Tag Archives: Electric Barbarella

Electric Barbarella amongst the #MeToo movement

Day two from Santa Barbara. Last night we took a drive to see a couple of homes we like, and we were able to cross a couple of others off of our list of favorites. I think that if we threw caution to the wind, we’d have our answer….but I’m not quite ready to do that just yet, so today will bring more looking around. If nothing else, it’s lit a fire under me to get our current house on the market!

On to more important things, like Duran Duran. (Right?!?) Does anyone remember What Unfolds? What if I gave you the name, Steve Aoki? Terminal Five? How about champagne and cake?? Well, if you were there, tomorrow is in fact your sixth anniversary of making it out alive. I would have mentioned this tomorrow, but it is also someone’s birthday, and that needs to take precedence. So, happy early anniversary to those of you who survived the insanity at Terminal Five. (Sounds like a great book title, in my opinion!)

Today also has an anniversary of sorts. On this date in 1997, the filming for “Electric Barbarella” wrapped up, and Pop Trash was also released on this date in the UK.

I don’t know if I’m alone here, but I’ve always had misgivings about “Electric Barbarella”, in particular the video…but the song as well. Cheeky as though it may be, when I watch the video, I can’t help but cringe. An electric Barbie, bought off of a floor, to do anything and everything the men want. A problem arises only when the doll starts thinking on her own. Music video or not, it’s cringe-worthy even by 1997 standards, but certainly more so today, in the shadow of the #MeToo movement. It is hard for me to defend the merit of “Electric Barbarella”. I always felt the content was anti-female, and I couldn’t help but wonder why on earth a band who was loved by so many women would put out a song (not to mention a video) like that. Maybe I missed something somewhere.

I don’t know that the intention of music videos created back in 1997 were necessarily a call to arms to fight injustice or to make any kind of a social statement. Maybe some were, but I can’t think of them off-hand. I’m sure someone out there will have great examples.  I can’t help but think about Childish Gambino’s recent video for “This is America”. There’s nothing lighthearted or joyful going on there. It is a powerful, social statement, from song lyrics to one of the first images in the video where a man is savagely shot from behind while sitting in a chair. The scene is disturbing and stays with you, but even more so when you continue watching and notice that the point of the video is not necessarily the violence or injustice itself – it is that while all of that goes on, no one else pays any attention. As alarming and shocking as the video might seem, the portrayal of America is disgustingly accurate. I don’t know about anyone else, but it is a tough video for me to watch. Art can be like that, and yes – I do believe it is art. I had a long discussion with my oldest about the video when she insisted I watch it. Instead of being disturbed by the graphic nature, she was thrilled that in 2018, artists are being encouraged to really be so open and honest.

It is funny, and by funny I mean very strange and slightly discomforting, that back when I was her age, I felt the same way. I have to wonder what the future will bring.

In contrast to “This is America”, “Electric Barbarella” at least seems to be the epitome of the throwaway 1990s culture. Bright colors, animated graphics, shallow, plastic and pretty.  It is hard to see past the facade…and I admit that I just can’t seem to find what the real message is, if in fact there is anything going on there to be seen. My question to you is simple – what do you think the band was really trying to convey? Do you like the video or the message, and does it still have a place in 2018 amidst #MeToo?

-R

Electric Barbarella finishes filming in 1997

I feel free!  Summer may now begin! Now that the graduation festivities are over and I have another high school graduate on my hands, I’m ready.

It felt really good to see Gavin cross the stage and get his diploma on Saturday, and I’m really thankful that most of my family was there to see it, including my brother-in-law, who spent quite a bit of time in the hospital recently. He’s doing really well though, and we have great hopes that he’ll receive the bone marrow transplant he needs in the coming months. Until then, we treasure whatever time we have together.

Next on the summer “fun” list is Gavin’s 18th birthday, and then 4th of July, which is my favorite holiday, and then I pick Amanda up from the airport for an extended weekend of fun and road tripping to the bay area. I’m excited to see the shows, but I’m also really looking forward to not being in a hurry to get from one place to the next. We are leaving early enough to have time to ourselves, and the same holds true for on the way home. I am hoping it will feel like a real getaway rather than a race, even though the two shows are GA.  We may be waiting in line, but hopefully we will be amongst friends and have a good time chatting the weekend away. I’m not going to think much beyond that because I want to savor every moment.

So, for today – I have a moment in history to think about. On this date in 1997, filming for video for “Electric Barbarella” was completed.

I never really fell in love with this video, and I think it’s one of the pieces that really tends to stir up a fair amount of controversy amongst fans. The woman is a robot, looks an awful lot like Barbie, and the song lyrics are enough to make you wonder just what is meant by the song. Is it all just for fun, or is there another message?

-R

 

Electric Barbarella over Sunrise??

I enjoy setting up the question of the day on this blog because I like doing the polls myself and I learn from them.  This week, I noticed an interesting result.  As probably most of you know we have been asking about video preferences.  While we had asked this question before, we haven’t done so since the most recent videos from Paper Gods came out.  Generally, I feel like I have a sense of which videos Duranies prefer.  For example, I expect New Moon on Monday to be popular based on previous surveys, word of mouth, etc.  Earlier this week, I asked which video people preferred between Sunrise and Electric Barbarella,  Interestingly enough, Electric Barbarella won by a LOT.  In fact, more people voted in that poll than the rest of the week’s combined.  What’s up with that and which video do I prefer and why?

Do Duranies really prefer the video for Electric Barbarella over the video for Sunrise?  I’m not really sure despite the result of the poll.  Obviously, the verdict was decided by the people who voted and not all Duranies vote on this site.  If I asked again, I wonder if I would get the same result.  What if I asked in a different way or with different fans?  What if I went to Facebook groups and asked or busted out the question on message boards?  Anyway, I have to wonder why we had so many more votes that day and why for Electric Barbarella.

Let’s take a moment to watch that video before I add my thoughts about this video:

All right, I’m just going to say it.  I don’t like this video.  I might even go so far as to say that I really dislike it.  It is definitely one of my least favorite Duran Duran videos.  (Don’t send hate mail.  I can be a fan and not like one video.)  I won’t lie.  It isn’t even a favorite song of mine.  While I appreciated the connection to Barbarella and to the band’s history, it isn’t enough for me.  Some of you might say that my dislike for both the song and video probably has something to do with the lack of John Taylor.  I’m sure that you might be somewhat right.  That said, I like Out of my Mind (the song mostly) and that doesn’t have John.

While the song doesn’t cut it for me, the video is WAY worse.  If this was the only video that I saw from Duran, I would not be a fan.  First of all, the video is too predictable.  It feels to me that it is follows the song too precisely.  The viewer isn’t forced to think or ponder anything as it is all spelled out.  I’m also not a fan of the premise.  Here’s a “woman” that can be bought and then directed to do whatever via a remote control.  Of course, I realize that it is a “robot”.  Still, the message is too close to objectification of women and that makes me uncomfortable.  Some of you might be pointing out that Duran often uses women in their videos.  That’s true.  I don’t find most of those women to be seen as objects.  The woman of Rio, for example, holds the power over the guys.  Even the women of the Chauffeur aren’t objects. One might even argue that they don’t need men at all.  Some might say that the models of Girls on Film show how awful models in real life can be treated.  I think the use of women and how they are shown can be explained, for the most part, in their videos except for Electric Barbarella.

Sunrise is very different.  Let’s watch that video to compare:

As you might imagine, I really like this one.  I don’t know that I would say that it is one of my ultimate favorites but I enjoy the heck out of it.  I love that the focus is the band.  It tells the story of each member traveling to come back together.  The storyline is not obvious but fits not only the song but what was happening with the band at the time.      Yes, I also appreciate that it featured the Fab Five, too.  It wasn’t just Simon, Nick and Warren like Electric Barbarella.  It also captures a part of the band’s history with the reunion.

I have a few questions remaining.  First, am I the only one who likes the Sunrise video over Electric Barbarella?  Am I the only one who finds the video for Electric Barbarella a little distasteful?  Then, if I am not the only one who prefers Sunrise, what do you make of the vote showing a vast majority favoring the other?  I guess one thing is true.  The Duran Duran fan community never ceases to amaze me or make me think.

-A

Medazzaland Facts and Stats

I have to apologize for the lateness of today’s blog.  I have been completely swamped with trying to complete a lot of grading while writing new curriculum.  I hoped to get to this earlier today but…well, you can see how well my plans are going.  Anyway, last weekend, I took time to evaluate the first of the three albums that Duran Duran has released in the month of October.  That album, of course, was Big Thing and that blog you can read here.  Today, I’ll give some facts and statistics about Medazzaland released in 1997.  In later blogs, I’ll look at Astronaut and the albums released in November.

Medazzaland Facts:
Released October 14, 1997 in North America, Japan, Brazil and Argentina but never released physically in Europe.
Produced by TVMania and Syn Pro Tokyo.  (It appears to me then as it was mostly produced by the band.)
There were 12 tracks on the album.

Singles:

  1. Out of My Mind
    Released: 27 March 1997
  2. Electric Barbarella
    Released: 16 September 1997

Peak Chart Position:

  1.  Out of My Mind peaked at #21 in the UK
  2. Electric Barbarella peaked at #52 in the US

Personnel:

As I’m sure you all know, the band at this time was just Simon, Nick and Warren.  A fact that you might not know, though, is that Warren played bass on the tracks that John did not.  Anyway, others filled in to complete the album including:

  • John Taylor – bass (tracks 1, 2, 7, and 11)
  • Steve Alexander – live drums (tracks 1, 2, 5, 7)
  • Anthony J. Resta – live drums (tracks 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12), additional production, mixing and programming
  • Dave DiCenso – live drums (track 4)
  • Tim Garland – treated soprano sax solo (track 9)
  • Talvin Singh – tabla and santoor (track 4)
  • Jake Shapiro – cello (track 10)
  • Sally Stapleton – background vocals (track 2)
  • Madeleine Farley – background vocals (track 6)
  • Mayko Cuccurullo – ultra high vocal fx (track 1)

Videos:

They did complete two videos from this album, for both singles:

Out of My Mind:

Electric Barbarella:

EPK (Electronic Press Kit:

Touring:

The Ultra Chrome, Latex and Steel Tour began in November of 1997 in the Northeast United States.  They traveled throughout the US and Canada.  At the end of that tour, they did a tribute show and a special show to launch SKY Digital TV in the UK.  In December 1998, they did the Latest and Greatest Tour in the UK before returning to the US in the fall of 1999.  The end of 1999 saw a mini-tour, Overnight Sensation, in Ireland, the UK, the US, and Chile.  Here are a couple of clips to show off those tours:

Beyond all of these facts, many Duranies have strong feelings about this album.  For many, it represents when John Taylor left the band or when some really stopped paying attention.  For others, it equaled heavy involvement as the band seemed more accessible.  Many loved the experimental music while others have yet to buy a copy or listen to it all the way through.  Next weekend, I’ll share my thoughts on the album.  Until then, I would love to hear your thoughts or experiences about the Medazzaland album and era.

-A