Tag Archives: All You Need is Now tour 2011

When all around you earth turns to fire

When it rains, sometimes, it pours.

Last week was a rough week here. First, this very website went down – and not even with a blaze of glory, but with a White Screen of Death (for those unfamiliar). As that was being fixed (no seriously, AS it was being sorted through a flurry of texts), the family truck dies. That was a little closer to a blaze of glory. In fact, it’s still being worked on, and if you’re at all familiar with how much mechanics charge per hour, your jaw has hit your desk or floor. Mine did too when they gave us the estimate.Those two things happened on Sunday. (It was a long week!)

On Monday, our trailer, which was being towed at the time by our now “out-of-commission” truck, had to be retrieved. Another day, another rental car, or truck in this case. I think that was the day we found out just how far this little fix-it job was going to set us back.

On Tuesday night, our microwave died. I don’t know about the rest of you – but we rely on that little appliance a lot. I can deal without a truck (sort of), but the microwave? Come on now.

On Wednesday morning, I came downstairs to find a small mess around and near my coffee maker. I assumed that when I poured the water in to the machine the night before, I missed and didn’t notice. Nope. The coffee maker has a leak. Seriously???

Later on that day, I also found out that my last living uncle on my dad’s side passed away. My uncle Joe was 92 and had lived a long, full life. Like my father, he was Sicilian, and the family tales of his possible-Mafia involvement were semi-legendary. We never knew for sure, because he kept those cards very close to his chest (and I appreciate that simply because I didn’t want to be involved). However, I will say one thing about my uncle: he was the one person (after my dad died), I could call if I needed help. I knew and trusted that about him, even if I did not see him regularly. He lived in Florida and each year we exchanged Christmas cards. He’d tell me he was coming out that summer, and I’d smile, knowing that there was no way he’d make it. He meant well, and most of all – he was the last vestige of family I had left on my dad’s side. I will miss having that little bit of comfort. I think I’m still coming to terms with what it means and how I feel, particularly because I didn’t have time to really process it because of what I’m about to share next.

Next was Thursday. The piece de resistance to the week was coming home to find Walt’s rental car sitting next to the curb. As soon as I pulled into the driveway, I knew. I always do. I gathered my things, took a deep breath, ushered my youngest into the house and asked, “Were you laid off?”, already knowing what the answer would be.  “Yep.” , was the reply, coming from the kitchen.

Awesome

In the US – we say “laid off”, elsewhere you might call it “being made redundant.” In other words, he is now unemployed, which is a disaster with two kids in college who both need their tuitions paid this month.

What a WEEK.

So forgive me again for waxing nostalgic, as I take a minute or more to remember back to a much happier time. On this date in 2011, I saw Duran Duran in Glasgow, Scotland.

I don’t know that I’d say I’ve done a lot of traveling outside of the US. I feel lucky to be able to say I’ve done a little, that trip to Glasgow being a highlight. Many American people that I know or grew up with have never been outside of the country at all. To give the tiniest bit of insight, I think my parents were pretty average people. My dad had a white-collar job, but it wasn’t terribly high paying, and my mom was a secretary once she went back to work when I was about ten. We had most things we needed, but very few things that we really wanted, I think.

Vacations were a luxury, and the most we ever did for a family vacation was go camping – and that didn’t happen until I was in high school. Until then, my parents would take a two-week vacation from work each summer, but we didn’t really go anywhere, and that was not unusual for the parents of my friends, either. I flew on a plane with my parents exactly once, and that was to go up to the bay area to see family one Thanksgiving.  My dad considered flying to be a luxury, and not one we could readily afford. I had aunts, uncles and cousins – siblings of my father and their children, as well as the same on my mom’s side – that I never met because they lived across the country from us. I didn’t travel outside of California until I took a special trip to Washington DC in 8th grade, and after that I didn’t go on a plane again until I was well into college.

The idea of traveling to see a band is still pretty “out there” to many people, I guess. My friends from high school are surprised when they see my posts, not because I go to see a band (they’re used to that part now!) but because I’ve gone some crazy places to do it. One of my friends commented that the farthest she’s gone from home has been to Arizona, which is where she lives now. That’s pretty shocking to ME. There’s an entire world out there to explore, and yet a lot of the people I know would be satisfied to just see the capital of our country. That is why when I say the US is a big place and many people don’t travel outside of their general area, I say it with confidence.

So for more, one of the shows I’m most excited to be able to say I attended, was Glasgow. We weren’t even really supposed to be there! It wasn’t a part of our original plan at all, but when these tickets came up, Amanda and I agreed we should just do it. We took a train from Birmingham into Glasgow, which in and of itself was a fantastic trip. Then we stayed with Amanda’s friend in Edinburgh, and even spent time in that city before going to Glasgow for the show. I loved every minute of it. The winter markets, seeing ice and snow on the ground (yes, I’m from California and to me that’s a novelty!), going to a Scotch club and just walking around – memories I will keep forever.

And then there was the show.

It was our last show on that little mini-tour, and while I know the band likely had no idea who we were (Except for Dom – by then he was probably concerned I’d never go home!), I would swear they played with extra energy that night. Hungry Like the Wolf was ridiculous, as John and Dom came right to center stage and played off of one another. Amanda and I nearly had strokes! I reveled in the show, turning around to watch the crowd clap and respond. To say I enjoyed myself would be an understatement. I didn’t think I’d ever be able to top the experience I had at that Glasgow show.

So, when things are down, like right now, I tend to think about those moments. I don’t know if anything like that can ever happen again. I’d like to think so because otherwise, it’s all pretty hopeless, but you never know. I treasure the memories.

The other day I was chatting with someone online, and they mentioned that the nicest people they knew from the US were those who had traveled abroad. I understand what they meant by this. It is very easy to remain complacent and somewhat naive about the world we live in when we aren’t able to see HOW one another actually lives, There are a plethora of reasons for this, but I think when we rely solely on media for our information, it is very easy to make assumptions without verifying using our own eyes and experiences. My own eyes were opened much wider after my first visit abroad, and every time I get the chance to go somewhere new, I learn more.

I don’t know about the rest of you, but I’m hoping for a better week!

-R

I’ll Hold On To the Memory

This morning, good ole Facebook reminded me of what I was doing and where I was six years ago today through the following picture:

Duran Duran in Birmingham - Tweet
Our infamous tweet before the show in Brume

Yes, six years ago today, Rhonda and I were seeing Duran Duran play at the LG Arena in Birmingham, England.  Funny enough, every time I think about it, I have to pinch myself to remind me that this really did, indeed, happen.  Looking back at that show and that tour, two big ideas come to mind.  First, the phrase “all you need is now” pops up, the idea of just living in the moment.  Then, there is the significance of that trip and place for my personal fandom.

In 2011, we went to the UK twice.  Of course, the first trip, in May, did not go as planned to say the least.  Simon lost his voice and the shows we held tickets for were canceled.  We pushed through, made the best of the situation, and ignored the worry that we had seen the end of Duran.  Thus, when the shows were rescheduled, we didn’t hesitate to jump at the chance to go back.  Looking back on that decision, I cannot remember pondering the decision very long.  I  didn’t debate the pros and cons of doing another UK trip.  Normally, when shows are announced, I go through the internal checklist.  Is the date one in which I can attend?  If it is during the school year, can I take off?  Do I have the money to go?  Will someone be around to check in on the cat?  That time, though, those questions weren’t really even asked.  We leaped before we looked, definitely.

Was that wise of us?  Probably not.  After all, I had struggled with work to be able to go the first time.  Then, during the same month of the trip, I had the chance to go to an Obama White House holiday party.  Would I be able to do both?  I assumed that I would for some crazy reason.  In hindsight, everything worked out and worked out easily.  It wasn’t anything like the struggle I had in May to be able to go.  Was I lucky?  Beyond.  It almost felt like it was meant to be.

What lesson did I learn from this trip?  The message I received, I think, is that, at times, I just have to go with my gut.  I shouldn’t think everything to death or assume that it cannot or should not happen.  When there is an opportunity for something amazing, I gotta go with it.  I am all for having responsibilities and being responsible, but…  (Seriously, people who know me know that I’m hyper responsible.  Is that from teaching for over 20 years?  Maybe.  Campaigning for political candidates?  Possibly.)  Was it super weird for me not to think about my obligations?  Yes, but it is good for me–not only to be able to enjoy some crazy good times but also to let myself live a little.

Both trips meant a great deal to me.  On the first trip with the canceled shows, I gained an insight into the band and my fandom that I would not have had otherwise.  Rhonda and I had to make the best out of an extremely disappointing situation.  While I don’t know that I would say that it was the most fun, it was the most eye-opening.  The extra time meant that we could walk around Birmingham and get a real sense of where the band came from.  That humanized them in a way that I didn’t think possible.  They were no longer just celebrities but people, humans.  This idea was reinforced by seeing them outside of their studio when they were open about the situation and how they were feeling about it.  I felt honored to have been there.

Fast forward almost 7 months later and the dream was finally fulfilled.  We got to see the band play in their hometown.  I still get goosebumps just thinking about it.  While the show was not the best I had ever been to, it was monumental to me.  As a kid, I remember thinking about how exotic Birmingham sounded to me.  My family was not well off and any vacations we took typically took us to a nearby state, if that.  We never traveled by plane (I took my first flight at 17!) and I didn’t know anyone who went overseas.  So Birmingham sounded so unusual to me.  I couldn’t even imagine what it was like and I never expected to find myself there once, forget about more than once.  What did I discover about the city?  It really felt like a lot of the industrial northern cities here do.  As someone who grew up in the south side of Chicago, it felt almost familiar.  I realized that I actually liked it and would love to spend more time there, which is not what I expected at all.

Six years have gone by.  My fandom grew stronger from those trips.  One thing is certain.  I’ll hold on to those memories for the rest of my life.

-A

Duran Duran at Brighton Centre, 2011

I am apologizing, but I don’t think there’s ever going to be a year when I don’t take a second to fondly remember the first time I saw Duran Duran on UK soil. Self-indulging?

ABSOLUTELY.

That’s the thing, this is a fan blog. It is myblog. It’s totally self-indulging. So I’m doing it.

On this day in 2011, Duran Duran played the Brighton Centre in a very windy Brighton. I can remember walking back from the venue to the hotel, the wind had quite a bite to it that night! I don’t even know why Amanda and I tried to do that – it was very clear we were going to get lost from the onset, which we did. Thank goodness we found a cab, otherwise we might still be wandering around Brighton, or blown out to sea! I loved traveling to Brighton along with other parts of England and Scotland, and I will never be sorry I went. Not even for a moment.

I still can’t quite believe Duran Duran broke out “Secret Oktober” that night. I’m forever grateful. After all the crap we went through to get there, it was such a wonderful moment and lived up to every possible expectation I could have had, and then some. I stood there pinching myself through half the show. I don’t know when I’ll have the opportunity to go back to the UK (and if I do go, whether or not I can be convinced to come back home!!), but I encourage anyone and everyone who has the chance to go. I had my own experiences, but the fact is – traveling changes ones view of the world. Even if that just means traveling from one state to another, I believe it makes a difference.

Our world is such a crazy and different place now, six years later. I am just thankful for the opportunities I’ve had and the friends I’ve made along the way. It is good to take the time to think back, not just because I had a uniquely wonderful experience, but because I’m grateful. That trip changed my view of a lot of things, not just about the band but regarding my life in general. So sure, for those who want to see the negative – yep, I’m bragging. For the people who really matter, they know that trip, along with the one earlier that year was a life-changer, and quite possibly saved me.  I am grateful.

So, who was in Brighton Centre loving every second of “Secret Oktober” with me that night?? Anyone??

-R

My ten moments of joy

Amanda asked that I share ten fandom moments. So far, I’ve written down nine. Number ten is harder for me to put a finger on, but I’m going with what I’ve got for now!

These are moments of complete inner-joy. Oddly, they aren’t necessarily times directly in front of a single band member or anything like that.  Flittering seconds of sheer happiness, in a very uncertain world.

Childhood

I don’t have many vivid memories I can share as a preteen Duranie, but there is one that sticks out. It was the very first time I saw a Duran Duran video, and it was at my friend’s house. I am pretty sure it was during Friday Night Videos, on the ABC network. I don’t know if “Hungry Like the Wolf” had been out a while, or if this was really the premier (I doubt it?), but I can remember sitting on my knees on the floor, in front of her TV set that night. It seemed like forever before they announced that video was coming up next, but I can remember squealing and wiggling, as if to settle in. I could barely sit still, and then it started. I’m pretty sure my mouth fell open as soon as it began. It was so hard to catch every last detail. I wanted to watch it over and over again, but of course I couldn’t—she didn’t have a VCR then (only one of those huge laser disc players). We screamed, in excitement and in frustration when it was over. Although I’d already seen the band in pictures, there was something so unique and special about seeing a video. For a long time, I wanted to believe that the people in the video were just as they were in person. I suppose that’s where the whole idea of putting the band on a pedestal developed. Even so, those videos helped to fuel my fandom for many years—I didn’t see the band live until 1989—so videos were easily even MORE important to me than the live shows, back then.

Anaheim House of Blues, March 2001

I can remember the exact moment my fandom took a complete 180 degree turn back towards the band, and it was at this very show. Up until then, I falsely believed fandom was a thing for pre-teens. The band took the stage, and I recognized I was sharing actual breathing space with Simon Le Bon. Once that happens, there’s really no hope, is there? 😀

Sharing my fandom story at the Friends of Mine Convention

I have never been quite as proud as I was the evening I stood up, took the microphone, and shared my own fandom “truth”. It was a little bit speech, a whole lot of heart and soul shared that night. Never before had I felt like part of a group. That feeling fueled me for months, if not years after.

A little walk around Cheapside, Brighton, UK.

Some people go to England for vacation. Others, to follow a rock band on tour. Me? I go so that a rock band cancels their entire tour and I’m left to figure it all out.  Amanda and I suddenly found ourselves with nine days to fill in a country we had never been to before, in a city that we’d already been warned was “the pit” of England by the lovely man at Heathrow who inspected our passports. What do you think we did? We walked as much of Birmingham as we could! Our walk included the Cheapside area, which most fans know as the austere, initial “home”, of Duran Duran.  Seeing where the band began provided me with an entirely different view of where they sit now.  “Joyful” doesn’t quite cover my feeling that day. I will never be sorry I boarded that plane, no matter how many shows were canceled.

Valley Center, CA

This was the first show I attended when the band resumed touring that year. It was hard not to burst into tears the moment the band took the stage that night, but I didn’t. Instead I stared at the floor while “Before the Rain” played. I didn’t dare even sneak a peek at Simon. I had gone to the show with my husband, who thinks he gets my fandom, but he doesn’t. He would have half-dragged me out of there had I broken down in tears, and yet I could feel them all in my throat as I heard him sing each note. Eventually, I dared myself to look up, because really—what was I going to do, stare at the floor the whole night? I looked up and met the gaze of not only Dom, but Simon too. It was simultaneously awful and kind of beautiful because I think they knew what I was feeling. Maybe.

Later that same year…

Not quite seven months later, Amanda and I went to Brighton. In and of itself that’s a story, but the moment of pure joy came for me when Nick played the opening chords to my favorite B-side, “Secret Oktober”.  If I hadn’t been so firm on my rule of no crying, the flood gates would have opened that night for sure. The culmination of thirty some-odd years of fandom, flooding to the surface.

Later, in Birmingham

In my opinion, this wasn’t the best show of the four I attended in England 2011, but to be standing in DD’s hometown watching them was simply amazing. I’ll never forget. Pure, unadulterated joy.

And still later in Glasgow!

Yes, a lot of my pure joy was found in England. In Glasgow, I ended up in second row at the front of the stage. The show blew my mind, but turning around at the beginning of “The Man Who Stole a Leopard” and watching the entire arena clap their hands overhead made me see how significantly SMALL of a part I play in this fandom. We all do. My heart still swells at the thought.

Durandemonium

I really enjoy seeing our community come together.  I especially enjoy seeing the community come together and thoroughly enjoy themselves, knowing that I played a tiny part in making it happen. Durandemonium was that for me. I still think about the committee of people who helped make it happen, mistakes I made, and things I would do better if possible. I also think about the successes of that weekend, and I’m proud of just having the audacity to even try.  Seeing everyone that weekend – well, that WAS pure joy.

And then there’s the bit where, after the last shuttle bus picked up the final revelers at the Late Bar and dropped everyone at the Amalfi Hotel, Amanda and I locked arms, and ran in the other direction away from the hotel! We went and got a very late-night breakfast.  Sometimes, even fandom needs a break.

Agua Caliente, March 2017

I’m not going to exaggerate – my “journey” with this band has been weird. I didn’t even think I would go to shows this year, much less see  four. I think because of that reason, I had no expectations beyond getting some sun and having fun with my friends. As a rule, I’m uptight and I know it. Stress is always just below the surface, and I let dumb things get to me and STAY with me. So, my plan was just to have fun. I did. Standing in front of the band that night made me see just how much fun I really have with them. They make me happy, and no one should ever be able to take your bliss away.

So those are my ten. I threw the last one in there just under the wire because when it comes down to it, Duran Duran is my bliss. Every time I see them, there is joy. I’m learning not to let the small things take that away.

-R

 

 

Amanda’s Five Joyful Moments of Fandom

A couple of weeks ago, I blogged about an idea I had. This idea was a simple one–that I was going to take time to think about moments when I experienced real joy, related to my fandom. These moments might happen when the band is around and they might occur when they are not around. The idea was to acknowledge those times when I stopped for a second or two, looked around and realized that, in that moment, I was truly happy. Those moments might not be big or small and they might not have been perfect but something was happening that made my heart feel full. I have taken some time in the last two weeks to think of these moments. Some of them I knew right away and others took longer to pop into my head. Here are five of those moments, in no particular order. I’m certain that there were more but I’m going with these. Then, next week, I’ll share five more.

1. Singing Hungry Like the Wolf at Howl at the Moon on Bourbon Street in New Orleans in September 2004.
This moment happened on the second night of the Friends of Mine Convention.  At the time of the convention, I had just returned to the Duran fandom and felt like I had taken a huge risk in going to this convention. After all, I had never traveled for fandom before and didn’t really know anyone except for the person who went with me. I knew that this would be a moment that would either cause my fandom to grow or to fade. Luckily for me, I had an absolute blast and met so many amazing people, including Rhonda. It was a turning point, indeed. While I didn’t know that at the time, I knew that I was having an absolutely amazing time when we were at the piano bar, Howl at the Moon. We had finally convinced them to play some Duran and there we were, late at night, singing loudly and proudly to Hungry Like the Wolf. I felt like I had found my people.

2. Secret Oktober in Brighton in November 2011.
As many of you know, Rhonda and I flew to the UK in the spring of 2011 to see Duran play in their home country, only to have the shows canceled on us due to Simon’s lost vocal range. At the time of that trip, both of us felt fairly certain that the band was done and Simon would never sing again. Of course, we didn’t dare utter that thought from fear that it would be true. Thus, when the band was able to perform again, we didn’t hesitate to go back, to try it again. Brighton was our first show of that tour, which will always make it magical but when we heard the first notes to Secret Oktober, it transcended even that. Rhonda and I looked at each other in shock and awe before hugging like goofs and turning our attention back to the stage. Magical, indeed.

3. Agua Caliente show in March 2017.
This has been a tough year for me and it was especially tough in those first couple of months. One reason was that Rhonda and I weren’t communicating as we normally do. We felt distant from each other and I desperately fretted that our friendship was slowly dying. When the shows at Agua Caliente were announced, I knew that I had to go. I figured it might either be my last tour or it would turn things around. Both shows were amazing but the second night, up front, felt like everything was right again. At the end of the show, I posted the following on my personal Facebook, “The truth is that I love this band more than I can say. I can’t imagine never seeing them again. They bring me joy…” Indeed.

4. Laughing hysterically at Tempo Cafe in Chicago in March 2005.
While the convention in 2004 brought me my people, the spring Astronaut tour made Rhonda and I touring partners for life. We saw two shows that weekend in Chicago and Milwaukee. After the second show, we ended up needing food and caffeine at like five in the morning. Tempo Cafe was the only place in downtown Chicago that we knew was open twenty-four hours a day. After waiting for forever to get a seat, once we got our food, Rhonda and I could not stop laughing. I have no idea what the heck was so funny but we laughed and laughed and laughed until tears were flowing. I knew then that when we get together, laughter will always follow.

5. Hail storm in Brompton Cemetery in London in May 2011.
When Rhonda and I went to the UK for shows that did not happen, we promised ourselves that we would not just sit around and feel sorry for ourselves. We were going to make lemonade out of lemons. Thankfully, friends took sympathy on us and gave us some info on where some Duran landmarks are located, including Brompton Cemetery, the one featured in the All You Need Is Now video. We spent one day following this mini-tour, including stopping by the very cool cemetery. The funny part is that every time we got near a Duran specific place, it would thunder and rain like you would not believe. We wondered if the gods were trying to tell us something. By the time we hit the cemetery, we were ready for whatever. Whatever is what we got. No sooner had we entered through the gate when it started to storm. This storm included some significant hail. We ran until we found shelter, laughing all the way, as we were certain that we looked like drowned rats.

Now that I have five of my fandom moments that have brought me joy, I ask that all of you do the same.  I want to read everyone’s very cool moments related to their fandom.  I guarantee that my week will be better off because of them.  Then, next week, I will share five more to round out my ten joyful fandom moments.

-A

 

Wrightegaarden, Norway 2011–Do you Remember?

Do you remember 2011?  I can barely remember it myself. Actually, even yesterday feels like a struggle right now, much less 2011….but I’ll try.

On this date in 2011, Duran Duran was scheduled to play Wrightegaarden in Norway. (We know that there are more than a few fans out there that might remember this)  Unfortunately, the band had to cancel, and yes, this was included in the set of dates canceled due to Simon’s vocal problems during the All You Need is Now tour.

Even sadder, the band has not made it back to Norway since. We can only hope that the band will in fact return there – maybe for the 4th anniversary celebration. Right about now, it seems easier to fantasize about what the band might do and where they might go to celebrate than thinking about real life. The sky is the limit, as they say. Reality comes later, but for now, we can hope.

-R

Question of the Day: Thursday, July 7, 2017

I apologize for yesterday’s video mix-up.  I thought I was so cool that I posted the question of the day from a bus on the way to the airport in the dark at 5 am.  Alas, I apparently copied the wrong link.

Let’s try it again with the right clips!  Which live version of Wild Boys do you like better:  2011 All You Need Is Now Tour or 2015 Paper Gods Tour?