starting wandering, leading me back to my first point. Why do a second version? I noticed two big differences. This one felt less intense, especially at the beginning. The first Duran version hit you in the face right away with a heavy edge to it, featuring a lot of drums. This one, not so much. While there was significant instrumentation and effects especially after the song got going, it never equaled the first cover. It was the kinder, gentler version of the song, I guess. Was that the debate? Did some want it to be harder sounding than others? I also noticed the lack of female vocals compared to both the original and the first Duran version. Why did they choose to have less of that? Those female vocals seem to so significant in the other versions.

Did this version add much to the original or the other Duran version? No. It gave a slightly less harder but still full of effects version of a classic song that I’m not sure that they should have covered in the first place. It isn’t terrible and doesn’t make me want to run away and scream but it doesn’t thrill me either. The song is just there. It does not add anything to the musical conversation, in my opinion.

Two cocktails

By Daily Duranie

Once upon a time, there were two Duran Duran fans. One named Amanda, the other named Rhonda. Over many vodka tonics, they would laugh about the idea of one day writing a book about their fan experiences. While that manuscript is still being composed...Rhonda thought they should write a blog. (What was she THINKING?!) Lo and behold: The Daily Duranie was born.

Hey there, thanks for commenting! We encourage spirited, kind and thoughtful discussion. Thanks for participating!!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.