If You Can Hear Me, Let Me Know

If I think back to the blogs written in 2015 and 2016, many of them focused on the setlist. Often, these blogs, whether written by Rhonda or myself or others, expressed a frustration with the lack of changes in the setlist. Let me share a couple of them to prove my point:

Portland Show: August 2016

Paper Gods 
Wild Boys 
Hungry Like the Wolf 
A View To A Kill 
Come Undone 
Last Night In The City 
What Are The Chances 
Notorious 
Pressure Off 
Planet Earth / Space Oddity 
Ordinary World 
I Don’t Want Your Love 
White Lines 
The Reflex 
Girls on Film 

Save A Prayer 
Rio

Rome Show: June 2016

Paper Gods 
Wild Boys 
Hungry Like the Wolf 
A View To A Kill 
Come Undone 
Last Night In The City 
What Are The Chances 
Notorious 
Pressure Off 
Planet Earth / Space Oddity 
Ordinary World 
I Don’t Want Your Love 
White Lines 
Sunrise / New Moon On Monday 
The Reflex 
Girls on film 

Save A Prayer 
Rio

A quick glance at these two setlists show very few changes. This, of course, frustrated many, many fans, especially those fans who travel. People want to see and hear different songs performed if they go to multiple shows. They like unpredictability or not knowing what is going to come next. This increases excitement and anticipation. Yet, for the most part, the Paper Gods Tour was pretty much the same all the time. So, in response, many blogs were written encouraging, suggesting, pointing out the benefits of mixing up the setlist, at least a little bit. We talked about how fans who don’t travel won’t be hurt by this and might even start to head to different places for shows. Likewise, those who do travel would continue to do so or might even go to more, if the setlist changed.

So, the other day, I wondered whether or not the setlist changed after 2016, the year immediately following the release of the album and the majority of the Paper Gods Tour. Yes, the band played shows in 2017, 2018 and 2019 but those all feel like random mini-tours, to me, rather than part of a larger tour.

Here’s a 2017 from Oakland:

Paper Gods 
Wild Boys 
Hungry Like the Wolf 
A View To A Kill 
Come Undone 
Last Night In the City 
What Are the Chances 
Is There Something I Should Know 
Notorious 
Pressure Off 
Hold Back the Rain 
Ordinary World (dedicated to Ann Le Bon) 
I Don’t Want Your Love 
White Lines 
Girls on Film (Segue Edit) 

Save A Prayer 
Rio

That setlist looks similar to the 2016 ones but I notice that there were a couple of changes, including the addition of Is There Something I Should Know and Hold Back the Rain. I remember being at that show and being thrilled with these new songs in the setlist. In fact, looking back, I enjoyed the shows I went to that summer over some of the shows I saw in the summer of 2016 because I didn’t know what was coming. What about early 2019?

Vegas: February 2019

Choir Intro (new) 
New Religion 
Wild Boys 
Hungry Like the Wolf 
Come Undone 
Notorious 
Pressure Off 
I Don’t Want Your Love 
Ordinary World 
Seventh Stranger 
Tempted 
White Lines 
Planet Earth 
Girls on Film 
Friends of Mine 

A View To A Kill (with 007 intro) 
Rio

Wow. There are a lot more changes here with New Religion, Seventh Stranger and Tempted. The encore was not Save a Prayer and Rio. Hmm…this is starting to seem like the band did exactly what we were asking by mixing it up, even just a little bit. Does this pattern remain for the recent shows?

Vegas: September 2019

Hungry Like the Wolf 
A View To A Kill (with 007 intro) 
The Reflex 
Come Undone 
Anyone out there 
I Don’t Want Your Love 
Tempted 
Last Night In The City 
Ordinary World 
Friends of Mine 
Notorious 
Pressure Off / Uptown 
Wild Boys 
Girls on Film 

Universe Alone/Save a prayer 
White Lines 
Rio

Again, there were more changes. The Universe Alone appearing in the encore. More new songs were included in the main part of the show with Anyone Out There and Friends of Mine. I know that at the time of the shows we praised the heck out of not knowing what was coming next. Maybe this post is redundant but I wanted to acknowledge that the band did make changes to the setlist that many, many people asked for in 2016. I like realizing this and thought that maybe others would, too. I’m also hoping that this pattern continues for the next set of shows!

-A

Is Time Too Heavy To Hold?

Six years ago, on this weekend, I was in Chicago at our Duran Duran Fan Convention that we called Durandemonium. This convention took place over 3 days with a variety of events that ranged from Duran games to watching A Diamond in the Mind in a movie theater to a dinner and dance. By any and all accounts, it was a success as people came and had fun. In fact, many people formed friendships that night and kept in touch past that weekend. From our standpoint, it was also a success in that we were able to pull it off without losing our minds or going into serious debt. Of course, the question that is always hanging out there is will there ever be another one?

Looking back at the convention, the first two main emotions and thoughts that pop up in my mind are pride and fun. Contrary to what some might believe but planning and hosting a three day convention isn’t easy. There are lots of details that need to be planned, decided on and completed. I remember the months leading up to the convention and how many phone calls were made to the hotel, to the restaurant, and more. My email inbox was always full of quick questions, answers, and new concerns that would that risen to the surface since the last time I had checked it. I swear that as the messages increased so did the worry. Would we get it all done? Would people come? Would they have fun? The money worry doubled the anxiety as each venue required deposits and at one point, I was literally on the line for $20,000 if we didn’t have enough people show up. Yet, we pushed through with the help of all of the people on the convention committee and managed to hold it without any major problem. I still feel proud about that. I always will.

I can also admit that I had a ton of fun that weekend in between having to be “on” at various points. I danced my heart out at our dinner as well at Late Bar (an 80s club in Chicago), Howl at the Moon (a piano bar chain) and NEO (club that held an 80s night). I enjoyed quite a few drinks and many laughs over the course of the weekend. If all that wasn’t enough, I got to sing and dance to A Diamond in the Mind on the big screen with other Duranies. Who wouldn’t love that? If all that wasn’t enough, I saw people talking, laughing and forming connections with each other. It reminded me of when Rhonda and I met and bonded at a different convention in New Orleans in 2004. Mission definitely accomplished.

So the next question that usually follows is: Will there be another convention? If so, when? I won’t lie. We have thought about it many times. Sometimes, we have even picked out a place, a venue and started initial talks but something always stops the process. For one thing, it requires a serious commitment in terms of the amount of work. It literally took us months of planning to pull it off. During that time, Rhonda and I weren’t doing much else but planning and blogging. I didn’t have big projects outside of work and things were relatively calm on Rhonda’s end. Nowadays, it is tough for us to do that. After all, we are in the midst of a new writing project.

On top of that, it was stressful, not just because of the planning but also as the person putting myself financially on the line. I didn’t mind doing it but, ideally, if we were to do it again, I would love, love, love to be able to raise money ahead of time so that I am not paying thousands of dollars upfront to reserve spaces. This, of course, not only takes work but also faith in other fans. Do enough fans want a convention? Would they be willing to give money ahead of time? Do they like one we had last time? After all, we have gotten criticism for just meetups. Conventions can be much worse in terms of disagreeing with how we are organizing or when or where. That gets tough to take. On top of all that, hosting a major event like that isn’t always easy. Neither Rhonda nor myself are super excited about being the ones up front and out in the spotlight. We are much more comfortable doing behind the scenes work but hosting an event means that you have to step up, to some extent.

So the answer to the question is that I don’t know. I am not sure whether or not we will hold another convention. Personally, I am not opposed to the idea and rather enjoy putting something like this together but I also feel strongly that it would have to be the right time and place and that both of us would need to be 100% on board to do it right. So what do the rest of you think? Would fans be interested in another Durandemonium or has that time passed?

-A

Question of the Day: Saturday, October 19, 2019

Yesterday’s winner: First 11 Videos

Which video is better: Dancing on the Valentine or As the Lights Go Down?

Coming Soon
Which Video Is Better?
Dancing on the Valentine
As the Lights Go Down

New Duran Math

By Bart Van Bemmel


Math is the most universal language in the world.  It’s all around us.  It binds all living things together.  Even Duran Duran uses math….

On their recent Paper Gods Tour, Duran Duran went on record saying they use the mathematical formula of 3:1 for their set lists — for every three classics you get a new song.  But what if who ever runs Duran’s numbers didn’t take in account that their past two albums All You Need is Now and Paper Gods were going to be so magical that they created NEW CLASSICS?  Imagine that — a band that’s still around after almost forty years is still creating powerful and vibrant new music?  This modern material just can’t be locked away forever with no holdovers on future tours.  Not ONE song from All You Need is Now was held over on the Paper Gods Tour and I’m still not over it.  Fine, I’ll hold a grudge!  After all, it’s their fault they did this to me (and others).  And this is pretty much what inspired this blog post.  With a new album in the works and a prospective tour to follow, I’m here to show you why Duran’s set list “math” could be the way it is and why their common core needs to change.

Maybe I need to get all Stuart Smalley on Duran and give them my own daily affirmation: You’re good enough, you’re smart enoughand dog gone it — people like you.  But I understand why you are the way you are.  And I understand how you arrived at your 3:1 song ratio.  Some “Duranies” aren’t very forgiving when it comes to your band.  Often times they can be brutal — especially each time you to push yourselves, push boundaries, and be forwarding thinking with your music.  God forbid if your new album doesn’t sound just like Seven and the Ragged Tiger part two there will be hell to pay.  I often wonder if some in this fan base cripple your band with their own limitations.  It’s as if other artists and bands out there are allowed to grow up, but not you — NOT DURAN.  It’s as if some fans have fastened one of those retractable dog leash collars that they put on their kids in the mall around your neck.  You will NOT wander off, Simon!  Now add in the music media into the mix.  Are they any different?  When Bon Jovi re-invented themselves with the countrified sing-a-long, “Who Says You Can’t Come Home” and then soon after 2007’s Lost Highway album, it landed them their first ever release to debut on number one on Billboard.  But if DURAN were to ever be so bold to be something different (by all means I’m not saying country music here) — we will stand there — arms crossed, until you play one of your greatest hits.  

I get the whole Fab Five world domination effect you had, but we’re still here… and you’re still affecting us — 100 million albums sold later (ah — more numbers for you).  And I’m NOT sorry to say, but it’s highly unlikely that most casual Duran fans have been shelling out the dollars to fly from all around the world just to see you on your latest mini run of back-to-back sold out shows in New Orleans, Vegas, and others, just to hear you play the Reflex.  We aren’t the casual fans.  We’re the die-hards.  WE sold out those shows.  And we love all that YOU are — especially your “new” stuff.  

With that said, you have created NEW CLASSICS!  NEW MASTERPIECES beyond the greatest hits!  You have even said in an interview that the song What are the Chances from Paper Gods is the best ballad you’ve written since 1993’s Ordinary World.  That’s a pretty bold statement.  But, we’re here to tell you that we agree with you.  But what now?  Does this song fade away into Duran obscurity?  We can’t let this happen. 

So here’s my list of (4) NEW DURAN CLASSICS that should be considered and intermixed for future tours:

1. All You Need is Now (AYNIN)

2. The Man Who Stole a Leopard (AYNIN)

3. Pressure Off (Paper Gods)

4. What are the Chances? (Paper Gods)

Maybe factoring in “new” classics into the live-set ratio would create some kind of New Duran Math that could potentially throw this universe alone into some tailspin (see what I did there?).  But if any band was going to invent a new formula for rock and roll, Duran Duran would be the band to do it.  

I’m curious to see what you — the fans, think some of Duran’s new classics are in your comments!  

Question of the Day: Friday, October 18, 2019

50% of our participants own Unstaged while 50% do not.

Which video is better? (First 11 Videos was exactly that, a video tape with the band’s first 11 videos. Video 45 had two video clips of Girls on Film and Hungry Like the Wolf.)

Coming Soon
Which Video Is Better?
First 11 Videos
Video 45

What Is Rock and Roll?

Happy Thursday! Today, I have a deceptively simple, single question for you to ponder.

R&B+C&W=R&R (I never loved algebra that much)

What is rock & roll? What does that term mean to you? Yes, the topic has a little to do with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, purely because it was that topic that sparked some thinking about it, additionally – I have heard so many people say that rock & roll is dead.

Let me give you a little to chew on and mull over. During the 1950’s, and certainly by 1955 when DJ Alan Freed claimed to have invented the term, “rock and roll”, the oversimplified “recipe” for the music was R&B+C&W=R&R (rhythm and blues plus country and western equals rock and roll).

This recipe overlooks so much, though. A myriad of styles influence both R&B and C&W. It is crazy to boil it down to two styles and a bunch of letters. I never loved algebra in school anyway. It is an awful lot to think about though, so I implore you to think it through. Does rock and roll come down to just the music? What about the social and cultural forces? I am one of those people who just doesn’t buy into an algebraic equation being the answer to my greatest historical interest….okay, obsession.

Rock around the clock

Let’s try to tear this apart a bit more, starting with the earliest “rock and roll” music. While many people believe that “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley was what started the phenomenon, there’s absolutely zero consensus with that assertion. Did you know that there are actually 50 milestone songs from the period of time prior to 1956 that have elements of rock and roll (that aforementioned equation) in them? There’s no way to determine just which one was the spark that set off the explosion.

I’m not entirely convinced that the general public could listen to the radio in 2019 and actually hear those roots. Maybe some people with some songs, but for the most part? Probably not. Is that the problem, or the point?

Testing, bending and breaking

As Jason said yesterday, rock and roll’s roots are steeped in Southern blues. That rhythm and blues music was indeed Black American music – and white people loved it. The early innovators of the rock music you and I love, were all Black and/or African American. White people did not corner the market on rock and roll. Ever. Did you know that of the first artists that could have been considered rock and roll musicians prior to 1955, there is only one white artist to note? That would be Bill Haley. The music began to bend a racial boundary in a way that nothing else did prior. I think that’s worth noting. (I’m looking at you, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame nomination committee.)

During the 1950’s, the American youth had leisure time. A true “Youth Culture” evolved. The after school hours were spent socializing. Parents and the powers that be were worried about all of that spare time being spent on nefarious activities. People moved to the suburbs of cities, and “Main Street” America became a very prominent image. During this same period, Eisenhower was president, known for his very conservative, “squeaky clean” views. Soda shops, clean-cut boys and girls, letterman sweaters…all of those images are straight from 1950’s America, paired against the rebellious “rock and roll” image. Black leather jackets, smoking, motorcycles, fast cars, and oiled hair just to note a few of the stereotypical . The fear of kids listening to rock and roll, turning delinquent, and ruining their lives became a massive topic at home. As if listening to music was the complete opposite to work, rather than just a complementary aspect of it.

With a rebel yell

The kids still listened to rock and roll, of course. They rebelled. Do any of us really do as we’re told?? All any parent ever needs to do is say that something is trash, and kids will ruin their minds if they watch or listen, and that certain “something” will become the most sought after fad in America. That is precisely what happened as 1950 turned to 1960. The true rebels, these artists willing to put their work out there, were crucial to youth culture because they influenced kids, turning them onto blues, and politics and poetry. They served as a link for those who were culturally adventurous. Rock and roll was something far more than just background music to other activities during the 1960s. It inspired. It broke boundaries. It unified.

Gender roles, politics, social boundaries, race, sexism, AIDS, sexual practices, drugs, social and political activism….I could go on and on. The proof is in the history, and music is the magical link. Music continues to keep doing all of that. We talk, we argue, we unite, we make change, regardless of whether there’s a guitarists or ten keyboardists in the band we’re listening to. Think on that.

What is rock and roll

In wrapping this up, I don’t know that I agree about rock and roll being dead. They’ve been saying that since the days disco, and yet in hindsight it’s pretty obvious that the spirit survived the 1970s without too much of a problem. How can rock and roll be dead when it has inspired virtually every single piece of music that has been created since 1955? Yes, the sound of rock and roll has evolved since Halley’s “Rock Around the Clock” and Fats Domino’s “Blueberry Hill” or even Chuck Berry’s “The Twist”. Thank goodness. That’s called progress and should be applauded. There is no litmus, or purity test needed. Is the spirit dead, or can we just not see it right now?

What is rock and roll?

-R

Question of the Day: Thursday, October 17, 2019

86% of our participants own A Diamond in the Mind while 14% do not.

What about Unstaged?

Coming Soon
Do You Own Unstaged?

Why Don’t They Drop the Bomb

The annual list of nominees for the rock-n-roll hall of fame came out yesterday and I spent the better part of my day haunted by the idea of the Dave Matthews Band being inducted. Don’t get me wrong. I absolutely owned their first two (three if we count Remember Two Things) CDs in college. One of my favorite concert moments ever was seeing Dave, Tim Reynolds, and Jack Johnson singing Jimmy Buffett’s “A Pirate Looks At Forty” as a light rain fell on the lawn at Waikiki Shell in Honolulu, HI. It was magical. Remembering that moment tonight reminded me to stop worrying and love the bomb.

The bomb? Are you high? 

(writer winks at cat)

Simon LeBon famously declared that Duran Duran would be the band to dance to when the bomb drops. And you know what, we will be dancing to “Planet Earth” if that ever happens regardless of whether they are recognized with a picture in a museum in Cleveland, OH. I’ve been to Cleveland. I’m not sure an offer to have coffee with John and hit an art gallery with Nick would lure me back (note: I’m lying, I’d walk there for that). Duran Duran does not need this validation and, in some ways, I hope they never get in. The Hall of Fame is a broken concept because a lot of people have forgotten what rock-n-roll is. 

Iron Maiden. Judas Priest. Motörhead. T. Rex. Kraftwerk. Five of the most influential rock bands of all-time are still awaiting the call. The first induction took place in 1986. In 1986, these bands were either still making important records or influencing everything we heard at the time. The theoretical branches of rock-n-roll stretch in many directions but these five artists are huge parts of the damn tree. 

The Hall of Fame lost the plot years ago and realized their only chance at staying relevant was to deny entry to important bands to sustain interest. Knowing the loyal followings of KISS and Rush, the Hall kept them at bay for years to build hysteria. Are they doing the same with Duran Duran? I doubt it. The institution laughably nominated the Dave Matthews Band in their first year of eligibility. They really are that out of touch with the spirit of rock-n-roll.

Rock-n-roll is a spirit that cannot be seen. It is an attitude, not a guitar. It is the voice of youth, of rebellion, of change. It is not a lifestyle that you can package and hang on a wall no matter how hard Hot Topic tries. The two most disappointing parts of this annual debate are how few women are being recognized by the Hall and how much resistance there is to black music, especially hip hop, by the audience. 

The roots of rock-n-roll are in the Mississippi delta. From the crossroads where Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil to the Riverside Hotel where Ike Turner and his band worked up the first rock-n-roll song (“Rocket 88”), the town of Clarksdale remains ground zero. Listen to the lyrics of Son House and Muddy Waters. They embody the spirit of rock-n-roll with songs about overcoming the institutions that hold you back from your dreams. You can hear the same spirit in the best hip hop artists who used the instruments they had available to them: two turntables and a microphone. 

As for the lack of female artists being recognized, the Hall continues to prove that the patriarchy will never concede their power. If the Dave Matthews Band is eligible, that means that Ani DiFranco, Cyndi Lauper, Liz Phair, Alanis Morrissette, Tori Amos, Tina Turner, Sheryl Crow, Bjork, Mary J. Blige, and Annie Lennox are also eligible. These voices are more important to rock-n-roll than a band that sang “Hike up your skirt a little more and show the world to me.”

Why aren’t I talking about Duran Duran more? That’s my point. I’m more disappointed by artists such as LL Cool J and Alanis Morrissette not being recognized. I could write 5,000 words on how Duran Duran was a subversive reaction to England under Thatcher and was more politically successful than the Sex Pistols (actually, I want to do that, soon). Or, how John Taylor’s bass lines are revered by other musicians and Nick Rhodes is a mainstream Brian Eno. But, it wouldn’t change the minds of those currently running the overpriced museum in Cleveland.  

Instead of knocking on the door of an institution that lost sight of why rock-n-roll is important to each new generation, we should be celebrating Duran Duran’s annual snub as a call-to-arms. With each new album and sold-out tour, Duran Duran are laughing at the Hall of Fame. It has reached a point that the Hall cannot admit they were wrong. Had the band stopped after The Wedding Album, the Hall would probably have inducted them when the band was hanging with Justin Timberlake; if only to seem relevant to the Timberlake demographic. But they didn’t and we should not think about being nominated ever again. Someday, the bomb really will drop and we still have Duran Duran booked as the house band. I’ll take that over a statue in Cleveland.

Question of the Day: Wednesday, October 16, 2019

61% of our participants own Live at Hammersmith ’82 and 39% do not.

What about A Diamond in the Mind?

Coming Soon
Do You Own A Diamond in the Mind?

2020 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominees

Alright. It is Tuesday, and I am fired up today, my friends. I have had two travel-mug sized cups of coffee, I’ve listened to the list of nominees for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and I am ready to comment. Get yourself a beverage and strap yourselves in, because it’s about to get rocky.

First of all, allow me to rip off the bandaid now. No, Duran Duran wasn’t nominated this year. Let’s all just take a collective, cleansing, breath. I need one, don’t you? While you’re deep breathing, here’s the list:

Pat Benatar

The Doobie Brothers

Motörhead

The Notorious B.I.G.

Soundgarden

T. Rex

Thin Lizzy

Whitney Houston

Depeche Mode

Judas Priest

Kraftwerk

MC5

Nine Inch Nails

Rufus feat. Chaka Khan

Todd Rundgren

Ready?

The fact is, not everyone can get nominated, and not everybody can get in. There are many noteworthy acts on this list, and about half are first time nominees. One of them – the Dave Matthews Band – is not only a first time nominee, but also a first time eligible.

On a purely personal note, I am thrilled that Depeche Mode was nominated, love seeing Kraftwerk on the ballot again, and I’m hoping that Pat Benatar gets in. I’ve already voted, and if you haven’t, DO IT. Just go to Google and type in Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

It is very hard to look at this list and not notice the glaring omission. Yes, we ARE that biased. Of course we are. We all know Duran Duran should be on that list. I listened to Feedback this morning in hopes of getting a better understanding of why they’re not. It comes down to two glaring problems in neon lights for Duran Duran.

First of all, there is a nominating committee that gets together on a single day (in person, no call-ins!). This committee is made up of critics and musicians, and they each bring the name of a possible nominee that they feel is worth making the case to include on the ballot. This is also where it gets political. People posture for their chosen favorite, they consider genres, whether the bands/people they choose are enough to get fans interested, and that sort of thing. I’m not going to mince words here though – as long as there are critics deciding who is going to be included on the ballot, the bands who are truly the most “worthy” by the people who listen to them will never really be considered.

I think even our band knows this. Likely, this doesn’t make them nearly as angry and fired up as I am today. They’ve had 40 years to practice tempering themselves. I’ve had…well, nine. (I am a slow learner) While my UK friends will patiently remind me that this is only an “American” thing and that it probably doesn’t matter to Duran Duran – the fact is, the American music scene is the biggest in the world. This is the country that, historically speaking, bands have worked incredibly hard to break. Even The Cure says they’re excited to vote this year, according to Lori. However, none of that matters to me as much as what I’m about to say.

I am sick to death of the inherent sexist BS that pervades music, whether you’re an artist, or you’re a fan like me. Even as the nominees were discussed on Feedback today with Joel Peresman (CEO and president of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation), and Alan Light (rock journalist, critic and host of Debatable on SiriusXM radio), the subject of Duran Duran came up. While they refused to comment one way or another if the band had even been mentioned during the behind-closed-door discussion of nominees, Alan Light commented that the band “really isn’t thought of” in the same way as the other bands on the lists. He inferred that the audience was somehow different, and they weren’t really seen as “rock”. Quite frankly – the overall discussion felt very dismissive at times, despite Lori Majewski’s valiant efforts to be heard.

I could…and did…write a lengthy essay on the obvious sexism, before I deleted it all and started over here. FM radio, pop from the 1960’s forward, even the Sgt. Pepper’s album by The Beatles….it all takes part. Suffice to say, we have work to do. Even Duran Duran sees it, that’s why they are so eager to share that they appeal to guys now, as if they never did before! I am one of those little girls who fell in love with Duran Duran. Chances are, if you’re female and reading – you are too. Collectively, we little girls are the band’s biggest supporters, and comprise the sharpest double-edged sword possible.

So that’s where we are, folks. Sure, the Rock Hall had some turn over this year. I won’t say I’m sorry that Jann Wenner has left his post, although he’s still on the Board, I believe. It just isn’t enough. I heard Lori continuing to ask if anything had changed on the Board this year or if the nominating group had changed – unfortunately the answer was no, not much. (one female added. Really? One??)

We have a long way to go before the discussion of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is about the music. Somebody should write a book.

-R

An outspoken examination and celebration of fandom!