Category Archives: Uncategorized

Can You Taste the Summer?

The school year is finally finished.  It was definitely one of the longest school years of my career and one of the toughest.  I know that I probably say that every year but this year was different.  Tougher.  Harder.  Let’s just say that I have cried more in the last couple of weeks than I have in months over it all.  Even as I try to celebrate the end, I find myself exhausted, both mentally and emotionally.

All of that said, today I am leaving for a family vacation of sorts.  I’m flying with my parents to Boston to see my brother who lives there.  The best part is that my dad will get a big surprise once we arrive which I’m so looking forward to.  It has been a very tough year for him, too.  Needless to say, I need a break.  There is nothing quite like getting a change of scenery to clear one’s head.  This trip will be good for me.

I made a decision that isn’t typical for me.  I’m taking a real break during this family trip.  I won’t be blogging tomorrow.  I don’t want to deal with any responsibilities even ones that I love.  Instead, I want to focus on the time with the family.  My carry on will be lighter without this laptop.  On top of tomorrow’s blog, I will also be taking a break from doing the question of the day.  So, the blog will be silent on Sunday.  I assume that Rhonda will blog like normal on Monday.  Then, I’ll be back with the question of the day on Thursday and my weekend blogs on Friday.  I think the complete break from everything will be good for me.  I need it.

Part of me feels guilty for this.  The question of the day doesn’t take a long time to do.  The blog should publish something daily, part of me says.  The other part of me says that I deserve to take some time to have a short break.  It will be fine.  On that note, I’m off to  the airport.  See you all on Thursday!

-A

The Next Line: Should a band move on?

Duran Duran is my most favorite band. But there are other bands I also love and adore, and like more than a few Duranies out there – Spandau Ballet is on that list.

Up until a few years ago, I’d never seen Spandau live. I’d always wanted to, but timing (I grew up just a couple of years too late), and their own break-up made that pretty impossible until 2015. But the wait was worth it. I didn’t go all-out for tickets in the same way many of my friends did, traveling all over the country to see them, but I did see them a few times that year. And each time I saw them, the show seemed tighter, the band seemed more on fire, and I was thoroughly convinced that it wouldn’t be the last I’d see of them onstage together.

The end of the tour arrived, and not terribly long after, Spandau announced that Tony Hadley, their lead singer, would not return. He had his own plans for a solo career, and he was apparently satisfied with what he’d accomplished with Spandau Ballet. All good things must come to an end; out with the old, in with the new, and so on, right?

But what about the band? Many long time Spandau fans felt like Tony’s departure meant the band should also come to an end. I can’t tell you how many times I read that Tony’s voice is what made the band Spandau Ballet.

Actually, yes I can give an approximation of how many times I read that – just imagine the same happening in Duran Duran, and you’ll know exactly how often it’s been written.

I understand where those fans are coming from. There’s no denying that Tony’s voice is important to the sound we recognize as Spandau Ballet. If it were Simon and Duran Duran we were talking about, the very same could be said, and we’d all nod our heads in agreement. Yes, I’d also argue that the guitar, drums, bass and even sax are important parts, but the voice is the voice.

But there is another side to this story, and that’s of the band. Those other guys. There are many who feel like they’re worthy of some importance. I am firmly in that camp, whether we are talking about Spandau, or even Duran Duran. (yes, I said it) Is it fair for one person to call the shots for the entire group? Is it right that one individual decides the destiny for everyone else? Spandau vowed that this wouldn’t break them, and that they would return.  While I knew that in the moment they probably did mean every last word – I wasn’t so sure The Next Line would actually come to them . It’s one thing to be indignant and insist a group can move on, it’s another to actually do it.  I was supportive, but silently doubtful.  Let’s just say I was thankful I saw them live when I did, just in case.

All was fairly quiet until yesterday, when a curious email hit my inbox. Spandau Ballet sent an email….and yes my friends, they are about to write The Next Line. I silently cheered at my desk. They have a new, yet to be announced lead singer, and they are not only announcing their return, they’re playing a show in London at the Subterania on June 6th. Tickets go on sale tomorrow at 10am GMT. They will sell out in a flash, and I desperately wish I could be there.

As any fan might, I wanted to see the reaction from social media. That’s the difference between today and thirty or even forty years ago – within a couple of clicks I can see fan reaction. Suffice to say, all was not well. There were fans, like myself, who were excited to see the band go on. However, many were not. Some say that because Tony has left, Spandau Ballet as we’ve all come to know it, no longer exists. Rename, reframe, and move on if they care to do so, but using the same name isn’t right. Many others think that no matter what the band does, it won’t be the same and that they should just quit.  Apparently for those people, Tony was the band.

I don’t know what Spandau will sound like. I’m assuming it will be very different with someone else at the microphone. Even in the case of Duran Duran – band members have changed, but Simon has always been the singer – changes still come with every album.  Some, I’ve loved, others, I have not. There’s no argument from me that a new lead singer will take getting used to, only that I really believe  they have the right to try.

As for the name of the band, that’s a legal thing, worked out amongst the members.  Tony continues to have Spandau Ballet songs in his set, although they’ve been totally rearranged so that the highlight is completely and totally on his voice. He doesn’t tour as Tony Hadley, ex-Spandau Ballet or whatever-you-will, he just tours as himself with a backing band. I think it’s bizarre (and not entirely successful, in my own opinion) to hear Tony singing, but to have other people playing a different arrangement of the songs I grew up with. He’s covering Spandau, so to speak. I think it sounds a little weird, but it is his right to move on.

Can you imagine if it were Duran Duran?  Spandau Ballet fans are easily as ardent as Duran fans. They are certainly as opinionated, and possibly as stubborn. I cringe and shudder to think what might be said if Simon were to go it alone and leave the band. I’m sure many are saying that the band would hang it up. Maybe they would. It is certainly their right to do so. But it would also be their right to try.  Wouldn’t we owe it to them, at least in some sense, to applaud their strength and fortitude to have a go at it?  We might not like it (but hell, as I said above, there have been entire albums I haven’t necessarily loved and yet I survived!), but I still applaud their willingness to keep going. That’s the creative process at work.

As a fan, it is difficult to see past the emotionality, but we should try. The band name brings out certain feelings and memories. To the band themselves – it’s more than that. In the eyes of the courts, Spandau Ballet is a partnership, a legal entity. The business is entwined with the time and energy spent together.  In the midst of the drama, I suspect the arrangements and legalities become more about the pieces of paper indicating who is entitled to what and so forth moving forward, than history and emotions. Someone said that dissolving a band partnership is like a divorce, and I don’t doubt that. In this case, the vocalist starts over, single and free with a solo career, the band keeps the name and marries a new lead singer. Fans are caught in the middle, just like the children. We’re pissed that our family name is continuing to be used by someone we don’t even know or recognize. It’s hard.

Ultimately, Spandau is trying to move on. I can’t blame them.  I wish them nothing but success. I suspect it must really be difficult to be in their shoes right now, and I applaud their bravery. I wish fans would think about that a little more before being so quick to tell them to hang it up. For us, it’s about music we love. For the band, it’s their career.  Why shouldn’t they keep trying? I’m going to keep cheering them on, even though I would love to be there in person to witness The Next Line at that first London show.

Here’s to possibilities and not giving up! Cheers!

-R

 

Atlantis Resort, Bahamas 2008

I’ve got one question for all of you Duranies out there today. Who was lucky enough to go hang out with the band in the Bahamas back in 2008??? Huh? Show yourselves!!  On this date in 2008, Duran Duran played the Atlantis Resort. Were you there?

Right now, a Caribbean vacation is sounding pretty nice, I must admit. I’ve never been to Atlantis, and I don’t even really have a good memory of this show happening! I couldn’t figure out why I don’t remember it until I thought more about the date, and the year.

My youngest was not even a month old, and unfortunately – I was about to host the memorial for my dad. That’s why I don’t remember anything about it.  There was so much going on at the time, and I was in a fog for sure.

So much of my life memories are tied up with this band. Sometimes I think it’s the only way I remember anything at all – I think about what album was out at the time, or what tour was taking place.  Do we all do that or is it just me?

No matter, I’m looking forward to reading tales of sand, sun and Duran Duran from those of you who were lucky enough to be there! Enlighten me!

-R

Z100 press conference to announce Power Station dates

For today’s post I want you to sit and think back to May of 1985.

What comes to mind?

If you’re like me, you’re going through the possibilities in your head. Was Duran Duran especially active then? No…they’d already finished the Sing Blue Silver tour, and it was before they played at Live Aid. It was quiet as far that goes. Power Station though, wasn’t this right during that time??

Yes, yes it was. For me personally, Power Station was kind of like the band that kept me going. After all, John and Andy were both in it, and I will admit that I appreciated the heavier sound. It wasn’t until later this same year that Arcadia answered the Power Station record with one of their own, So Red the Rose. I don’t think I even knew Arcadia was about to be “a thing” in May of 1985. So, Power Station was “it”.

On this date in 1985, Power Station held a press conference on Z100 radio in New York to announce dates for their upcoming tour.

I don’t remember if this was simulcast to any stations across the country, but I do remember hearing the upcoming dates on at least one of my local radio stations. I begged and pleaded with the parental units. In 1985, I was 14. Surely I was old enough to finally go to a concert?!?

My parents weren’t quite so sure. Yes, they were pretty protective and strict. People think I’m joking, but I gleefully tell a story about my mom and how for the first ten or so years of my life, I wasn’t allowed to cross the street…in our neighborhood…without her standing outside to watch me, if not holding my hand tightly while I crossed. I’m really not exaggerating. Hearing the tales of friends taking the tube to hang outside of the studio where the band was recording or standing outside one of their homes seems very wild to me. I wasn’t even allowed to walk down my street without having a conversation with my mom first! (and no, I didn’t walk myself to school either. Are you kidding? gasp I had to cross several completely quiet, very safe, streets to get there!)

So, the jury was out as to whether I’d be allowed to go, and it definitely didn’t cross my parents minds that if they were so concerned, they could just go with me. Yet, fate had plans for me. I am the second youngest grandchild on both sides of the family. The title of youngest goes to my sister, Robin. Most of our cousins are ten years older than we are, and I even have one cousin that is only four years younger than my mom. In any case, I do have one cousin that is only a couple of years older than I am, and her older brother agreed to take us to see Power Station. So later that summer, I finally saw not only my first concert, but two Taylors on stage…and THAT is my memory of the Power Station tour!

Anyone remember listening to that Z100 press conference?

-R

You’re Going to Find Out

On Monday, Rhonda wrote a blog highlighting her biggest personal moment with Duran Duran.  (If you didn’t read it, go here.)  Since then, I, too, took time to think about mine.  Is mine like Rhonda’s in that my moment is a return to the fandom?  Is it the time that I met Rhonda and other fans?  Maybe it was something like one of the trips to the UK.  Like Rhonda, I think that I could choose any of those and would be right on in doing so.  Yet, I tend to think of my fandom journey to be in parts and each part has a big moment.  Thus, I have to decide which part matters most to me.

Part one of my fandom definitely has to be fandom as a kid.  This is when I fell in love with the band in the first place.  In thinking about that time, the big moment has to be when I fell in love with the Reflex.  It pushed me from casual fan to Duranie.  If that hadn’t happened, I doubt I would have still been a fan today.  Therefore, that is definitely a worthy moment.  Biggest personal one, though?  I’m not sure.

The next part of my fandom surrounds the reunion and returning to being a loud and proud Duranie.  I know that I have talked about this a lot on here but it is worth sharing a little again.  Around the time of the reunion, I found myself overwhelmed with the beginning of my teaching career with grad school on top of that.  To say that I didn’t have a lot of extra time would be an understatement of epic proportions.  I heard rumblings of a reunion but put blinders on as I kept telling myself that I didn’t care.  Interestingly enough, as I finished grad school, I found myself watching the silly TV show, Roswell, religiously.  I appreciated the escape with it and the outsider as hero theme.  My lonely self sought out others who were as into the show as I was.  This lead me to message boards and eventually to meeting other Midwestern fans.

One of these fellow fans mentioned Duran Duran in passing one day.  That is all it took.  I had free time by then as I had finally gotten that Master’s Degree and needed something to obsess over.  My Roswell internet searches turned to Duran Duran ones and to Duranies, which eventually led me here.  That moment, that one mention certainly was a big moment in terms of my Duran fandom.  The biggest?  I am sure that I could make the case for that, for sure.  While that one comment got me back to Duran, I’m not sure I would vote for it as the biggest.  Stick with me here because my biggest moment, I think, will explain why this one didn’t matter as much.

After that reminder, I found Duran message boards and made the decision to attend that Duran fans convention in 2004 in New Orleans.  This, of course, is the event in which I met Rhonda and so many other fans whom I’m lucky enough to call my friends.  From there, this led to going on tour, seeing a bunch of concerts and so much more as part three of my fandom.  I might even say that this led to so much fun that I’m still getting over it.  Yet, despite all that, I’m still not sure that I would pick the convention as the biggest.

In 2008, my fandom took a turn for the fourth segment of my fandom journey.  It ceased being nothing but fun.  I noticed fans behaving in ways that made me curious.  Heck, I found myself doing things and thinking things that normally I wouldn’t.  At first, I tried to ignore observation of myself and others and just have fun, which wasn’t always easy for a variety of reasons (Red Carpet Massacre division, anyone?).  At the end of 2008, Rhonda and I decided to go to a few shows in the Northeast.  During that tour, I lost a friendship as this person made some decisions that felt like she  placed fandom over friendship.  I was hurt.  Friendships mean the world to me.  As someone who struggled (and struggles) to make friends, I appreciate each friend.  When I have strong, loyal friendships, I feel stronger and more confident in everything I do.  When it feels like I don’t matter or don’t matter much to a friend, it feels like being stabbed in the gut.

I had a choice then.  One option could have been to walk away from fandom.  After all, a lot of the fun had left with the Astronaut era.  If I had chosen that, then, I think the biggest moment with Duran would have been attending that convention.  Yet, I chose something different.  I sought out understanding.  I wanted to “get” or comprehend this former friend of mine.  I needed to understand myself, too.  The idea was simple.  If I could understand fans better, then I could figure out how to make it fun again.  This decision, of course, has led Rhonda and myself to research fandom for years.  We have written about our experiences and our research with the goal of one day getting something out there.  The moment that Rhonda and I came up with the idea of researching and writing about fandom took my fandom to a new level.  It led to this blog, much research and more.  Frankly, it increased whatever commitment I had to Duran.  I cannot see just walking away now or ever.

-A

Taking a few days off

Hi everyone!

My apologies for not posting yesterday. It was a crazy day, and I have more of that coming my way.

As a result, I’ve decided to take a few days off. I’m not going on vacation or anything like that, I just need to focus on getting a few things done here at home. My original plan was to continue blogging, but I’ve got a lot that needs to get done between now and Monday.

The good news is that my husband is going back to work! It took much longer than either of us would have liked, but he has a great job with a wonderful company, and I’ll probably be sharing more of my adventures to come as time goes on. Right now though, I’m just going to keep it short and say that I’ll be back blogging next week for sure, but that over this summer, I’m probably going to have to take more time off here and there.

With that, I’m over and out for the week.

-R

 

Looking Back to 1983

The other day DDHQ tweeted this:

I saw it when it was tweeted but had no idea what it was about.  Sadly, I didn’t have much of a chance to look closer at it.  I had a sense that the quote about the band lacking a private life was something said in the 80s but I didn’t even notice that People was listed in the tweet.  Now, because it is the weekend, I have had a chance to actual click on the link.  If you haven’t done it, I recommend it.  You can go here:  “Duran Duran Was ‘Hungry Like the Wolf’ for Stardom-And Then Came Along MTV.”  

The link is to an article that appeared in People magazine on December 5, 1983.  Well, I read it.  On one hand, it was exactly what I was expecting and on the other, it wasn’t.  Frankly, I know that Duran faced a boatload of criticism during the 80s and assumed that this article would be filled with insulting language.  While it wasn’t perfect, it could have been worse.  Interestingly enough, the most negative statements came from quotes from critics not involved in this particular article.  A perfect example of this was this paragraph:  “How important was MTV in the rise of Duran Duran? All-important, some critics contend. As David Handler put it: “After all, the clips are a heckuva lot more striking than the music, which is little more than pasteurized, synthesized pop-rock with video launching pads for lyrics.”  What always fascinated me then and still does now, why is having MTV important to Duran’s success a bad thing?  I know that the critics would say something along the lines of how their music should speak for itself but isn’t MTV just a means of getting their music out there?  Is it really that different than appearances on shows like Top of the Pops or American Bandstand?  After all, fans can see what they look like on those shows.

I appreciated the fact that the article featured what I saw as generally accurate history of the band’s formation.  Beyond that, People magazine reported on the recording of Seven and the Ragged Tiger and how their fame had really become overwhelming.  The best line, though, of the whole article, in my opinion, was not the one that DDHQ quoted but the last line.  “We don’t want to be has-beens by the time we’re 25,” said Roger. “It would be the worst thing in the world to go around saying to people, ‘Do you know who I used to be?’ ”  Oh, Roger, if only I could have told him in 1983 that they definitely wouldn’t be has-beens by the time that they were 25 or 35 or 45 or even 55.  People still know who they are.

-A

If You Leave a Light On For Me

Some people might describe me as intense.  When I am into something, I dive deep no matter how much it seems to others that I’m drowning.  I don’t have a half speed.  It is either all or nothing.  One can see this aspect of my personality in everything I do.  When I’m focused on teaching, I’m really attentive on whatever needs to be done.  At work, I rarely even take a minute or two to think about much else.  When I’m working on a political action, it is all I can think about.  I start dreaming about it.  Then, when I’m on tour, I won’t let work or politics invade my fun.

Lately, fandom has been on the back burner.  Part of this, of course, is because it is quiet in Duranland.  The other part is that I have been in the work and politics zone, not thinking much about Duran.  Yet, even when I have narrowed my focus, it doesn’t take much to bring me right back to my Duran fandom.  I have had a few moments like this in the last couple of weeks that I just have to share.

The first return to Duran fandom was last Friday.  A week ago, I found myself at work sitting around a circle with my colleagues having a structured discussion as part of the school’s professional development day.  Usually, these discussions center around some topic related to education.  Instead, though, the questions this time were more personal.  For example, everyone had to share a passion of theirs.  Another question had to do with a time in which you made “lemonade out of lemons.”  As soon the question was asked of the group, I chuckled remembering a certain trip to the UK in the spring of 2011.  This, of course, was the UK trip of non-shows.  Rhonda and I had traveled there to see four shows with a couple of friends.  Instead, all of those shows were canceled.  We had a choice then.  Be upset or make the best out of a crappy situation.  Instead of being angry, we used the time to see some sites, to walk around Birmingham to get a real sense of the band’s history and more.  I think we even wrote a blog with the title of making lemonade out of lemons.  I, for one, am glad that we pushed ourselves to make lemonade out of lemons.  Did I share this story to the group at work?  You better believe I did!

A second example of a moment that recently brought me back to thinking about Duranland was last Monday.  Rhonda wrote a little blog to celebrate my birthday, which was super kind of her.  The blog featured a ton of memories and experiences that we have shared together in this fandom.  I laughed and/or smiled with every example.  It reminded me of all of the truly great times that we have shared together and have shared in the name of fandom.  Rhonda definitely picked out some amazing examples and even better is the fact that we could probably come up with about fifty more examples.  Of course, the best part is that we aren’t done with this fandom yet.  I would like to make more memories in the future!

Speaking of touring, as I drove home from work yesterday the song “Last Night in the City” came up in the shuffle.  Like the other two moments, this song instantly reminded me of being a Duranie, of the best part of being one, which is going on tour.  I remember when I was trying to bond with the Paper Gods album.  This was the song that did it.  It isn’t because it is my favorite on the album (even though I enjoy it).  No, it is because I connected with the lyrics.  To me, it describes life on tour perfectly.  After all, how many times have we been up all night partying after a show?  Being on tour is always our time.  It is where we get connected.

As I sit here on a Saturday morning about to head out to a political meeting, I’m thankful that I have moments like the ones I described here.  As much as I love my job and being involved, politically, fandom provides the fun that gives me the energy to do the rest.  This blog keeps my fandom alive.  Heck, even the daily questions help remind me of this aspect of my life.  I’m thankful that I have something that keeps bringing me back to Duran fandom.

-A

Memories of The Belasco Theatre 2016, or “GA lines aren’t that bad”

A couple of years ago on this very day, my husband kindly drove my friends and I up to LA for a show at the Belasco Theatre. It was a very warm day for it only being May, but we found a shady spot to spread out, and wait the day away in the GA line.

By contrast, today it is raining, and cool – at least by “Los Angeles-in-May” standards. Oh, and Duran Duran is NOT playing today. Yes, there is that, too.

I remember the day outside The Belasco well. Despite my plans to sit down and relax, I found myself up and walking around, talking to everyone I knew. The hours seemed to fly by as I chatted away with fellow fans from all over. I am one of the first people to say that I don’t like GA shows (I really don’t), but I have to say that standing (sitting) in line with everyone all day is not all that terrible. In a lot of very bizarre ways, it’s like a giant pre-show party.  You see people you haven’t seen in a long time, you gab about the band (of course), music, other shows you’ve attended, and maybe someone goes on a food run.

While sure, the waiting can be monotonous, and sure, I suppose it can be a bit cutthroat when you have people around you who are more concerned with being at the rail and loudly asserting that no one dare get in front of them than they are with making (and keeping) friends. I find that many times, those people are the minority, and in the end, don’t need to make a difference in my evening unless I allow it. For the majority of people who are there to have a good time, even if they end up in second, third row or beyond, I can think of far worse ways to spend a day.

The weird thing is that I did know a lot of people in that line at the Belasco!  It was a stark contrast to even a few years prior, when I went to a show at the Mayan Theatre. That show was also GA and required many hours of waiting in a line, yet I really didn’t know that many people then. I kept mostly to myself, talking with my husband and a couple who stood behind us, although I did say hi to the few people I recognized.

Everyone I know who isn’t a huge fan of a specific band the way I am always asks me how I can keep going to shows. They don’t mean financially – although my husband has certainly asked me that very question over the years! Ha ha! They just can’t understand why someone would want to see the same band fifty or sixty times, or more than once during a tour. The thought of going to fifteen shows during a single tour blows their minds. Yet, as we all know, my experience is tame compared to some who have gone to twice or even three times as many shows.

My answer is always the same: it isn’t purely about the band. In some ways, my life might be a lot easier if it were ONLY about Duran Duran! For me, seeing my friends is everything. I don’t live near them. Sometimes, weeks go by without even a single text…and those are just my close friends. There are many people that I just don’t keep in that close of touch with, yet I do consider friends. I see them when I go to shows. I look forward to seeing and hugging those people as much as I do seeing the band. After all, Duran Duran is only on stage for about 90 minutes these days (give or take). What in the hell do I do with the rest of the time while I’m away from home?  I talk to my friends. We get together. We go to lunch or dinner.  We do video blogs. (this is true…and we’ll do them just about anywhere, right Amanda?)  We have vodka tonics or sodas in to-go cups with lids that don’t fit! We try to squeeze in as much time together as we possibly can during the time we’re gathered.

 

 

I don’t know how I missed out on all of that for so long. The Belasco show was in 2016. The Mayan show was in 2011. Before the reunion, I’d only gone to a few Duran Duran shows, and I definitely didn’t know anyone from the fan community. In a lot of ways, I think I’m making up for lost time, now. When I think to my friends in the UK or even a few on the east coast – I can’t help but be a little envious. They grew up together. They spent their teenage years going to shows, waiting in the GA line (and yes, even waiting for band members outside of studios). I spent mine doing anything but all of that. I didn’t meet my touring buddies and best friend until after I’d already grown up, gotten married and had children. So now, I don’t miss an opportunity to go and be with them. It is a truth that is sometimes difficult for my family, but it is something that I don’t want to give up.

Yesterday, I had a student and parent at my desk at school. I was looking something up for them on my computer and they noticed my mousepad. It is one of my prized possessions these days – Amanda had it made for me. It is filled with pictures she and I had taken at various Duran Duran shows. I always smile when I look at it, even during the toughest days at work, and lately – there have been quite a few. Anyway, they wanted to know who those people were (the student, who is in middle school and is now one of my very favorites thought that one of the men must be my husband. HA). I explained that they were Duran Duran which of course led to a full discussion of how many shows I’d been to, who was my favorite band member, and of course – this blog – which I honestly try NOT to publicize at work. The question asked by the parent was simple “how long do you think you can really keep going to these shows and not feel silly?”

My answer? “How long can Simon and the band keep going?  They’re older than I am…and I’m not going to give up before they do.”

Note to the band: YOU’RE NOT DONE YET!

-R

 

Repost: 12 Reasons People LOVE Duran Duran in 2016

In the last couple of months, Rhonda and I have been thinking about how to make the blog work for us but also what our readers would like to see.  One suggestion that came up multiple times was the idea of reposting some of our old blogs.  Both Rhonda and I liked the idea, but we were not sure how best to do that.  Which blogs would we do that with?  Why those?  Are there some blogs that simply wouldn’t work to post again?

Initially, in thinking about this, I started to look at the blogs posted on this date last year and the year before that and the year before that.  You get the point.  It became clear to me that I couldn’t just pick a blog from this day and post it.  No, I had to repost blog posts that are meaningful in some way.  So, I began to approach this idea of reposting in a different way.  Instead of searching blog posts from a certain day, what about posts that got a lot of love and attention at the time?  As soon as I did that, I ran across a blog in 2016 about why people love Duran in 2016.  I reread it.  Strangely or not so strangely, the ideas I shared there still fit in 2018.  When I was done rereading it, I found myself nodding and smiling, enjoying the blog post even more today than I did then.  Maybe, you will experience the same.

On that note, here’s the link to the blog post entitled:  12 Reasons People LOVE Duran Duran in 2016.  After you are done reading it (for the first or second time), let me know if you think it is still valid.

-A