Category Archives: Uncategorized

Happy 58th Birthday, Roger!

My favorite original member of Duran Duran has a birthday today.  That alone makes me smile! I love the days when I can gush unabashedly, particularly when the person involved is my favorite.

I have been a Roger-girl from as close to day one of my fandom as possible. The Planet Earth video certainly may have had something to do with it, as would any of the band pictures they’ve ever taken. I liked that he seemed quiet and shy, because I was too. I felt like I was able to relate to him, even though I knew (even as an adolescent) that I was way the hell out of his league. I think that is what made Roger “safe” for me as a crush: there was little chance of being rejected because he didn’t even know I existed, unlike the boys at school who would openly call me “ugly” or gag when I would walk by. (Oh yes, it happened, far more than often than I care admit) If nothing else, Roger was safe to crush on purely because there was zero chance I’d ever meet him.

Like many, I was sad for me, happy for him when he got married, and far more so when it was announced he’d left the band in 1986. I always wondered what happened to him. I’d heard so many rumors, ranging from a breakdown to retirement – I just wanted to know what happened. Of course, we all had the chance to see who Roger had become once they did the reunion tour in 2003.

I don’t know about the rest of you, but I was a little surprised. I don’t know what I was expecting now that I think about it. I suppose he wasn’t nearly as shy as I’d remembered. Still every bit as handsome, though. And then there was that one time I actually spoke to him at Virgin Megastore in Hollywood. According to my oldest, I did everything but propose marriage – but she also has her mother’s gift of EXTREME EXAGGERATION. I just told him I was glad he came back, that he was always my favorite, and then I thanked him for doing the signing because I didn’t think I would have ever had the chance to meet him otherwise. He gave me a huge smile and said thank you for being so sweet, and then I floated away and couldn’t feel my body for two days.

I’ve run into him very sparingly since then, never for meaningful conversation, but I have managed to make him laugh a few times. I’m still a little intimidated by him because…well, he was the equivalent of my Prince Charming in 1980-something. The pedestal he once stood on has long since been knocked over and I’m well-aware of his humanity by now, but there’s something about running into a one-time crush that sticks with me. I think it might be my inner-teenager speaking to me!

These days, Roger is married to the devastatingly beautiful Gisela, and has a gorgeous family. He seems happier and healthier than ever, for which I am thankful. I’ve forgiven him (ha!) for carelessly tossing our Daily Duranie wristband aside all those years ago at Spy Bar. (even though we were able to get Nile and John Taylor to put it on without a problem) I get it. He couldn’t even see us, much less care about what we had thrown to him at the time. I still haven’t ever gotten his sticks at a show. There was that one time he tried to throw them my way, but…it wasn’t meant to happen.  Maybe someday the opportunity will strike, and if not, that’s OK too. I have a feeling I’ll still manage to survive.

No matter what, no one else ever seemed to quite belong behind that drum set in the way he does, and I’m hoping he sticks with it for the long haul. He’s a part of this crazy family whether he likes it or not!

Happy 58th Birthday Roger! Here is hoping for many more healthy and happy years ahead!

-R

 

She’s Not Afraid of Leaving

Recently, I had a long conversation with my mother about friendship.  I’m not even sure how we got talking about that but the conversation got me thinking.  As I considered the conversation, I started to think about how my students and how they have met their friends.  Here, the answer is obvious.  They met their friends in classes, through their parents, in clubs and sports.  In fact, they spend a lot of time with their friends, which could make their initial friendships deeper and stronger.  Looking back to my youth, I experienced the exact same thing.

What about as an adult?  I have definitely made friends from work.  In fact, some of my closest friends now are people I have worked with.  Beyond that, I have met people through various political activities and through other people.  Yet, when I think about friendships, I often turn to fandom.  How many people have I met through fandom?  Countless.  You might think that I’m exaggerating but I don’t think I am, especially if I consider online friendships.  While I have not met every Duranie I know in person, I have met a bunch of people through this fan community.  In fact, I would say that the people I have met keeps me here when I might not have otherwise.  It is great fun to go to events and know that you will run into people you know.

This makes me wonder about why friendship within fandom seems so unique.  When I compare my friendships from fandom to other friendships, there is something different there.  For one thing, real life friendships seems to take longer.  There is a lot more surface conversation or small talk with real life friends.  It feels to me that it takes a long time to develop real trust with colleagues, for example.  Yet, I don’t sense that as much from fans.  There does not seem to have as much small talk with fan friendships.  I might even go so far as to say that I think there is more chances for equal trust.  Take my friendship with Rhonda.  I didn’t know much about her when I met her for the first time and we hit it off right away.  In fact, we decided to go to a show together and share a hotel room right after having met in person only once.  How did I know that I could trust her?  I don’t know.  I just did.

Does this immediate connection and trust happen because you share the same passion?  The same love for a band?  Maybe.  It is almost like being members of this exclusive club means that we understand each other deep at the core.  We understand something that doesn’t need to be described but something that defines us in a way.

Then, I wonder what happens when that passion does not remain.  What happens when friends leave the fandom?  Does the friendship remain?  I wonder.  I have friends who have left the fandom.  Am I still friends with them?  Yes, I am, but it doesn’t feel the same.  Why the heck is that?  I don’t have a good answer for this.  Could it be that it feels like a rejection of that something that lies at the core of your being or is it a matter of lack of having something in common?  I don’t know.

What do the rest of you think?  Does fandom breed quicker, closer friendships?  Then, if it does, can those friendships last in the same way if one of the people leave the fandom and the other doesn’t?  If not, why not?  What’s the deal there?

-A

San Diego Sports Arena, 2005

I’m not going to lie. As you read this, I am doing one of two things:

  1. I am acting administrator for my school while my boss in on a week-long field trip to Catalina Island. I could be either pulling my hair out, rocking in a corner, figuring out why the high school kids continue to use the bathroom for the little kids (which isn’t allowed), ordering supplies, or breaking up a fight. Or everything at once!
  2. I’m sitting in my school’s office, which is really a library with a folding table in it that acts as my desk…reading James Comey’s book, which is out today. Yes, I pre-ordered it, and yeah – I’ve been anxiously awaiting its delivery. No, I’m not a politically active person, but I do love reading personal accounts of historical periods. This will go down as one “legacy” (of many) during the era of Trump, no matter how one feels.

Chances are, I’m probably doing more of the first than the second. This is going to be a rough week in more than one way. I may need to play “Pressure Off” on repeat just to remind myself to keep breathing.

On this date, Duran Duran played at the San Diego Sports arena in 2005. This was one of the dates during the Astronaut Tour. Although it was fairly close to me, I wasn’t there. Oh yes, I know why – this was during the time where my husband felt it was “insane” to go to more than one show on a tour. “Aren’t they all the same?  Why go more than once?”

Funny. I went to two shows during the Astronaut tour: Chicago and Milwaukee. Even that was out of line as far as he was concerned. Oh, honey. Fast forward to Paper Gods. Over the course of the entire tour – multiple legs – I believe I attended seventeen shows.

Yes, it was excessive.

Yes, I’d do it all again, too. “Just buy the ticket” is a good motto, because you just never know if you’ll have the chance again.

However, the point is that I was not in San Diego in 2005. Were you? Let me know!

-R

Bell Centre, Montreal 2016

On this date in Duran history, the band played at the Bell Centre in Montreal in 2016. This was one date included along the way for their Paper Gods tour.  I know of at least one person who was there that night, too!  (A big hug and shout out to Heather!)

I don’t know about you, but right now, that date in 2016 feels like a decade ago.  Amanda and I were in the depths of writing. I can remember that we’d constantly tell one another that the road trip we would take later that summer would be the payoff for all of the hard work we were doing at the time.

I also remember getting messages from our friend Heather that night while she was in Montreal. I think it is fair to say she had a great time at the show, not that she would have ever expected otherwise. Amanda and I haven’t gotten too many opportunities to hang out with Heather in person over the years, although we’ve squeezed in a road trip and a visit since we first met her in person at our Durandemonium convention in 2013. She lives in Canada and pretty far from Montreal, as I recall. Even so, having the band perform there was like leading a bee to honey!  She drove the many miles between her house and Montreal, and I dare say she’d probably do it again if given the chance!

Whenever I think back on the Paper Gods tour, I get this wistful, far off feeling wash over me. It is the one tour that I look back on and feel like I did everything I wanted to do.  Oh, except Hawaii. Yeah, I couldn’t manage that one….dammit there’s always something! That wistful feeling, though  – the past six months have felt incredibly long. I know I just saw Duran Duran in December, but the real tour feels so long ago. So much has happened in such a short duration, and I know more is coming down the pipe in the few months ahead. The Paper Gods tour was something special. It was a time in my life I will continue to look back on with fondness, so I don’t mind these memories popping up from time to time. They remind me that life rarely stays the same for long.

-R

Respecting Fan Spaces

As Amanda wrote over the weekend, she is considering where to take this blog. I’d like to share where I’m at in all of this, for those who may be interested.

The band is on some sort of hiatus, at least when it comes to performing. I don’t know what, if anything, they’re working on. They certainly deserve time off, and I’m not questioning that. However, we write about them. We write about being fans. Without the band doing much, it makes blogging a creative challenge. In and of itself, that doesn’t bother me, but it is something I consider. I tend to split my posts evenly between dates in history and fan issues – but sometimes it can all get a bit thin. I mean, there’s only so much one can write about a performance somewhere or a radio interview. On the other hand, topics having to do with fandom are another ball of wax.

I have found, over the course of the past eight years or so, that people either love us or hate us – and many start out loving us until we write something they hate. Not surprising, but definitely has its annoying moments. Not enough to make me stop blogging, but more than enough to convince me to keep my circle of genuine friends incredibly tight. I’ve learned that writing about fandom can be a double-edged sword. In many ways, it is eye-opening, and feels cleansing (for me) to understand why things happen the way they do. On the other hand, I’m examining something that most everyone has a lot of time, money and emotion tied into. There are always a few fans that are instantly offended, likely because they see a bit of themselves in what we describe and they don’t like it.

I’m going to write the explanation again in case it wasn’t understood before. We are really not judgmental of fans, although yes, sometimes I ask and present tough questions. I’m not shy about it, and I’m not sorry. I have my own opinions on things, and yep, sometimes dear reader, you’re not going to agree with me. I can accept that. Once I write something, a reader is going to respond however they feel. I hit ‘publish’, and the words are no longer my own. I feel good about letting go.

That said, Amanda and I are still fans of Duran Duran. We still  function in the community. Much to the dismay of a select few, we haven’t been burnt at the stake yet, and no – the band hasn’t asked us to stop going to shows. We’re not going anywhere. We not only acknowledge our fandom, we celebrate it every single day when we write, and I think this is where it gets sticky because what Amanda and I see as positive exploration, others find offensive. I guess when it comes down to it, Amanda and I are a bit unusual, if not flat-out weird.

We’re even sometimes embarrassed by our own behavior as fans. I’ve written about those moments MANY, MANY times…but somehow, those blogs are easy to ignore. For those who have already dismissed the blog as being a bunch of lies, or that Amanda and I are evil bitches with an ax to grind, I’d imagine that reading something where we admit to being silly or human doesn’t really fit the agenda.

As I told Amanda last week, sometimes I feel as though the blog has run its course. After eight years, it is a good challenge to find something new to write about. I spend a lot of time writing, when I could be researching or writing one of our own projects. While being a fan is absolutely a joy, writing about fandom is my passion. The blog here is just for fun – which I desperately need at times. That is why I want to continue Daily Duranie.

Keeping with that “fun” theme, I must be careful in the future about how topics are presented here, because fans are so emotionally vested, and naturally biased. Like I said, I think Amanda and I are just kind of weird. We enjoy being fans and doing all the “things”, but we also like examining WHY we do all of the things. We’re not afraid to call ourselves (fans, collectively) out in the process. While I don’t have an answer as to why I am able to compartmentalize (and sometimes I can’t – which is another issue for another day), I need to respect YOUR fan space. Point taken.

-R

James Cole Winery Listening Party, 2015

Do you remember March 28, 2015?  I do. It was a day of envy, pride, joy, and jealousy.

On that date, Duran Duran appeared at a label (Warner Bros) event at James Cole Winery. It was a party designed to schmooze radio personnel and DJs by giving them a taste of Duran Duran circa 2015.  “Pressure Off” was played, and the band spent time working the room alongside label execs.

We fans were treated to a bit of hastily recorded video recorded by cell phone that was widely broadcast by any fan who got hold of the link. We marveled at the song, and wondered what the rest of it might sound like. Most of us would have given our eye teeth and then some to have been in that room.

Honestly, I just wanted to taste the wine.

Ok, not really. I mean, I like Duran Duran alongside a good Cabernet.

I mean listening to Duran Duran while sipping a good cab.

I’d best quit while I’m ahead.

Funny enough, Amanda and I had an idea for a listening party once. We actually had the audacity to think that with social media these days, what the band really needed were the fans. A good way to utilize their ever-loyal fan base these days would be to hold an intimate listening party that was truly an experience for a relatively small fans in a controlled, but very exclusive yet relaxed environment. No one listens to radio these days, and radio doesn’t play new Duran Duran anyway, we thought. They needed a different, and quite frankly better way of reaching their fans on a personal level. Why wouldn’t such an idea work? It would be fairly cheap, but mean the world to the fans, who would then be ready to shout from the rooftops about how great this album was going to be, and do whatever needed done…because that’s how an army of fans work. Look at any artist today, from Taylor Swift down to even Panic at the Disco! – they all USE their fans, and they do it by having events just like what we were thinking of. Wouldn’t it be worth a try?

So we sent off a proposal to the powers that be. It was the first proposal we’d ever written for something like this, and I’m sure we left things out – like how it would profit the label. We were extremely foolish and naive when I think back on it. (In all honesty – nobody at a label cares about fans.  Our feelings about a band or a record do not equate dollar sign…except they really do…but what do I know? I can say this for sure: labels care about money. That’s it. You and I and anyone else who buys a record is purely a dollar sign. They don’t even care about your legs being attached to you unless you use them to buy another song or album!) We should have run a study to show how each person that went to an event like that translates into a certain number of dollars earned for the label. Dollars matter. Fans and loyalty? Who cares!

In my head, that’s the part that everyone in the entire industry is missing…but I digress. The past is the past, and I still have a story to tell.

You can imagine what happened next, but I’ll share it anyway. Our answer to our proposal? Dead silence, from label to management…not even a note of “Gee thanks, but go back to your silly little blog and leave the tough stuff to us.”  Months went by, and then….an announcement of a listening party for radio DJs and music industry people. It sounded far too familiar, even if it wasn’t. Yes, it stung, even if it was purely coincidental.

I’m not accusing anyone of anything here – because it isn’t as though Amanda and I cornered the market on good ideas, or even so-so ideas.  However, I am saying whatever party they had sure didn’t seem to work well.

Out of curiosity, how many times did you hear radio play “Pressure Off” where you live?

My own answer? None. Not even one time, even on radio stations where the band had been interviewed. Invariably they’d have the interview and play an older DD song instead. It was less-than-helpful, or so it seemed. Even the NFL played “Pressure Off” in what I hope was a hefty licensing deal for the band, but not a single radio station in my area ever played it. But does anyone really even listen to radio anymore anyway? My kids tell me no, that they listen to Spotify. (This explains more than I care to know, or explain to my husband about our data usage…)

Granted, maybe having those folks actually play “Pressure Off” on their stations wasn’t the goal. I really don’t know. It would just seem to me that the whole reason for having such an event would be so that they’d be more enticed to play the song, even if the party was more about relationship building than selling an upcoming album. I could be wrong. Admittedly, I’m a layperson. What do I know anyway?

So yes, I remember this date. I remember hearing “Pressure Off” for the first time. I also remember how much pride and joy my heart felt that day, and those feelings mean a lot more than an unanswered idea for a listening party. Live and learn.

-R

 

Watching Over Lucky Clover

The other day Duran Duran tweeted a question about how they celebrate anniversaries of songs, albums, etc. and then asked fans what DD dates they commemorate.  Immediately, I responded about how I like to remember my concert show dates.  In fact, in our homemade Duran calendar, the dates and locations of each show that Rhonda and I have attended, together or separately, is listed.  Today is one of those dates for me.  On this date in 2005, I saw Duran play in Detroit.  It was the last of my spring Astronaut shows and the end of an amazing Spring Break in which I saw five shows that week.  More significantly than that, it was the first show I saw with all five original band members.

At the time of Astronaut’s release, I remember feeling so behind the curve because I had yet to see the Fab Five live.  It seemed so many other people I knew saw all of them in 2003 or 2004.  Unfortunately, that wasn’t in the cards for me so I had to wait until Astronaut.  In December, tickets were purchased and a countdown began.  January and February felt like the longest months ever.  During that time, I kept my excitement about seeing all 5 mostly to myself.  I didn’t want to point out that I wasn’t a cool fan like all those who saw reunion shows.  Then, finally, my part of the tour approached only to find out that Andy had to fly back to the UK to take care of his dad.  Obviously, I understood but was disappointed.  Others around me expressed that while I quietly convinced myself that I would still enjoy the shows, which I did.

By the time the third show came, I stopped hoping that Andy would return.  I reassured myself that this was just one tour and that the band would be back around.  Yet, I was stunned when my friend called the day of the Detroit show telling us that Andy would be there for the show!  I cheered along with my friends and my excitement of the show increased immensely!  Indeed, it was a special show and have a fond little spot in my heart for it.  As I drove home the next day, I found myself feeling very, very lucky to have been able to see the Fab Five live and it didn’t matter that it was in 2005 rather than 2003 or 1984.  I did it.

Speaking of lucky, I believe that I have been a very fortunate Duranie in that I have had the opportunity to see the band live with not only Andy, but Warren once and Dom a bunch of times.  The debate of Duran’s guitarist will probably never die.  While I personally love Duran as it is right now and feel strongly that Dom should definitely be there, I appreciate the history that came with Andy and the creativity that came with Warren.  I know that each guitarist has brought something to Duran that cannot really be measured.  So, on today’s date, I celebrate not only the Detroit show that took place 13 years, but also the guitarists that have been a part of the Duran story.

-A

All You Need is Now, out on CD in 2011

On this date in 2011, All You Need is Now came out on CD…for those of us who still like actual, physical, music to have and hold.

I’m having a difficult time with the idea of that happening seven years ago today. Is that even possible?

I can remember driving down to Best Buy that day. Originally, I wasn’t going to get a copy. I’d already heard the album, I’d already reviewed it, and I didn’t see a point. But the night before, something stirred in me. I had to have that CD! So, I got up in the morning, took my kids to school and made a quick trip down to our local Best Buy.

I searched the shelves, hoping to find the treasure. It was the Best Buy “Exclusive” edition I wanted, and I looked to no avail. There was no way they could have already sold out, so I asked a sales associate to look it up. Sure enough, they’d gotten a whopping three copies in stock. Ok then, where were they, I wondered?  I had two sales people crawling on their hands and knees, going through shipment cases before finally one of them sat back triumphantly with a copy in hand.

I marched over to the cashier and walked out of the store with the last CD I ever purchased at a Best Buy. (I just order off of Amazon now and have it sent to my house if I really want a CD! Yes, I could truly come a hermit if I wanted.)

I know that a great deal has been said about All You Need is Now. Those who once proclaimed its greatness now talk about it as though it was “just” a Rio reboot. I have a tough time seeing it quite so simply. Regardless of what the band and others might say, I love the album. I like that they tried to provide an answer to what Rio or a follow-up might sound like in 2011 – in some sense. I still believe it was the perfect bridge between Red Carpet Massacre and Paper Gods.  And, since I’ve already spent some of my week being unabashedly biased – I like that Dom received writing credit for a lot of it.  So there.

I fell in love with All You Need is Now from the very first listen.  It is an easy album to like, and there are times when I miss that easiness. Sure, technically speaking, Paper Gods is probably a more superior album. I can admit that. However, when it comes to me and my moods – sometimes I just need a little All You Need is Now.

And by the way – there is NOTHING that makes me smile more than when I watch this video. That alone is worth its weight (and mine) in gold.

-R

40-year old anecdotes

The other day, Herald de Paris published an interview with Andy Wickett.  I had seen a great deal of headlines posted by Duranie friends about this piece of work, but I hadn’t read enough of the article to make comment until today.

As a simple introduction for those who may not recognize the name, Andy Wickett was one of the lead singers of Duran Duran prior to Simon. I know, I know, it is difficult to believe that such a time existed. Last year, Mr. Wickett released (the article calls it a “monumental” release. I’m not sure I’d characterize it quite so strongly, but whatever) demos of songs he recorded with Duran Duran prior to Simon.

Funny thing is, I’ve had those demos for probably at least ten years now. I bought them as a bootleg type of thing online, so last year’s monumental release wasn’t exactly new.

In any case, Andy explains that before Duran Duran, he was in a band called TV Eye. There is a little history between TV Eye and Duran Duran, as they shared the same Cheapside squat for a while – I believe one band was upstairs and the other downstairs (or something like that). At the time, Stephen Duffy was the lead singer for Duran Duran, and at some point, he and Stephen basically switched bands. Andy began singing for Duran Duran and Duffy for TV Eye.  According to Wickett, he brought a song with him from TV Eye called “Stevie’s Radio Station”. Duran Duran loved the song, and “Stevie” eventually became “Rio”.

Andy Wickett recalls writing the melody for “Girls on Film” one night, although the lyric that Andy had written it as “Girls IN Film”, which Nick suggested he change.  It was recorded as a demo, which Nick and John later touted to EMI and A&M. According to Andy, both companies loved his voice and wanted more songs like Girls on Film.

At this point though, Andy left the band for “personal reasons”. Upon leaving, he wanted payment for “Girls on Film” since he helped write it, and in turn he was offered £600 if he would sign a waiver, ultimately releasing the band from further payment to Mr. Wickett. He signed the document, and later found out from his attorney that he could not fight and/or win a case for royalties against EMI.

If any of this back history interests you, I would steer you towards John Taylor’s brilliant autobiography, In The Pleasure Groove: Love, Death and Duran Duran. He writes about the band’s entire history, since of course he, along with Nick Rhodes, were the founding members. Best to get the details straight from the person who was there the entire time, I’d say.

However, the point of the article that fascinates me this week, is the claim from Andy that Duran Duran’s managers offered him £10 to give Simon 20 minute lessons – having him sing “Girls on Film”.  He comments in the article that he believes he influenced Duran Duran’s vocal style, since the managers paid him to teach Simon how to sing like him. He says they used a lot of his lyric ideas and song titles such as “Sound of Thunder” and “To The Shore”, and that “they”  influenced the Durans and Stephen Duffy.

He goes on, citing that DD and their management came to see him perform with Xpertz, a reggae band he’d joined after leaving Duran Duran. The Xpertz had a song at the time named “All The President’s Men”, and on Duran Duran’s next album they had a song titled “El Presidente”.  Take that for what you will.

Personally, I hesitate to extol anything as fact from someone whose best memory of being in Duran Duran is “lots of fun white stuff”.  I mean, sure – there was a lot of cocaine during the 80s. John Taylor himself may have mentioned that a time or two. But that’s the best memory he could manage? Not the songs? Not even performing?

The truth is, I have a difficult time with Andy Wickett, not that I’ve ever met him. I know fans who have and swear he’s the sweetest. I’m sure that is true. For me, the dilemma is simple: Andy is someone who could have easily profited heavily from some of the band’s earliest songs. He has intimated in the past that he felt the band knowingly cheated him out of money (never mind that he was not coerced into signing his name on a legally binding waiver, but did so willingly). It is troublesome to attribute everything he shares as fact without considering that he just might have an axe to grind. Regardless of whether truth, nonsense or likely somewhere in between, I cannot forget the entanglements of history when I read some of the things he says in interviews.

There are several people who probably feel as though they’ve been screwed by Duran Duran over the years, for one reason or another. That’s the cost of being in a successful band, I suppose. It also means that many people want their share, and are willing to say whatever it may take to make someone think twice about them and their contributions, however distant or prominent they may have been. I’ve personally seen and heard things from various ex-band members over the years about albums as recent as Paper Gods and All You Need is Now that just seem petty, yet the band still maintains some level of professional decorum with those people. It is something that I don’t know that I could do half as well.

I was not around during the days of TV Eye, Cheapside, or even the Rum Runner. I have no idea if what Andy says about giving Simon vocal lessons is really true – but I suppose anything is possible. If I genuinely thought that Simon would answer me seriously, I might ask. The thing is, at this point—it doesn’t even matter. Simon is the lead singer of Duran Duran, while Andy Wickett is marketing his new album, Creatures of Love, by retelling 40-year old anecdotes.

-R

 

 

I Want a Miracle: making a difference

Just when you think your own problems suck, life has this crazy way of giving you a good kick in the pants. I probably should just say me. Life has a crazy way of giving me a good kick in the pants. The kick was much needed, and probably well-deserved.

I have really cut back on reading Twitter lately. I know that for many, it’s the way they catch their news and sound off on politics. I’ve grown increasingly uncomfortable by the tone of incessant anger on Twitter, so I’ve just stopped reading. I do spend a few moments catching up each morning, but that’s about it. I’m happier that way, but I also miss things on occasion.

The other day as I scrolling through, a tweet caught my eye that I hadn’t seen before. Dom had retweeted something from Fred Rister about an upcoming documentary, as well as a song, “I Want a Miracle”.

First of all, I am betting that some of you are asking, “Who’s Fred Rister?” Have you ever heard of the song, “I Gotta Feeling?” by the Black Eyed Peas?  What about David Guetta?  (If neither of these ring a bell…you need to spend a little QT with Google, Spotify, and maybe even some YouTube.) Fred Rister is a record producer, and he is also a business and writing partner with David Guetta.

I found myself clicking on the video link in the tweet, which took me to a trailer for a documentary on Fred Rister. From listening to what his peers have to say about him, he is not only well-respected, but very loved in the music world. I didn’t know this, but he has cancer. From the way the documentary sounds – he doesn’t have much time left. He is writing, composing and recording “I Want a Miracle” and donating all the proceeds to the Kidney Cancer Association. Mr. Rister wants to see this project through to the end, and I have to applaud him for that. If I were in his shoes, I suspect I’d want to bury my head and hide. He’s far braver than I could ever hope to be.

I’ve watched and listened to the trailer several times now. I don’t know why, really. Granted, “I Gotta Feeling” could probably make anybody dance, including me. I know a little about EDM, primarily because my son Gavin loves it, and of course…there’s Duran Duran, who is responsible for a great many dance remixes out there, and I believe they were and ARE still trailblazers.

And in this case, there’s Dom’s involvement…oh, did I not mention that??  Dom actually plays on “I Want a Miracle”, and if you listen to even the short bits that are included in the background of the trailer, he’s easy to pick out! A few weeks back, Dom tweeted about being in the studio with Fred Rister. I saw the tweet, and as is typical, I marveled at how many people Dom seems to know in the industry. Let’s just say that if he wanted, he could probably leave Duran Duran tomorrow and not be out of a work for a single day. It’s impressive, and so few fans actually see and know that about Dom, assuming that the band is all he has going on. Not so, my friends. Not so.

Even better than knowing he played on the trailer, and the part that really stuck with me, I guess is witnessing the love and respect that Dom and Fred Rister seem to have for one another. Like anyone else on Twitter, I’m just an outsider with my nose pressed to the glass.

Dom retweeted the link to the documentary with these words, “To the bravest person I have ever met, Fred Rister, who continues to fight his cancer with such strength and positivity. I’m so happy to have played on this track. Looking forward to the full length documentary.”

Fred responded, saying “Thank you so much man… I think exactly the same about you, and when you played guitar on “I Want A Miracle “ it was awesome 😱 I allways have our studio session in my mind… Love”.

I mean, come on now! When I read that, I had to go investigate and see what it was all about. Sure, it could have all been play-up in order to draw attention to the release of the song (March 16), but I am not quite that cynical.

So the purpose of my blog today is two-fold: one, I want to everyone reading to buy Fred Rister’s “I Want a Miracle” on Friday. It’s not just about the love for music, although “I Want A Miracle” has a great message, hook and it’s totally danceable with a certain recognizable guitar in its depths… Even better, it is idea that we could do something beneficial and worthwhile. Two, of course I want to support Dom’s work. I do admire his work ethic, talent, and overall sense of gratitude, and yeah – I’ll probably want to punch you in the face if you call me a fangirl or groupie. The truth is, the guy does a TERRIBLE JOB of promoting and marketing himself. So I here I am, doing my (extremely little) bit. I hope it makes a difference on all counts.

If there’s anything our readers should know about me, is that beyond  the music, I love a great story. That’s probably the avid reader and writer in me. I also don’t like being the person “out front”. I would much rather be in the back, unnoticed, just doing my bit to make things work. Yeah, I write this blog four . I occasionally will do videos and host gatherings. I also like being the mom, taking care of people, and just making everything work seamlessly without a lot of fanfare. However, I’m no fool. The Daily Duranie isn’t going to change anybody’s life. It’s not going to suddenly propel anyone’s career—least of all my own—but it might just sell a few more copies of a song and make people feel good about being a fan of something.

That works for me.

-R